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An Ancient Hindu Temple is home to the Muslim Population in Rajouri Village, Kashmir

The six to eight hundred years old ancient Shiv temple is looked after by the cent per cent Muslim community at Rechva

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A temple in Kashmir. (Representation Image). Image source: pathikaa.wordpress.com
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  • Muslims of Rajouri district in Kashmir have set an example of tolerance by taking care of an ancient temple in the Rechva village
  •  The six to eight hundred year old ancient Shiv temple is looked after by the cent per cent Muslim community at Rechva
  •  “Temple is a house of God and we have full respect for it. It’s our responsibility to ensure its safety”, the local residents said

At a time when societal upheavals and great communal disturbance fill the air, Muslims of Rajouri district in Kashmir have set an example of tolerance by taking care of an ancient temple in the Rechva village of the area.

Although the local Hindu population migrated decades back, the ancient Shiv temple is looked after by the cent per cent Muslim community at Rechva. The temple is carefully maintained and children are not allowed to play in the complex to prevent any structural damage to it. Some believe the structure to be about six to eight hundred years old, but the exact number is not known, said the greaterkashmir.com reports.

“Almost every day we clean its premises and have also asked our children not to play in the temple compound. We also ensure than no animals from the village is grazed near the temple premises as it can damage its structure”, an elderly resident said.

The grand architecture of the Shiv temple suggests it is the work of experts, with its walls and doors carrying engravings of distinct sculptures of Hindu gods and goddesses. The temple sits atop a ridge in the middle of Rechva village, with its roofs beautified by detailed stonework. Four pillars stand in the four directions of the monument.

Engravings on an ancient temple wall Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Engravings on an ancient temple wall. (representation Image) Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

According greaterkashmir.com, the temple has been protected during tensions and turmoil as the entire complex stands intact as it was years back. During festivals like Shiv Ratri, many Hindus visit the temple and perform pooja.

 “Temple is a house of God and we have full respect for it. It’s our responsibility to ensure its safety”, the local residents said.

An official posted in the area said that the local Muslims “never allowed anyone to damage its property.”

On inquiring about rising violence in the region, a local resident said, “We don’t know about all that, we have kept the temple protected and we will keep doing so till our last breath.”

Although Hindus come to the temple to celebrate certain festivals, the locals have urged the Central and State governments to put the ancient temple on the tourist map so that “devotees will come and offer Pooja. It will also ensure better safeguard of the temple.”

-prepared by Maariyah Siddique, an intern at Newsgram. Twitter: @MaariyahSid

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    So pleasing to hear things like this. Change has been taking place, just like how the Hindus celebrated Kumbh mela in kashmir, is exactaly how these kashmiri muslims take care of this temple as their own.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Truely this is an example of Hindu Muslim harmony in Kashmir irrespective of communal violence which had taken place in Kashmir for years.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    So pleasing to hear things like this. Change has been taking place, just like how the Hindus celebrated Kumbh mela in kashmir, is exactaly how these kashmiri muslims take care of this temple as their own.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Truely this is an example of Hindu Muslim harmony in Kashmir irrespective of communal violence which had taken place in Kashmir for years.

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War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King

The Jordanian King arrived here on Tuesday on a three-day state visit. Earlier this month, King Abdullah had hosted Modi in Amman.

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War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King, Abdullah II. Wikimedia commons
War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King, Abdullah II. Wikimedia Commons
  • Jordanian King Abdullah II said that war against terrorism is not a fight between religions
  • He says that it is between moderates and extremists
  • The king also targets media which portrays terrorism in a wrong way

Visiting Jordanian King Abdullah II on Thursday said that the global war against terror was not a fight between different religions but between moderates and extremists.

King abdullah said terrorism is not about fight between religions. Wikimedia Commons
King Abdullah said terrorism is not about the fight between religions. Wikimedia Commons

“Today’s global war against terror is not a fight between different religions or people. It is between moderates of all faiths and communities against extremism, hate and violence,” the King said while addressing a conference on ‘Islamic Heritage: Promoting Understanding and Moderation’ here in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

“What is heard in the news and what is shown about religion is what separates people,” he said.

He added that around the world, suspicions are inflamed by what different groups don’t know about others.

“Such ideologies of hate distort the word of God — to stir up conflicts and justify crimes and terror.

“We need to take these things seriously…they should never be allowed to distract us from the truth that faith should draw humanity together.”

Also Read: Documentary ‘Salam Neighbor’ shows Daily Life of Syrian Refugees in Jordan

He said faith inspires countries like India and Jordan where different religious and ethnic groups have lived together.

“It is faith that brings together different civilisations together.

Modi visited Amman a weeks ago. Wikimedia Commons
Modi visited Amman a weeks ago. Wikimedia Commons

Compassion, mercy, tolerance are values shared by billions of Muslims and non-Muslims around the world.”

“These values put us together to act for our coming future,” he said.

The Jordanian King arrived here on Tuesday on a three-day state visit. Earlier this month, King Abdullah had hosted Modi in Amman. IANS