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‘That’s What They Said’ : 15 Quotes by Influential Women around the world

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May 02, 2017:

  1. “When I’m tired, I rest. I say, I can’t be a superwoman today.” – Jada Pinkett Smith (American actress)

Jada Pinkett Smith, Twitter 

A woman has boundless responsibilities to fulfil and of course, every woman is a superwoman in her life. It takes strength, fortitude, and an indomitable spirit to be a woman and thus it is okay to take a break once a while and rest.

2. “And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” –Anaïs Nin (Essayist and Memoirist)

Anaïs Nin , Twitter

 The thought is evoking and empowering in the absolute sense. Do that one thing that scares you every day. Do not tighten yourself in a bud rather blossom like a flower. Sometimes you will find yourself in a moment that will tickle your nerves and throb your heart. Prepare yourself of the bruises that will come your way. Step out of your comfort and see the world through a different perspective.

3. “Women asking for raises should not only know their value, but they should ask with the confidence that they’re helping the company to be successful.” –Senator Kirsten Gillibrand

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Twitter

Accessing your self-worth is as valuable as the position you hold in a company. There is no harm in asking for raises, you should know your contribution is equally important to the men in the company. There shall be no mayhem in confidence of a woman in soliciting for her share.

  1. “Doubt is a killer. You just have to know who you are and what you stand for.” – Jennifer Lopez (American Singer)

    Jennifer Lopez, Twitter

A woman should be aware of her potentials. If only you will not realise your true potential, how will you expect others to make it certain for you? It is absolutely right to say that doubt is a killer of a person’s potential.

 

5. “Above all, be the heroine of your life, not the victim.” – Nora Ephron (American journalist)

Nora Ephron, Twitter

There may come boundless hardships in life that a woman has to face, in spite of being petrified and victimised, strive to be a fighter in your life. Succumbing to victimisation will only make you a source of pity and nothing else however if you switch to heroism in your life, you will find yourself evolving stronger.

 

  1. “Women will only have true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation.” –Ruth Bader Ginsburg (Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of US)

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Twitter

The quote is by the famous Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg who is a glass ceiling breaker, avid questioner, and millennial sensation. She emphasised on gender equality when she was asked to identify the major barrier in the way of equality for women.

  1. “When we speak we are afraid our words will not be heard or welcomed nor welcomed. But when we are silent, we are still afraid. So it is better to speak remembering we were never meant to survive.” – Audre Lorde (writer, feminist)

Audre Lorde, Twitter

Audre cajoles the student to imagine what it means to live in a culture where to speak is equivalent brutal punishment – imprisonment, death, torture. Can this fear be understood solely as shyness or an expression of deeply constructed norms against owning one’s words? She urges to participate in the global struggle to fight against domination and break the silence with speech.

  1. “A strong woman is a woman determined to do something others are determined not be done.” –Marge Piercy (American poet)

Marge Piercy , Twitter

Initially, when a woman is determined to do something she finds rejection and resistance from the society. There will be doubters on her way to tell her that it can’t be done or that it won’t work out. The strength of a woman is realised only when she overlook the notions of people around her and succeeds. And that’s when you become a strong woman.

  1. “I may be wearing makeup, but I can throw a fastball by you at the same time.” –Jennie Finch (right-handed softball pitcher)

Jennie Finch, Twitter

It is redundant to say that women wearing makeup are not worth playing sports or lack efficiency. A woman can equally play fiercely while her makeup on so any judgment on the basis of outer appearance is abandoned and overrated.

  1. Step out of the history that is holding you back. Step into the new story you are willing to create. – Oprah Winfrey (talk show host, actress)

Oprah Winfrey, Wikimedia

Holding back to resentments will lead you nowhere but in the past only. Oprah urges women to step out of the woeful past and create a new story for her.

  1. It took me quite a long time to develop a voice, and now that I have it, I am not going to be silent. –Madeleine Albright (American politician and diplomat)

Madeleine Albright, Twitter

In today’s world, it is impertinent to be vocal and develop a voice of your own. Unless you can’t voice your opinion and firm your stance in the world, you will no longer be heard or seen.

  1. “I hope the fathers and mothers of little girls will look at them and say yes, women can.” – Dilma Rousseff (Brazilian economist and politician)

Dilma Rousseff, Twitter

Dilma Rousseff presents the harsh reality of the present world. Many times, it is the father and mother of a female child who impedes the growth of her. The change should begin with the home itself, it is only when the parents of a girl child will stand up and say, ‘yes… my girl can. A woman can” – that day will make a huge difference in a woman’s life. As parents, it is your responsibility to show faith in a girl child foremost before anything else.

  1. “Power’s not given to you. You have to take it.” –Beyoncé Knowles Carter (American singer)

Beyoncé Knowles Carter, Twitter

There comes a point in life when you have to “Take it” voluntarily and not wait for the power to be presented to you. You will have to speak up, speak out and share your brilliance with the world. Let everyone know what you are capable of and what can you achieve. Stop waiting for green signals or a tap on the shoulder, do the needful before the circumstances knock you down.

