Tuesday January 23, 2018

Viral hepatitis Caused 1.34 mn Deaths Globally: Study

Viral hepatitis was found to be amongst the top ten leading global killers

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Viral hepatitis
World Health Organization poster for Hepatitis Campaign. VOA
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London, Sep 16, 2017: Viral hepatitis with 1.34 million deaths globally has surpassed all chronic infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, according to a study by Global Burden of Disease.

The study reveals that in 2016, the total deaths caused by viral hepatitis, including liver cancer, acute cases, cirrhosis, hepatitis A, E, B, C and D account for 1.34 million globally, exceeding tuberculosis (1.2 million), HIV/AIDS (1 million) and malaria (719,000).

These staggering death rates occurred despite recent advances in hepatitis C medications that can cure most infections within three months and the availability of highly-effective vaccinations for hepatitis B.

“It’s outrageous, but not surprising, that the Global Burden of Disease Report found that deaths related to viral hepatitis have surpassed HIV, TB and malaria” said Charles Gore, President of the World Hepatitis Alliance — a not-for profit organisation based in London.

“This is largely due to a historic lack of political prioritisation coupled with an absent global funding mechanism,” Gore added, in the paper published in the journal the Lancet.

Further, viral hepatitis was found to be amongst the top ten leading global killers which include heart disease, road accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, amongst others.

Also Read: WHO Calls for stepped up action to Eliminate Hepatitis B and C by 2030 

If this trend has to be reversed, immediate action must be taken at both a regional and national level, said the report, while suggesting measures such as scaling up testing and diagnosis.

Viral hepatitis is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus and only 5 per cent of people living with the disease are aware of their conditions there are only few noticeable symptoms.

As a result, many people are either misdiagnosed or do not come forward for testing, increasing the chance of infecting others and missing the opportunity to access life-saving treatment.

Reducing hepatitis related deaths by 65 per cent by 2030 is a key component of the World Health Organization’s Global Hepatitis Strategy.

The strategy, which was adopted by 194 governments, sets out a list of key targets, which, if achieved, will eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. (IANS)

 

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How weight loss surgery will decrease heart disease risk

A study conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline

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Bariatric surgery decreases heart disease risk. Pixabay
Bariatric surgery decreases heart disease risk. Pixabay

Obesity can result in heart disease risk, everyone is aware of it. However, these is new way to maintain the health of your heart. Weight loss surgery can decrease the risk of heart disease, a study says.

“This is the first large-scale analysis of predictors of change in cardiovascular disease risk factors among adolescents following bariatric surgery,” said Marc P Michalsky, Professor at the Ohio State University College in the US.

Also read: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

Findings

Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Pixabay
Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Pixabay
  • Bariatric or weight-loss surgery performed during adolescence may provide unique benefits.
  • It minimizes the development and progression of impaired glucose metabolism, atherosclerosis heart failure and stroke.
  • Prior to the bariatric surgery, 33% of the participants had three or more defined cardiovascular disease risk factors.
  • Three years post-surgery, only 5% of the study participants had three or more risk factors; representing significant reduction in the overall likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease later in life.
  • Not only weight loss, the surgery also reduced dyslipidemia risk among teenager — a condition marked by an abnormally increased level of cholesterol in the blood, when compared to the older people.

Methodology

  • The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline.
  • Among 242 participants of the study, 161 underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure, 67 of them underwent a vertical sleeve gastrectomy and 14, adjustable gastric banding.
  • The authors collected data from five participating medical centers for their observational study, and decisions about procedures depended on each center’s clinical practices.
  • The participants had a BMI between 34 to 88 when the study began. A BMI over 25 is considered overweight; over 30 is obese.

You may also like: Worried About Your Heart’s Health? Make These 5 Spices a Part of Your Diet and See the Benefits Yourself!

The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline. Pixabay
The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline. Pixabay

Conclusion

  • The obesity classification with the highest risks of health problems is a BMI of 40 or higher. Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Those with the gastric band had an 8 percent drop in BMI.

“The study demonstrated early improvement and reduction of cardio-metabolic risk factors, offering compelling support for bariatric surgery in adolescents,” Michalsky added.

The study was published in the online journal Pediatrics. (IANS)