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Why there is need for good Home-care Health System in Rural Areas?

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Rural India (representational image), Wikimedia

Maharashtra, March 30, 2017: Last month, my mother, who is 92, fell in the bathroom and broke her pelvic bone. I live in the rural town of Phaltan in western Maharashtra and to get a simple X-ray done was a nightmare.

We called the local orthopedics hospital and they sent a ramshackle ambulance. How an old Maruti Omni van got permission to ply as an ambulance is anybody’s guess. Even a healthy passenger would feel sick and his/her bones would be rattled in that ambulance while going over the potholed roads of Phaltan. Some of the worst roads in the country are in Maharashtra, especially in rural Maharashtra.

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The driver of the ambulance also doubled up as the paramedic and his callous and non-empathetic attitude almost broke my mother’s heel. He almost threw my mother on the stretcher! Most of the ambulances in rural areas are like that with hardly any facility to help the patient. I had to use an old saree to tie my mother to the stretcher so that her broken pelvis did not shake very much.

At the hospital, after a good deal of arguing, we got her X-ray done quite quickly. Otherwise it takes forever to get it done. Since the pelvic bone was fractured, the doctor advised complete bed rest and told us to take her home. In such cases, there is no surgery needed but just plain bed rest so that the broken bone heals by itself. That is also the reason why I did not take her to Pune for treatment.

We brought her home and were immediately confronted by the stark reality of who will take care of her nursing needs. We tried to locate nursing care in Phaltan but were unsuccessful. Even the hospitals do not provide that facility. The relatives of patients do that in most rural hospitals.

Finally, after great difficulty and searching, we got a 24-hour help (who had almost no training as a nurse) from Pune. This helped relieve our emotional and physical stress.

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Searching the net and talking to my doctor friends, I have finally been able to convert my mother’s room into a home health-care facility. This includes the adjustable hospital bed with an air mattress and a specially fabricated small wheel-chair, which can navigate the narrow passages of the house and can go into the bathroom. I feel I could get all this done because of our resources and ability to spend time searching for solutions on the net. Most of the rural population does not have this luxury.

Another tragedy in rural areas is that no doctor wants to do a home visit. No matter how ill or old the patient is, they insist that he/she should be brought to the hospital or their clinic. I was able to get a person who was not an MBBS doctor but could administer saline or do basic dressing for bed sores. That was a partial relief.

Secondly, I was greatly helped by my brother, who is an orthopaedic surgeon in Australia. He constantly advised us on the basic care and his telemedicine greatly helped us.

Very frequently I have seen that in rural — and also in urban — areas, the missing ingredient in patient care is good nursing facilities. Putting a patient in hospital (whether he or she is terminally ill or suffering from non-life-threatening ailments) means endless headache for relatives, who have to stay in the hospital, undertake the nursing care of the patient and run continuously to get medicines and medical supplies. Besides, the hospitals charge exorbitant amounts for surgeries and for lots of unnecessary tests performed on the patient.

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The government has mooted quite a number of good schemes which provide hospitalisation for below poverty line (BPL) patients and take care of their bills through insurance cover. Yet I have seen these schemes misused by doctors and hospitals where they admit the patients at the slightest pretext and charge them the full amount even for minor ailments. The money is then paid to the hospital by the insurance company.

Our medical care system in rural areas is, therefore, quite broken with very greedy doctors and hospitals that, in collusion with insurance agents, fleece both the patients and the government.

A hospice or home-care health system might alleviate this problem greatly.

This system will rely on specialised agencies that provide trained nurses (at nominal cost) for homes, simple equipment like small wheelchairs, beds, commodes and the like, and qualified doctors on duty who can respond through the internet or mobile phone to the queries from the nurses – and, in an emergency, make home visits. At present there are no such agencies but they are urgently needed.

For the terminally ill, a home-care system which provides nursing care and basic equipment will be extremely helpful. He/she will be surrounded by family and nursing care given by trained nurses will help relieve the pain.

Financially, this system will be much more viable than having a dedicated hospice facility. The financial arrangements on how the government can help organisations in facilitating such a system need to be worked out. A possible solution could be to provide insurance coverage for such a home-care system.

Also such a facility can provide home-care for patients who are discharged from the hospitals. Too often, relatives and the family have to provide prolonged post-operative care –which they are ill-equipped to do. Such a facility could be a boon for those patients.

In urban areas, better medical facilities, including good ambulances, can provide timely care. In rural areas, in the absence of such facilities it is very necessary to have a home-care facility. (IANS)

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The major Challenge is to make the Youth of the Country Entrepreneurial and not Job Seekers : Venkaiah Naidu

"The challenge for us is to make the youth entrepreneurial, and not become job seekers," Venkaiah Naidu said pointing to the NDA government's various initiatives.

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Venkaiah Naidu
Venkaiah Naidu. Wikimedia Commons
  • At a time of tepid job growth and continuing income disparities, the major challenge is to make the youth of the country entrepreneurial and not job seekers, Vice President  Venkaiah Naidu said on Thursday.