  1. “I didn’t get there by wishing for it or hoping for it, but by working for it.” – Estée Lauder (American businesswoman)

Estée Lauder(right), Wikimedia

You can have everything you want if you work for it – the quote is absolute in all the sense. Nothing comes your way easily until you step out of way to make things happen. We often hope for the good things to happen to us and get nothing in the end. Amidst of hoping and wishing for great things to come to us, we seldom realise the importance of work.

  1. If I stop to kick every barking dog I am not going to get where I’m going. – Jackie Joyner-Kersee ( American track and field athlete)

    Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Wikimedia

Your journey may be full of people constantly trying their best to bring you down, but if you halt at every end of these people, you will never be able to cross the journey. In order to be successful, you must learn to ignore such people and lead the walk of an elephant before these barking dogs.

– by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter: Nainamishr94

Next Story

Melinda Gates Speaks on ‘How Men can Benefit from Women Empowerment’

"Feminism is when a woman has her full voice, and her full decision-making authority wherever she is in her life, in her home, in her community and in her workplace. If she has her voice and can take any decision, then she is fully empowered. And if you believe that, then you are feminist, in my opinion"

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melinda gates, the moment of life
FILE - Melinda Gates displays her new book, "The Moment of Lift," in Kirkland, Wash., April 18, 2019. VOA

VOA Africa Division’s Linord Moudou spoke to Melinda Gates about women’s empowerment, work in Africa, the work of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and how men can benefit from women’s empowerment. The interview also touched on the pay gap between men and women and the anti-vaccination movement.

Q: Melinda Gates, thank you so much for joining us on the Voice of America.

Melinda Gates: Thanks for having me.

Q: You just released a book, The Moment of Lift. First of all, you are well known as a accomplished businesswoman and a philanthropist. Why was it important for you to become an author and write this book?

Gates: Well, I have met so many women and families over 20 years of foundation travels to many, many, many countries, and the stories these women have shared with me about their lives have called me to action. And I wanted to write a book that would call others to action, because I believe that equality can’t wait. When we make women equal in society, it lifts up their family and society, and we need to make sure that we really get to equality for women all over the world.

Q: So when we talk about equality for women, how would you describe it? What are some of the basic steps?

Gates: To me, equality for women shows up when they have their full voice and their full decision-making authority in their home, in their community and in their workplace. If we can make sure women have that, you will have true equality in society for all women.

Q: So, why did you think of this title, The Moment of Lift? What is the moment?

Gates: Well, when I was a little girl my dad was an Apollo engineer, and he worked on that first mission that went up to space, and my sister and I would get to be in our jammies late at night, watching that that rocket take off. And I love that moment when the engines were ignited, and the Earth was shaking and rumbling, and that rocket would lift off against the forces of gravity that pushed it down, and head off to the moon. And I thought about women. I have thought about all the barriers that hold us down in various societies, and if we could remove those barriers, we would get this moment of lift for women and men all over the world.

Q: And let’s talk about some of those barriers. You’ve traveled around the world, working and empowering women and girls. What are some of the commonalities you were able to see, to witness?

Gates: Well, I see so many women that if we allow them, as a world, to have access to contraceptives, what we know from society after society around the world is once a woman has access to contraceptives, she can time and space the births of her children. She can continue her education, she can work in the workforce if she chooses, her kids are healthier, she’s healthier, the family’s wealthier and better educated. So that barrier — every society has to make the transition through contraceptives first. If women have access to contraceptives, and their kids and they have good health, the next barrier you have to remove is education. Because when women are educated, it changes absolutely everything in their family, and even the decisions they make and what they go do in the world.

Q: So you went to an all-girls Catholic high school. So did I, actually. And one of the things I can remember is contraceptives are not a part of discussion — not very often, at least. So what prompted you to really turn your interest into enabling women to have access to contraceptives, as well as family planning? Why is it such an important part of your work?

Gates: Yes, so I was meeting so many women around the world, and I would be there to talk about vaccinations for their children, which they were thrilled to talk about. They said, “You know, I walk 10 kilometers in the heat to get them. I know the difference.” But when I turn the questions and let them ask questions of me, they would say, “But what about my health? What about that contraceptive that, at this little clinic, I can get vaccines and I used to be able to get contraceptives and now I can’t?” And it was through these rallying calls for women saying, “Why isn’t the world allowing us to have these anymore?” that I came to learn and realize the difference they make in women’s lives. And 200 million women are asking us as a world for contraceptives. It’s a very inexpensive tool. We use it in the United States. More than 90% of women use it in the United States and in Europe, and yet if we don’t allow women to have that tool, [if] we don’t provide it, they can’t lift themselves out of poverty. And so I started to realize that was a really important piece of the work.

women empowerment, the moment of lift, melinda gates
Well, I see so many women that if we allow them, as a world, to have access to contraceptives, what we know from society after society around the world is once a woman has access to contraceptives, she can time and space the births of her children, says Gates. Pixabay

Q: And you say in the book, as you work to empower women, others have empowered you. How so?

Gates: I think by other women sharing the stories of their lives. I would often be coming back from various countries in Africa — Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Senegal — and as I was flying home I kept thinking of all these barriers I would see holding women down in Africa. And I would think, “If women could only have this barrier removed or that.” But it was then their stories that helped me turn the questio