Tuesday January 16, 2018

Chai: Health Benefits that will make you fall in love with Indian Teas!

5 Popular Indian Teas that you must know about.

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Different types of Tea in India. Image source: healthytea101.blogspot.com
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  • Tea dates back to the Ramayana ages in India and that’s nearly 2000 years ago
  • 3000 varieties, 0gram of fat and the most widely consumed drink in the world after water
  • India is also the world’s second largest exporter of tea

Mere liye bhi ek chai chotu!”- a line indigenous to almost all people of India. Tea is India’s one of the most loved brewed beverage, something that includes a group of friends under the ‘chhat’ during rains sipping some ‘adrak wali’ cutting chai. It’s a cup of heavenly goodness that you share with your friends, family and partners on a cold winter morning to take the edge off.  In short, one cannot get enough of Tea for the flavours and the benefits that it brings with it. Tea, now the world’s second most popular beverage is loved by India’s from the core of their heart.

Let’s look at the list of India’s top favorite teas:

  1. Masala Chai

    Masala chai
    Masala chai. Image Source :   www.recipeshubs.com

    Masala tea is very dear to Indians, due to the rich flavour of spices. It consists of 6 different additions to the regular tea namely: elaichi, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and herbs. Have a sip of this when it’s piping hot and you’ll forget all the worldly worries. Brewing black tea with the list of Indian spices above makes a good cup of Masala tea. Wagh Bakri Premix, Tetley Masala, and Society Masala teas are the one’s that get off the racks really fast.

     Health Benefits: Prevents body inflammation and fatigue


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  1. Butter Tea

    Butter Tea . Image Source:www.healthy-holistic-living.com
    Butter Tea . Image Source:www.healthy-holistic-living.com

    This tea is also called gur-gur and is the most common drink in Ladakh. The favorite of the Himalayan nomads, this drink contains an enormous amount of calories. It’s prepared by adding butter, water, salt and tea leaves. People inhabiting the Himalayan regions are known to drink 40 cups of these per day!

    Health Benefits: It has an insane amount of fat but is good for people who live in high         altitudes, it’s the fat that keeps one warm. Adding to that, it also helps prevent chapped         lips due to the buttery greasiness.

3.    Assam Tea

Assam Tea. Image source: www.businessinsider.in
Assam Tea. Image source: www.businessinsider.in

Assam tea is also known as ‘Breakfast tea’, it’s named after its region of production, Assam in India. Assam tea is a black tea and is manufactured from a plant called Camellia sinensis var. The cultivation and production are so exclusive that they have their own time zones called the ‘Tea Garden Time’ which is one hour ahead of the IST.

Health Benefits: Can help prevent certain cancers such as ovarian cancer and lung cancer. It has antioxidants that can lower your blood pressure.

4.    Darjeeling Tea

Darjeeling Tea. Image source: www.teekampagne.de
Darjeeling Tea. Image source: www.teekampagne.de

Black, green, oolong, and white are some of the many varieties of this world famous tea. It’s a tea from West Bengal in India and is also known as ‘muscatel’ due to its spiciness.

Health Benefits: It can almost be assumed as a prescribed medicine for gastric ulcers. This one also prevents obesity as well.

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5.    Nilgiri Tea

Nilgiri Tea. Image source: www.exportersindia.com
Nilgiri Tea. Image source: www.exportersindia.com


Nilgiri tea is as popular as the Darjeeling and Assam tea. It’s a tea extensively grown in the Western Ghats. Also known as the blue mountain tea, it makes a great iced tea.

Health Benefits : It helps reduce weight and fight diabetes. 

-by Karishma Vanjani, an intern with NewsGram. Twitter @BladesnBoots


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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Masala chai is the most preferred chai of all time in India as it is easily available. If you do not get masala chai, you can always have adrak wali chai!

  • Aparna Gupta

    Tea is known for its medicinal purpose also. Masala Chai can provide relief from cough and cold.Similarly green tea can help in reducing fat.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Masala chai is the most preferred chai of all time in India as it is easily available. If you do not get masala chai, you can always have adrak wali chai!

