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Veteran Actress Shabana Azmi nominated as the Ambassador for WPSP

"I am honoured to be nominated as Global Leadership Ambassador for Women in Public Service Project at Wilson Centre, USA," Shabana tweeted on Sunday.

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Shabana Azmi
Shabana Azmi.

Veteran actress and social activist Shabana Azmi has been nominated as the Global Leadership Ambassador for Women in Public Service Project (WPSP), a Hillary Clinton-founded programme aimed at empowering the next generation of women around the world.

According to the official WPSP website, it is an innovative initiative to advance women to positions of influence in governments and civic organisations worldwide, and was founded by Clinton in partnership with the US Department of State and the Seven Sister Colleges of Barnard College, Bryn Mawr College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College and Wellesley College.

“I am honoured to be nominated as Global Leadership Ambassador for Women in Public Service Project at Wilson Centre, USA,” Shabana tweeted on Sunday.

WPSP is a programme of the Global Women’s Leadership Initiative. It also mobilises women on issues of critical importance in public service.

Read also: Anupam Kher to Feature in New American Series

Shabana, who has been speaking up for women’s rights and has been working towards uplifting women’s status in the society through her Mijwan Welfare Society, was congratulated by actors like Tisca Chopra and Divya Dutta.

"I am honoured to be nominated as Global Leadership Ambassador for Women in Public Service Project at Wilson Centre, USA," Shabana tweeted on Sunday.
Shabana Azmi nominated Ambassador for Hillary Clinton’s founded WPSP

Acknowledging Tisca, Shabana wrote: “Women leaders can change the world. When women have a seat at the table, they lend their unique perspective to policy decisions that impact them and their communities. I commend WPSP Director Gwen Young and Advisor Sumera Haque for this urgent project.”

While thanking Divya, who said Shabana was the “best one to bring in the change”, she wrote: “Representation is more than numbers we need to take account of where women are present or absent in decision making. Building data and evidence base for women’s leadership is critical.”

The veteran actress emphasised that WPSP’s goal of 50×50 is an important mission that needs people to step up and enable and empower more women to lead. (IANS)

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Instagram Helps Women to Overcome Miscarriage Distress: Study

The extent to which this loss affects women and their families, and the longevity of their grief is a blind spot for clinicians

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Instagram
As far as we know, this is the first study to look at the intersection of Instagram and miscarriage. Pixabay

Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find that their emotional and psychological needs are unmet as they go through a devastating grieving process. But for some, Instagram has emerged as a tool to cope with such distress, a study says.

The study, published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, found that the content posted by Instagram users included rich descriptions of the medical and physical experiences of miscarriage, and the emotional spectrum of having a miscarriage and coping with those emotions, the social aspect, and family identity.

“I find it endlessly fascinating that women are opening up to essentially strangers about things that they hadn’t even told their partners or families,” says Dr. Riley. “But this is how powerful this community is,” said Amy Henderson Riley, Assistant Professor at the Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, US.

The findings are based on a qualitative research study on 200 posts of text and pictures shared by Instagram users.

“What surprised me the most was how many women and their partners identified as parents after their miscarriage and how the miscarriage lasted into their family identity after a successful pregnancy,” said Rebecca Mercier, Assistant Professor at Thomas Jefferson University.

“The extent to which this loss affects women and their families, and the longevity of their grief is a blind spot for clinicians,” Mercier said.

These personal accounts also provided insight into patients’ perspectives of typically defined experiences.

For example, in the clinic, the typical definition of recurrent pregnancy loss is after three pregnancies. However, the researchers found that many patients who had had two or more miscarriages identified with having recurrent pregnancy loss.

Instagram
Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find that their emotional and psychological needs are unmet as they go through a devastating grieving process. But for some, Instagram has emerged as a tool to cope with such distress, a study says. Pixabay

“I’m hoping that this study will encourage clinicians to point patients to social media as a potential coping tool, as well as to approach this subject with bereaved and expecting parents with more respect and empathy,” Mercier said.

Social media is becoming a common avenue for patient testimonials. For example, the short video-sharing platform TikTok has recently become a home for some users to make videos sharing their personal health struggles.

ALSO READ:AI Can Better Help Doctors to Identify Cancer Cells in Human Body

“As far as we know, this is the first study to look at the intersection of Instagram and miscarriage,” Riley said.

“But this is a drop in the bucket. Social media platforms are evolving rapidly and a theoretically grounded research must follow,” she added. (IANS)