Tuesday December 10, 2019
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Technological Advances to Throw Up New Challenges for Cyber Security

The Internet was not designed for security, hence it is inherently insecure since everything is hackable

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Technological advances like Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, Automatic Cards and others will throw up new challenges for cyber security and all countries must unite to foresee and combat them, a leading Israeli cyber security expert said on Monday.

“The Internet was not designed for security, hence it is inherently insecure since everything is hackable. It is more difficult to be a cyber security personnel than a hacker. The hacker has to succeed only once, where the the cyber security personnel has to succeed always to remain safe, within many rules and regulations,” Menny Barzilay, the CEO, Cyber Research Centre of Tel Aviv University and CEO of Cytactic, said.

He pointed out how “smart people” from different countries are joining hands to commit cyber crimes and hence there is “a need for super-smart people” from around the world to join as cyber security experts.

“Cyber threats don’t create a sense of urgency, unlike a bomb threat, and we cannot feel it in our senses. It is therefore more difficult to convince people that the ‘cyber’ threat is real,” said Barzilay, addressing a panel discussion on cyber security at Nehru Science Centre (NSC) via videoconference.

Technological Advances, Cyber Security, Challenges
Technological advances like Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, Automatic Cards and others will throw up new challenges for cyber security and all countries must unite to foresee. Pixabay

The discussion was also attended by Israeli Consul-General in Mumbai, Yaakov Finkelstein, security experts from the Mumbai Police and students.

Recalling an incident of cyber attack on Sony Corporation after the release of its film, “The Interview”, Barzilay said that corporates are not prepared to face cyber crimes and the government must support them during such cyber hits.

“Billions of devices, part of Internet of Things implies they are prone to hacking, a smart device means being vulnerable, it will also affect our privacy. Big companies have lot of data about users and can manipulate them for private gains, something which allegedly happened in the US elections,” he said.

Finkelstein said that “there’s a war going on all around us, a cyber war, which is about our wellbeing, privacy and safety of our bank accounts”.

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“Cyberspace is the new warzone, and we can’t afford to lose even once. We are all victims here, but each of us can choose to be a warrior as well with mobiles and tablets as our weapons. We must be ‘Chowkidars’ of the Internet,” he added.

Manoj Prabhakaran, the Vijay & Sita Vashee Chair Professor at the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, spoke about how combating cyber crime is impossible without changing the very nature of apps like WhatsApp, and the efforts to fight it must also address tensions between freedom of speech on one hand and user privacy and platform encryption on the other.

Other prominent personalities who spoke included social activist Sonali Patankar (on cyber bullying), Deputy Commissioner of Police, Cyber Cell Sachin Pandkar on government efforts to tackle cyber crimes and cyber threats to children, Ritesh Bhatia on growing opportunities in the field of cyber security and NSC Director Shiprasad Khened. (IANS)

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66% Indian Business Decision Makers Concerned About Cyber Threats

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats

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Cyber Threats
Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond. Pixabay

Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors, according to a new report.

“As the threat landscape evolves, businesses too need to advance their defence mechanisms with synchronised security solutions that are designed to strengthen their cyber security posture,” Sunil Sharma, Managing Director, Sales, Sophos India and SAARC, said in a statement.

The success of an organisation’s cyber security investment lies not just in buying technology, but corporate culture, employee education and path-to-purchase also play critical roles, according to the Future of Cybersecurity in Asia Pacific and Japan-Culture, Efficiency, Awareness report.

“Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond,” Sharma said.

Cyber Threats
Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors. Pixabay

Only 19 per cent of Indian organisations regularly make significant changes to their cyber security approach, and 38 per cent intend to make changes to security approach in the next 6-24 months.

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats, it added.

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According to global cyber security major Sophos, main triggers for security updates — beyond changes to overall security posture — are technology and product developments, compliance and regulation requirements, and growing awareness of new attacks. (IANS)