“Disparities continue to remain in India and so there is a need for inclusive growth… there is the need to take care of the suppressed, oppressed and depressed,” Venkaiah Naidu said at the Bharatiya Yuva Shakti Trust’s (BYST) silver jubilee celebrations here with Britain’s Prince Charles as the chief guest.

“The challenge for us is to make the youth entrepreneurial, and not become job seekers,” Venkaiah Naidu said pointing to the NDA government’s various initiatives to encourage youth enterprises like Startup India, Standup India and the Mudra financing scheme for underprivileged sections.

Modelled on Prince Charles’ Trust for business startups, BYST, founded by Lakshmi Venkatesan, daughter of former President R. Venkatraman, is engaged in building rural entrepreneurship — “grampreneurs” — as also enterprise among under-privileged sections, which includes business mentoring. The current BYST chairman is Bajaj Group chief, Rahul Bajaj.

“Without mentoring, it would be very difficult to set up startups, with all the business, marketing and other vital issues involved in the first two-three years,” Prince Charles said in his address at the International Mentoring Summit organized by BYST to mark its 25 years.

“What amazes me are the sheer number of jobs these young entrepreneurs had created. The aim of such a project should be to create a virtual cycle of creating entrepreneurs who can then invest in the future of business,” Charles said referring to his trust.

BYST was officially launched in 1992 by Prince Charles and expanded its operations to six major regions of India.

Out of these six regions, four — Delhi, Chennai, Pune and Hyderabad — run the urban programme while two regions — Haryana and Maharashtra — run the rural programme.(IANS)

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Thane (Maharashtra) to be assessed for implementing district cooling system

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Thane
Thane (Maharashtra) to be assessed for implementing district cooling system (Image:wikipedia)

Chennai, November 2, 2017: Thane in Maharashtra will be the first Indian city to be assessed for potential for implementation of district cooling system, said the Indian subsidiary of Danish company Danfoss A/S.

In a statement issued here, Danfoss Industries said: “As part of the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All Initiative, six cities in India including Thane, Pune, Bhubaneswar, Rajkot, Coimbatore and Bhopal have been chosen to explore District Energy systems.”

 “Thane – also part of the Central Government’s Smart Cities Mission – will be the first city to be assessed for its potential for implementation of the district energy system,” it said.

Simply put, district cooling is a system where water is chilled at a central place and is sent to various buildings via pipelines to cool indoor air using the air conditioning system there.

According to Danfoss, district cooling systems are energy efficient and would reduce total power consumption for cooling buildings.

The water is not for human consumption.

“With the Central Government’s vision to build 100 smart cities and the UN’s District Energy in Cities initiative, we are certain that the six pilot projects of District Cooling which are being launched today, will serve as an inspiration for the rest of the country,” Ravichandran Purushothaman, President, Danfoss Industries was quoted as saying in the statement.

“Danfoss has implemented both, district cooling and district heating technologies around the globe and we are now looking to showcase this expertise in India as well,” he added.(IANS)

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Prostate cancer, the second most common cause of cancer rises in rural India, according to experts

The rural masses need to be made aware of the treatment, drugs and technologies to combat the disease

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Prostate cancer
Sarcomatoid prostate carcinoma, abbreviated SPC. Wikimedia
  • Prostate cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths among men worldwide
  • Experts claim, that the second most common cause of cancer, is rising in rural India 
  • The rural masses need to be made aware of the treatment, drugs and technologies to combat the disease.

New Delhi, September 22, 2017: Prostate cancer, the second most common cause of cancer and the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths among men worldwide, is rising in rural India, experts claim.

Cancer projection data shows that the number of cases will be doubled by 2020.

“Most of the metastatic prostate cancer cases are from rural areas. Therefore, it’s a challenge to government and doctors to decrease the risk factors and take prostate cancer risk in the rural areas very seriously,” P.N. Dogra, Professor and Head of Urology at AIIMS, said in a statement on Thursday.

The rural masses need to be made aware of the treatment, drugs and technologies to combat the disease.

“There is an urgent need to create awareness about prostate cancer threat amongst the rural population,” said Anup Kumar, Head (Department of Urology and Renal Transplant) at Safdarjung Hospital.

Also read: Abdominal fat drives cancer in postmenopausal women: Study

Safdarjung Hospital sees more than one lakh patients every month from all over the country.

Of these, 20 per cent are prostate cancer patients, in which 40 per cent are clinically localised, 30 per cent are locally advanced and 30 per cent are metastatic prostate cancer cases, Kumar said.

“Prostate cancer has become a major health problem globally during the last few decades. This disease is the second most common cause of cancer and the sixth leading cause of cancer death among men worldwide,” Dogra said.

According to the Population Based Cancer Registries in Delhi, the disease is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in the national capital, accounting for about 6.78 per cent of all malignancies. (IANS)