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India is a core market for growth at LinkedIn and the second largest market in terms of members after the US.

Professional networking platform LinkedIn on Thursday unveiled a user interface in Hindi, with the goal to support 600 million Hindi language speakers globally.

With this launch, LinkedIn aims to break down language barriers, providing greater access to professional and networking opportunities to Hindi speakers in India and around the world. With the launch of Hindi, LinkedIn now supports 25 languages globally.

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Professional networking platform LinkedIn on Thursday unveiled a user interface in Hindi, with the goal to support 600 million Hindi language speakers globally

Professional networking platform LinkedIn on Thursday unveiled a user interface in Hindi, with the goal to support 600 million Hindi language speakers globally. With this launch, LinkedIn aims to break down language barriers, providing greater access to professional and networking opportunities to Hindi speakers in India and around the world. With the launch of Hindi, LinkedIn now supports 25 languages globally.

"We have witnessed high engagement and member growth in the last year, and it is at this exciting inflection point that we are strengthening our vision to create economic opportunity for 'every' member of the workforce, and taking down language barriers for Hindi speakers across the world," Ashutosh Gupta, India Country Manager, LinkedIn said in a statement. Starting Thursday, as part of the Phase 1 roll-out of LinkedIn in Hindi, members will be able to access their feed, profile, jobs, messaging, and create content in Hindi on desktop, and on their Android and iOS phones.

text on black background LinkedIn will work towards widening the range of job opportunities available for Hindi speaking professionals across industries, including more banking, and government jobs. | Photo by Greg Bulla on Unsplash

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A little more than seven in 10 companies in India are keen on moving to a completely remote setup

India's hiring rate recovered moderately from 10 percent in April to 35 percent in May, but working women and young professionals remain vulnerable to economic turbulence and burnout is a reality, according to LinkedIn, the global professional networking platform. Releasing new data on Tuesday, LinkedIn said working women are four times less confident than their male counterparts about getting a job. And the average time taken for new graduates to find jobs has increased from two to over three months.

As India slowly recovers from the second Covid wave, the workforce is beset with economic uncertainty, coupled with low confidence and optimism levels about their professional future, according to LinkedIn data. Commenting on how 'remote work' (working from home) is here to stay, LinkedIn stated that it offered "a glimmer of hope to new graduates, women professionals, and the future workforce."

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The term was coined by C. Nicole Mason, president, and chief executive of the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR), a thinktank.

The second wave of Covid worsened 'shecession' as twice as many working women in India are worried about the availability of jobs, time for job-seeking compared to working men, according to the LinkedIn Workforce Confidence Index report released on Tuesday. . The term was coined by C. Nicole Mason, president, and chief executive of the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR), a thinktank.

The report, based on the survey responses of 1,891 professionals from May 8 to June 4, revealed how the aftermath of the pandemic's second wave has left Indian professionals -- particularly Gen Z and working women -- increasingly vulnerable to economic uncertainty in today's evolving job market. The finding showed that working women's confidence level dipped four times more compared to working men. This uneven impact has also bruised the financial stability of working women as one in four (23 per cent) female professionals are concerned about growing expenses or debt, in contrast with just one in 10 (13 per cent) working men.

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