  • Aparna Gupta

    Tea is known for its medicinal purpose also. Masala Chai can provide relief from cough and cold.Similarly green tea can help in reducing fat.

Next Story

The Scion of Ikshvaku: A retelling of Ramayana by Amish Tripathi

The book is simple yet written nicely. It can get you engrossed right away. Everything is explained well, it is graphic enough for a reader to play it as a movie in their head.

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'The Scion of Ikshvaku' is based on Ramayana, though it deviates from the original epic. Wikipedia
'The Scion of Ikshvaku' is based on Ramayana, though it deviates from the original epic. Wikipedia
  • Amish Tripathi’s ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku’ is a retelling of Ramayana.
  • The book is a surprise to all the readers who think that it will follow the conventional story line.
  • The book has garnered good responses and has also built anticipation for the other ones in the series.

Amish Tripathi is famous for taking elements from Hindu mythology and adding his own imagination to concoct exciting and thrilling reads. His earlier books on Shiva got rave reviews. And now he’s back, and this time he is retelling us one of our favourite mythological stories. The story of Ramayana.

The first book of the Ram Chandra series by Amish Tripathi, The Scion of Ikshvaku, was released on 22 June 2015 after what seemed to be the most expensive promotional drive for a book, which even included YouTube trailers.

Akshay Kumar at the cover launch of 'The Scion of Ikshvaku.' Wikimedia Commons
Akshay Kumar at the cover launch of ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku.’ Wikimedia Commons

How much did Tripathi succeed in retelling us the story of Ramayana? 

Amish Tripathi knows how to mix mythology with his plots, but how accurate was his mythology this time around? For anyone who knows the Ramayana and expects ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku’ to be the same, must prepare themselves for a shock.

But for those who know how Amish Tripathi goes with his stories, the book will meet all their expectations, for Amish knows how to bend and create a story.

His literary style is nothing classic. Many people don’t even like it, but one cannot help but admire how Amish always manages to create new stories from old, rusty ones. He has an exceptional ability to keep the essence of mythological tales while spinning wildly deviant plots around them.

The narration in ‘The Scion of Ikshvaku’ is very good, with crisp dialogues and suspense which was aptly built up paragraph through a paragraph.

Amish builds upon the epic Rama, in a very un-Ramayana like manner (He never used the word ‘Ramayana’ which is very clever of him). The differences with the epic tale are apparent right where he lists the major characters. Ram is just another human hero and the story is devoid of any magical elements.

The first and greatest difference between the Ramayana and The Scion of Ikshvaku is the depiction of Ram as an unloved prince. His father, King Dasaratha, considers Ram inauspicious and reason for all his misfortunes. The very foundation of the epic is laid differently in the story.

Many characters surprise us we move forward with the story. For example, Manthara instead of a poor handmaiden is shown as the wealthiest businesswoman of Ayodhya in Amish’s world.

Another example is Sita, who Amish appointed as the prime minister of Mithila in his story. Ravana also only has one head in Tripathi’s version, though with a horned helmet.

Amish Tripathi, the author who knows how to bend mythology to create amazing stories. Wikimedia Commons
Amish Tripathi, the author who knows how to bend mythology to create amazing stories. Wikimedia Commons

The intrigue deepens as we read further into the story. Amish has played with this epic and has made it into a story which surprises us at every turn of event. It is nothing like we would think it would be.

Amish is unapologetic about all the changes he made in mythology and that is his USP.

The book is full of examples of Amish’s imagination, but it is for the reader to find them and judge them. The author has packed his book with all the necessary drama-action-comedy masala, the combination which always gets guaranteed success.

Honestly, the book cannot claim any literary merit, but Amish’s easy prose and page-turning style are designed to be enjoyable, not analyzable.

The book is simple yet written nicely. It can get you engrossed right away. Everything is explained well, it is graphic enough for a reader to play it as a movie in their head. This s one book which once picked up, you won’t be able to leave until it is done.