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"When India grows, the world grows. When India reforms, the world transforms.": PM Modi

Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed the 76th United Nations General Assembly on Saturday held in New York. Prime Minister Modi touched on various issues ranging from making nasal vaccines in India to making an indirect remark on Pakistan for using terrorism as a political tool. PM Modi also highlighted how India is the mother of all democracies and how strategically and effectively India has managed the Covid-19 pandemic. He made comments on the developments in Afghanistan and poverty alleviation.

India: Mother of democracy

In his address at the UNGA session, PM Modi said that for the last one and a half years the world has been facing the biggest global epidemic of the century. He further added that he represents the mother of all democracies, where there are dozens of languages, hundreds of dialects, and different lifestyles and cuisines. India is a shining example of a vibrant democracy and it is recognized for its diversity.


"Yes, democracy can deliver. Yes, democracy has delivered….When India grows, the world grows. When India reforms, the world transforms," Prime Minister Narendra Modi added during his address at the 76th UNGA.

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Manufacture Covid Vaccine India

Prime Minister Narendra Modi in his address made efforts to make India a front-line fighter in the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic. He encouraged worldwide vaccine manufacturers to come to India and make vaccines in India, he said "I, today, invite vaccine manufacture around the world — come, make vaccines in India," He emphasized India's successfully developing the world's first DNA vaccine and added that the vaccine can be administered to anyone above the age of 12. The mRNA vaccine is in its final stage of development. India's scientists are working on developing a nasal vaccine for the coronavirus.

The mRNA vaccine which is being developed by Gennova Biopharmaceuticals Limited The mRNA vaccine is in its final stage of development. India's scientists are working on developing a nasal vaccine for the coronavirus.PTI

PM Modi put a spotlight on how India managed the "second wave" and emerged as part of the solution for the pandemic. When faced with the second wave India launched a plan "Vaccine Maitri" to reach the capitals with fewer resources at the time when other developed countries obstinately kept their borders closed. This improved India's image worldwide for its goodwill. Highlighting the government's latest decision of resuming the export of vaccines to the under-resourced countries Pm Modi said, "Understanding its responsibility towards humanity, India has once again started giving the vaccine to the needy in the world."

Criticized Pakistan and China

PM Modi referred to the issue regarding the "origin of the Covid virus" aka China and the cancellation of the World Bank's "Ease of Doing Business Index", pointing towards China for lack of transparency in the global institutions. Turning towards Pakistan he argued, "...Countries with regressive thinking that are using terrorism as a political tool needs to understand that terrorism is an equally big threat for them. It has to be ensured that Afghanistan isn't used to spread terrorism or launch terror attacks..."

ALSO READ: World Leaders Criticize US Policy in Afghanistan

Protect our oceans

70% of the earth is water, oceans being a massive part of it. PM Modi added on making optimal use of oceans as a life resource. "Our oceans are also the lifeline of international trade. We must protect them from the race for expansion. The international community must speak in one voice to strengthen a rule-based world order," he added in his address at the 76th UNGA session.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi also spoke on the climate crisis, his speech can be seen as an effort based on evidence to transform India's image on an international platform for crisis management.


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"Malgudi is where we all belong, and where we wish we lived."

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R. K. Narayan, one of the most well-known and popular writers within India and outside India is the creator of this town and the occurrences of this town. The stories follow the characters Swami and his friends through their everyday lives. Be it the story of fake astrologers who scam and loot the people by his cleverness, or the story of a blind beggar and his dog where the money blinded the man with greed; each story has a lesson to learn, morals and values hidden in it. As the stories are simple, easy to understand yet heart-touching it makes it easy for the kids to connect with each character and imagine the story as if the reader themselves were the protagonist of the story. In simple words, we can say that R.K. Narayan simply told stories of ordinary people trying to live their simple lives in a changing world.

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Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourised in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated

The Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) has directed Pak TV channels to stop airing what it calls indecency and intimacy in dramas, Samaa TV reported.

A notification issued by the authority states that it has been receiving numerous complaints from viewers who believe that the content being depicted in dramas does not represent the "true picture of Pakistani society".

"PEMRA finally got something right: Intimacy and affection between married couples isn't 'true depiction of Pakistani society and must not be 'glamourized'. Our 'culture' is control, abuse, and violence, which we must jealously guard against the imposition of such alien values," said Reema Omer, Legal Advisor, South Asia, International Commission of Jurists.

"Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourized in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated, as per the report.

The authority added that it has directed channels time and again to review content with "indecent dressing, controversial and objectionable plots, bed scenes and unnecessary detailing of events".

Most complaints received by the PEMRA Call Centre during September concern drama serial "Juda Huay Kuch is Tarah", which created quite a storm on social media for showing an unwitting married couple as foster siblings in a teaser for an upcoming episode. However, it only turned out to be a family scheme after the full episode aired, but by that time criticism had mounted on HUM TV for using the themes of incest to drive the plot, the report said. (IANS/JB)

Keywords: Pakistan, Islam, Serials, Dramas, Culture, Teachings.