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With ammonia levels in Yamuna river crossing the acceptable limit of 0.5 ppm, the national capital is likely face severe water crisis

With ammonia levels in Yamuna river crossing the acceptable limit of 0.5 ppm, the national capital is likely to face a severe water crisis on Sunday.

Ammonia levels increase frequently in Yamuna. The high level of ammonia present in the water makes it difficult for aquatic organisms to sufficiently excrete the toxicant, leading to toxic build up in internal tissues and blood, and potentially death.

Due to the alarming ammonia pollution in the Yamuna, the water supply will be affected in several parts of the national capital on Sunday.

The spike in ammonia levels in the Yamuna has largely hit water production at four main water treatment plants -Sonia Vihar, Wazirabad, Chandrawal and Okhla.

"Water supply will be affected in several areas of the national capital on Sunday morning and evening. The rise in ammonia pollution and high algae in the Yamuna have triggered the crisis, " the Delhi Jal Board (DJB) said in a statement.

The water from the Wazirabad pond is drawn for treatment at Wazirabad, Okhla and Chandrawal treatment plants. The treated water is then supplied to central, south and west Delhi.

Ammonia is an indicator of pollution in the river, and the level on Saturday was around 2.2 parts per million, according to a DJB official. (IANS/JB)

Keywords: Delhi Pollution, water crises in Delhi, increasing ammonia levels in the Delhi, Yamuna River


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