Friday August 23, 2019

Too much salt intake could be causing major heart diseases and more

A recent study shows that the Indian diet has a dangerous amount of salt intake that contributes to the raising rate of major heart problems

0
//
heart
Representational image, courtesy: pixabay

February 28, 2017: Be it summer or winter, we Indians are bigtime fans of salty food. Snack time without munching on chatpata fries, samosas, chaats and other namkeens is out of our imaginations. Even though most of us are aware of the fact that too much salt is not good for our health, we often convince ourselves to turn a blind eye, or ignore health concerns to keep a check amidst all the celebrations and get-togethers. Just a little pinch of salt can transform an average dish into a lip-smacking treat. The reality is salt as an ingredient is not completely detrimental for our health. Natural forms of salt contain large amounts of various important minerals that can prove to be beneficial for us. But the refined variety, which is known as table salt and that’s what we use in our homes to cook our meals, is devoid of any goodness. So, consuming large quantities of refined table salt can escalate blood pressure and other ailments.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

According to a recent observation, we Indians love salt a little too much. The study which was conducted by an Australian firm has shown that an average Indian consumes about 119% more salt than the WHO recommendation. WHO guidelines suggest that salt intake of an individual should be limited to 2gm per day. The average intake by Indians was recorded to be 10.98 gms, more than 5 times the limit. This is alarming given the rising rate of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs)in India in the recent year. Records show that between 2010 and 2013, around 23% of all deaths in India were caused by such Cardiovascular diseases.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

The study, conducted by George Institute of Global Health (GIGH), was published in The Journal of Hypertension. Doctors have always put importance on the discussions regarding the excess intake of Salt. Too much salt in your body can result in a High Blood Pressure, which in turn can become the cause of several other heart-related health hazards.

The World Health Organisation believes that high sodium consumption (more than 2 gm of sodium which is equivalent to 5 gm salt per day) and insufficient potassium intake (less than 3.5 gm per day) are the reasons behind high blood pressure and are more likely to increase the risk of stroke and heart disease.
Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

Dr Sanjay Kalra, Consultant Endocrinologist, Bharti Hospital, Karnal, and Vice President, South Asian Federation of Endocrine Societies, informed, “Processed and fast foods have become the norm since they are easier to make and carry, and consume. Consumption of pulses, fruits and vegetables has reduced.” A processed food diet is full of harmful fats, sugar, carbohydrates and excess salt leading to conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular illness.

He also mentioned, “High blood pressure can also lead to kidney failure by causing extra strain on the arteries.” The study has also noted that every measure of salt intake made in India except one has provided an estimate above the WHO-recommended maximum consumption level of 5 gm/day. The best estimate obtained by this meta-analysis suggests that average salt consumption in India is twice the recommended maximum level. Another relevant study, published in the British Medical Journal, has pointed out that the burden of several lifestyle disorders such as hypertension and heart disease can be reduced by a government-supported national policy on reducing sodium intake by 10 per cent over 10 years.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

According to Dr K K Aggarwal, National President, Indian Medical Association (IMA), “While sodium is needed by the body in certain amounts, an excess of it is very harmful. Excess salt is directly related to blood pressure. Increase in salt consumption raises the sodium level, thereby increasing blood pressure.” “It can also escalate the risk of major cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease, heart diseases, and strokes.

So it’s about time everyone should start keeping a strict watch on our salt intake.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang

 

Next Story

WHO Voicing Concern about Growing Risk of Congo’s Ebola Spreading to Neighboring Countries

Fears that the deadly Ebola virus could spread to Congo's nine neighboring countries are growing with the death

0
WHO, Congo, Ebola
A health worker sprays disinfectant on an ambulance at a Health Centre in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, July 18, 2019. VOA

As the Ebola epidemic in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo enters its second year, experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) are voicing concern about the growing risk of the virus spreading to neighboring countries.

Fears that the deadly Ebola virus could spread to Congo’s nine neighboring countries are growing with the death of the second person confirmed to have had the disease in Goma, a city of more than one million people. Goma, the capital of conflict-ridden North Kivu province, borders Rwanda and DRC’s gateway to the rest of the world.

Uganda has had three imported cases of Ebola. While it has successfully contained the spread of the disease, WHO experts warn of the potential dangers should the virus enter South Sudan, which is a particularly vulnerable, unstable country.

This is the 10th Ebola outbreak over the past four decades in the DRC. The executive director of WHO Emergencies, Michael Ryan, finds this current one presents unprecedented challenges.

WHO, Congo, Ebola
As the Ebola epidemic in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo enters its second year, experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) are voicing concern. Pixabay

Ryan notes previous outbreaks were generally small, self-contained, and often confined to remote rural areas. This has changed. He says factors such as a conflict, forced migration, unsafe health facilities, and disease amplification are increasing the risks from emerging diseases.

“So, the risk of an individual disease emerging may not change,” he said. “But, the impacts of those emergencies are changing. In that sense it is a new normal and we need to be ready…About 80 percent of our high-impact epidemic responses are in fragile, conflict-affected, and vulnerable countries. So, about 30 countries around the world represent around 80 percent of these high-impact epidemics.”

Ryan says African countries need international assistance to help them strengthen their fragile health systems. Without this aid, he warns, Congo and other nations will have great difficulty in tackling future outbreaks of Ebola and other emerging diseases.

The World Health Organization has deployed more than 700 international experts in the field. The U.N. agency says it is scaling up Ebola preparation measures in the neighboring countries, especially Burundi, Uganda, South Sudan and Rwanda, which are most at risk.

Also Read- Google Starts Testing its Own Monthly Gaming Subscription

It says frontline health workers are being vaccinated against the disease, more Ebola treatment centers are being set up, and more than 3,000 health workers are screening people for the virus at major points of entry. (VOA)