Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Photo by Pixabay

Amid the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, residents of the capital Kabul have complained of "unfair distribution" of aid

Amid the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, residents of the capital Kabul have complained of "unfair distribution" of aid, saying that it was not provided to the vulnerable people who need it the most, the media reported. "Let the aid be continued. But it should be given to people who deserve it," Ghulam Nabi, a resident of Kabul, told TOLO News on Thursday. "No one has given us anything," said Abdul Muttalib, another resident of Kabul. "When we ask for aid, they tell us to wait, but I haven't received anything yet," said Rahim, another resident.

The World Food Program (WFP) said that it has provided food, clothing and cash aid to 15 million people in 2021 in Afghanistan. The WFP expects to reach over 23 million vulnerable people next year in Afghanistan. "There should be a home-to-home survey so we can address the problem of those who are in grave need," TOLO News quoted Wahidullah Amani, a spokesman for the WFP, as saying.

Meanwhile, the Taliban-led government's Ministry of Refugee and Repatriation has denied the existence of corruption in the provision of aid to the people in need. "Those who deserve to be helped, we give them (humanitarian organisations) information to send assistance there," said Abdul Muttalib Haqqani, spokesman for the ministry.

Based on international humanitarian organizations' statistics, over 92 per cent of Afghans are currently struggling with food insecurity. (IANS/JB)


Keep Reading Show less

Popular

Unsplash

Afghans were by far the largest group of applicants in the EU in September.

Afghans lodged more than 17,000 asylum applications in the EU in September, up from 10,000 in August and nearly twice as many as Syrians. This made Afghanistan by far the main country of origin, which Syria had been for seven years until July, the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) said.


Total applications in the EU exceeded pre-pandemic levels for the first time since the outbreak of Covid-19.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia

Afghans, who are in their 20s and 30s-- are now used to a different life which has been free, democratic and open.

By Mahua Venkatesh

Afghanistan, especially its social hue, in the last two decades has dramatically changed, something that the Taliban or even Pakistans Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) that played a key role in government formation in the country after the US troops withdrawal, may not have accounted for.

Foreign policy watchers told India Narrative that the young Afghans – typically those who are in their 20s and 30s-- are now used to a different life which has been free, democratic and open.

"For the Taliban, the biggest challenge is to gain acceptability of the people of Afghanistan, who are now used to their freedom and are quite conscious of their rights—men and women both," one of them said, adding that it may not be easy for the hardline government to manage them even in the medium term.

Keep Reading Show less
Jews (also know as Yehudi) and Parsis (Zoroastrians) stand out in history. Pixabay

By: Surinder Jain

Hindus have been the most tolerant and accepting of people fleeing their homelands ever since people started fleeing their homes. Jews (also know as Yehudi) and Parsis (Zoroastrians) stand out in history. But India today, is also home to many Tibetan, Afghans, Africans and many other ethnic and religious minorities from al over the world. There are many suburbs in Delhi where you find more foreign refugees than locals. Local Hindus and every other Indian accepts them as a part of their family. India.

Keep reading... Show less