Wednesday December 13, 2017

World Renowned Non-Indians inspired by Hindu holy text ‘Bhagavad Gita’: Read Here!

Bhagavad Gita is said to uniquely bring out the nature of consciousness, the self, the cosmos and God

2
793
Bhagavad Gita. Image source: www.iskconmanchester.com
  • The Bhagavad Gita decodes and presents a fusion of the concept of Dharma
  • It is a belief that the teachings mentioned in Bhagavad Gita continue to be universally applicable
  • The teachings that go beyond race, sex and origin have since time immemorial

Bhagavad Gita, which is regarded as a world-scripture today is certainly one of the most sacred works in Indian literature. It is a 700-verse scripture in Sanskrit, and is believed to be spoken by none other than the supreme power Krishna in the battlefield to Arjuna.

It is said to uniquely bring out the nature of consciousness, the self, the cosmos and god. The Bhagavad Gita decodes and presents a fusion of the concept of Dharma, theistic bhakti, the yogic ideals of moksha, Raja Yoga and Samkhya philosophy.

The Bhagavad Gita was revealed to the world through Sanjaya, who through his impeccable senses recited all the events of the battlefield to the blind king Dhritarashtra.

It is noteworthy that the text is not only a revered one but is also regarded as a huge source of inspiration even till date. Its power of influence is not only limited to the bounds of the country but also stretches far and beyond the geographical boundaries.

It might astonish some but it is a belief that the teachings mentioned in Bhagavad Gita continue to be universally applicable i.e. each individual can seek answers to almost every question about any topic from this holy book.

The teachings that go beyond race, sex and origin have since time immemorial helped the humans to face their problems of birth and death, of pain, suffering, fear, bondage, love and hate and has successfully directed them to the path of inner peace.

Among the very eminent Indians who have been inspired by the scripture, Mahatma Gandhi pronounced, “The Gita is the universal mother. She turns away nobody. Her door is wide open to anyone who knocks. A true votary of Gita does not know what disappointment is.”

Apart from the known Indians here is a list of influential non-Indians as prepared by Speaking Tree who have accepted a heavy influence of the holy book in their lives:

Sunita Williams. Image source: www.iloveindia.com
Sunita Williams. Image source: www.iloveindia.com
  • Sunita Williams: She was an American astronaut and holds the record for total spacewalks by a woman (seven) and most spacewalk time for a woman. Among other the personal items, Williams took with her to the International Space Station (ISS) one was a copy of the Bhagavad Gita.

On taking a copy of the sacred text in space, Williams admitted, “Those are spiritual things to reflect upon yourself, life, world around you and see things other way, I thought it was quite appropriate.”

Annie Besant. Image source: www.thefamouspeople.com

Annie Besant. Image source: www.thefamouspeople.com

  • Annie Besant: Besant was a British socialist, theosophist, women right’s activist and a writer. She became a prominent figure in Indian politics after she joined Indian National Congress.

On confessing about being inspired by Bhagavad Gita, she said, “That the spiritual man need not be a recluse, that union with the divine life may be achieved and maintained in the midst of worldly affairs, that the obstacles to that union lie not outside us but within us- such is the central lesson of the Bhagavad-Gītā.”

Albert Einstein.Image source: www.deism.com
Albert Einstein.Image source: www.deism.com
  • Albert Einstein: This genius needs no introduction. Einstein also claimed, “When I read the Bhagavad-Gita and reflect about how God created this universe everything else seems so superfluous.”
 Aldous Huxley. Image source: quoteaddicts.com
Aldous Huxley. Image source: quoteaddicts.com
  • Aldous Huxley: The author of notable novels likes ‘Brave New World’ and ‘The Doors of Perception’, Huxley while praising the scripture said, “The Bhagavad-Gita is the most systematic statement of spiritual evolution of endowing value to mankind. It is one of the clearest and comprehensive summaries of perennial philosophy ever revealed.”
Rudolf Steiner. Image source: madisonwaldorf.org
Rudolf Steiner. Image source: madisonwaldorf.org
  • Rudolf Steiner: Another intellectual, Steiner who was an Austrian philosopher, author, socialist reformer and an architect also praised the text and said, “In order to approach a creation as sublime as the Bhagavad-Gita with full understanding it is necessary to attune our soul to it.”

-This article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ: 

  • AJ Krish

    The Gita doesn’t have a religion. It transcends all the boundaries put by man. It is no wonder that so many Non-Indians are inspired by the Gita.

  • Aparna Gupta

    Holy texts always says the truth, it depends how you perceive.Perception plays a very important role.

Next Story

Three Perils of Smartphones Your Teen May be Prone to!

Undermentioned are the three effects of smartphones

0
48
Smartphones
Girl using smartphones. Pixabay

Aug 03, 2017: Owning a smartphone is one of the essential things for the youths today, not knowing the fact that extreme usage of the mobile phone can cause an irreversible damage to the mental and physical health. Youngsters have involved smartphones in their routine to an extent that they work, play, eat and sleep according to their mobile phones.

[sociallocker][/sociallocker]

Albert Einstein aptly said, “I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.”

There are plethora of negative impacts of cell phones on teenagers and mentioned below are the three effects of smartphones :

1. Possessing a smart phone will prompt your teen to spend all day hanging upon the device, instead of doing anything productive. Teens who spend much of their time with cell phones are more predisposed to stress and fatigue. It can also lead to psychological disorders in some cases.

Also Read: This new method will change the way you charge your smartphones

2. Many teenagers keep their cell phones nearby while sleeping to respond to texts and calls, which leads to sleep disruption and interruption. Improper sleep in return makes the person irritable and weak.

3. Electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phones get absorbed in the tissues when we hold the phone for prolonged period of time. The nervous systems of your teens are still developing and thus longer usage of phones may trigger a greater risk of developing brain cancer from cell phones than adults.

– prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94

Next Story

Hindu Epic Mahabharata Offers Answers to Psychiatric Issues: India Medical Association (IMA) President

Indian Medical Association (IMA) president Dr. KK Aggarwal said Lord Krishna was the first and the most celebrated counselor.

0
391
Lord Krishna
Lord Krishna delivering his teachings in Mahabharata. Wikimedia Commons
  • Dr. KK Aggarwal says that Lord Krishna in the true sense was the first and the most celebrated counselor in the most revered Hindu text called as Mahabharata
  • He talks at large about the teachings of Lord Krishna in his write-up titled “Psychotherapy in the time of the Vedas”
  • Many celebrities and research scholars have come up and talked about the mental health awareness and issues related to it in various public forums

New Delhi, July 28, 2017: The Hindu epic Mahabharata is a source pointing back to earliest findings of psychiatric dimensions and offers many answers, says Dr. KK Aggarwal, President of India Medical Association (IMA).

“Lord Krishna was the first and the most celebrated counselor in the history of events”, quotes Dr. KK Aggarwal in his write-up for The Equator Line magazine’s latest issue ‘Cobwebs Inside Us’, which deals with mental health. It mentions how a brilliant warrior once overcame his dilemma and conquered the infamous battle of Mahabharata, with the help of the teachings of Lord Krishna. His teachings are all accumulated in the 700 verses worth of scripture, popularly known as Bhagavad Gita.

[sociallocker][/sociallocker]

At a time when there were no psych drugs or mental-health professionals, the Sanskrit epic seems to have offered a few answers to ancient Indians, he says in his write-up titled “Psychotherapy in the time of the Vedas”.

According to Dr. KK Aggarwal during the times of Vedic institutions, the antidepressants did not exist but it was a time when “bucolic environment – woods running along the river banks, deer prancing around, peacocks strutting close to the courtyard – had its own way of healing the bruised mind”.

He further commented on the medical treatments in today’s time differ from people to people, there is an assortment of drugs that nourishes the mental health; but during the ancient time, the Vedic approach to mental health was focused on controlling the mind, intellect, and ego.

“Lord Shiva presents a very Vedic way of anger management. Whenever you are filled with resentment, store the negative thoughts in your throat. After some time, think about the issue at hand with a cool mind,” he writes.

In the article ‘Of the mind and its maladies’, AIIMS psychiatrists Dr Rajesh Sagar and Dr Ananya Mahapatra write: “The future demands scaling up of a wide variety of interventions, ranging from public awareness, early identification, treatment of acute illness, family education, long-term care, rehabilitation, reintegration into society, ensuring of human rights of the ill persons, and efforts to reduce the prevalent stigma and discrimination against these patients.”

Among other contributors to the edition- psychiatrist Dr. Sanjay Chugh, former G B Pant Hospital CMO Dr. Reshma Hingorani, psychologist Pallav Bonerjee and Bollywood scriptwriter Sumeet Panigrahi.

-Prepared by Nivedita Motwani. Twitter @Mind_Makeup


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.

Click here- www.newsgram.com/donate 

Next Story

11-year-old Indian-origin Arnav Sharma beats Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking in Mensa IQ test in UK

Wonder boy Arnav Sharma gained a score of 162 -- the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper

0
252
Arnav Sharma
Arnav Sharma, Wikimedia
  • Arnav Sharma, from Reading town in southern England, passed the infamously difficult Mensa IQ test a few weeks back with zero preparation
  • His mark in the exam, which primarily measures verbal reasoning ability, puts him in the top one per cent of the nation in terms of IQ level
  • The “genius benchmark” is set at 140 and Sharma gained a score of 162 — the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper

London, July 1, 2017: An 11-year-old Indian-origin boy here has scored 162 in the prestigious Mensa IQ test, two points higher than geniuses Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking.

Arnav Sharma, from Reading town in southern England, passed the infamously difficult test a few weeks back with zero preparation. Mensa IQ test was developed in Britain to form an elite society of intelligent people, the Independent reported.

The “genius benchmark” is set at 140 and Sharma gained a score of 162 — the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper.

His mark in the exam, which primarily measures verbal reasoning ability, puts him in the top one per cent of the nation in terms of IQ level.

ALSO READ: Sikh community in London helps deadly Grenfell Tower fire Survivors

“The Mensa test is quite hard and not many people pass it, so do not expect to pass,” Sharma told the daily.

Sharma said: “I had no preparation at all for the exam but I was not nervous. My family were surprised but they were also very happy when I told them about the result.”

The boy’s mother, Meesha Dhamija Sharma, said she kept her “fingers crossed” during his exam.

“I was thinking what is going to happen because you never know and he had never seen what a paper looks like,” she said.

Sharma said his hobbies are coding, badminton, piano, swimming and reading. He also has an unusually good geographical knowledge and can name all the capitals of the world.

A spokesperson for Mensa praised the 11-year-old boy, saying: “It is a high mark which only a small percentage of people in the country will achieve.”

Mensa was founded in 1946 in Oxford by Lancelot Lionel Ware, a scientist and lawyer, and Roland Berrill, an Australian barrister, but the organisation later spread around the world.

Its mission is to “identify and foster human intelligence for the benefit of humanity”. (IANS)