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Thousand Of Rohingya Refugees Get Clean Drinking Water, Thanks To Green Technology

The UNHCR along with its partner agencies are hoping to install nine more solar-powered water networks across the refugee camp in the coming year.

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Rohingya, Drinking water, amnesty
Formin Akter applies makeup before heading to Chittagong to attend school at the Asian University for Women in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, Aug. 24, 2018. VOA

Thousands of Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, now have safe drinking water thanks to a combination of green technology and sunlight.

Cox’s Bazar has plenty of refugees. More than 900,000. Most have arrived in Bangladesh since August 2017, when violence and persecution by the Myanmar military triggered a mass exodus of Rohingya refugees.

The refugees are living in squalid conditions across 36 different locations in Cox’s Bazar. Water is scarce in most locations. But sunshine is plentiful. Over the past six months, the U.N. refugee agency and partners have been putting into operation solar-powered safe water systems.

Rohingya, Violence. drinking water
Rohingya refugees carry a hume pipe in Balukhali refugee camp near Cox’s Bazar, in Bangladesh. VOA

The UNHCR reports the first five systems are now running at full capacity. It says the new safe water systems run entirely on electricity generated through solar panels. UNHCR spokesman, Andrej Mahecic, says this new network is providing safe water to more than 40,000 refugees.

Rohingya, Violence. drinking water
A new toilet recently installed in a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. VOA

“Using the solar energy has allowed the humanitarian community to reduce the energy costs and emissions,” said Mahecic. “So, there is a clear environmental impact of this. Chlorination is also a life-saver in refugee sites of this scale. The recent tests revealed that most contamination of drinking water occurs during collection, transport and storage at the household level.”

Mahecic notes chlorinated water is safe for drinking and also eliminates the risk of the spread of disease.

Also Read: Lack of Proper Sanitation Affects 620 Million Children Around The World: Report

The UNHCR along with its partner agencies are hoping to install nine more solar-powered water networks across the refugee camp in the coming year. The project, which is funded by the agency, will cost $10 million. It will benefit an additional 55,000 Rohingya refugees.

The UNHCR says its ultimate aim is to provide 20 liters of safe water to every single refugee on a daily basis. It says this will be done by piping in the solar powered water to collective taps strategically installed throughout the Kutupalog-Balukhali refugee site. (VOA)

 

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Assam Detains Three Rohingya Muslims After Locals Spotted Them

"The three were identified as Samshn Alam (51), Shamser Alam (32) and Shabir Ahmed (64) years," the officer said.

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Rohingya, Assam
This is Rohingyas flag. Assam detained 3 rohingyas after locals complained about them to the police. Pixabay

Three Rohingya Muslims in Assam were detained by the Government Railway Police (GRP) at Lumding town in Central Assam’s Hojai district on Sunday morning.

Superintendent of Railway Police Hemanta Das said: “They were detained after locals spotted them and intimated the police.

“Our sleuths wanted to see their documents but they failed to produce any visa or valid travel document.”

During the initial interrogation, it was revealed that they first came to Bangladesh from Myanmar and then entered India. They also told the locals that they have been living in Hyderabad for a long time.

Rohingya, Assam
The police and other security agencies have detained several Rohingya from different areas of Assam in the past few weeks. Pixabay

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“The three were identified as Samshn Alam (51), Shamser Alam (32) and Shabir Ahmed (64) years,” the officer said. “Our sleuths are interrogating them to know how they entered the state.”

The police and other security agencies have detained several Rohingyas from different areas of Assam in the past few weeks. Most of them have confessed that they first entered Bangladesh from Myanmar and then India through the International Border in Agartala. (IANS)