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Around 53% People Interested in Travelling to Space: Survey

The Apollo 11, launched on July 16, 1969 with three astronauts — Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin and Michael Collins — touched down on the Moon’s surface on July 20

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israeli spacecraft
An image of the lunar surface taken by Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, obtained by Reuters from Space IL on April 11, 2019. VOA

Around 53 per cent people will like to travel to space, says a new survey ahead of the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo lunar landing on July 20.

Nearly 80 per cent of the respondents said they would feel safe if a human-looking robot were piloting that spacecraft, according to the survey by technical professional organisation IEEE.

The participants identified solar panel (65 per cent), athletic shoe (40 per cent) and heart defibrillator (32 per cent) as top three items linked to earlier space travel technology.

The respondents believed the next decade of space travel would have the greatest impact on medicine (26 per cent), transportation (23 per cent), computer technology (21 per cent) and environmental resources (20 per cent).

Humans, Businesses, Moon
Fifty years after humans first visited, businesses are still trying to make a buck off the moon. Pixabay

The Apollo 11 mission relied on four computers, considered decades ahead of their time. Interestingly, today’s smartphones are more powerful than the computers the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) used for the mission.

When asked who they would video call from the Moon with their smartphones if they had the opportunity, 56 per cent of those surveyed said they would video call their spouse or partner. Their next choices would be mother (14 per cent), friend (9 per cent) and then father (8 per cent).

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Nearly 400 attendees at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, held from January 8 to 11, participated in the survey.

The Apollo 11, launched on July 16, 1969 with three astronauts — Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin and Michael Collins — touched down on the Moon’s surface on July 20. (IANS)

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Jupiter not as Dry as it was Predicted to be: NASA Scientists

Jupiter not as dry as earlier thought, reveals new NASA probe

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Jupiter
Jupiter may not be as dry as earlier shown by a NASA probe, according to the first science. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The largest planet in our solar system may not be as dry as earlier shown by a NASA probe, according to the first science results revealed by the US space agency’s Juno mission on the amount of water in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

At the equator, water makes up about 0.25 per cent of the molecules in Jupiter’s atmosphere — almost three times that of the Sun, said the study published in the journal Nature Astronomy.

These are also the first findings on the gas giant’s abundance of water since NASA’s 1995 Galileo mission suggested Jupiter might be extremely dry compared to the Sun. The comparison is based not on liquid water but on the presence of its components, oxygen and hydrogen, present in the Sun.

“We found the water in the equator to be greater than what the Galileo probe measured,” said Cheng Li, a Juno scientist at the University of California, Berkeley. “Because the equatorial region is very unique at Jupiter, we need to compare these results with how much water is in other regions,” Li said.

An accurate estimate of the total amount of water in Jupiter’s atmosphere has been on the wish lists of planetary scientists for decades. The figure in the gas giant represents a critical missing piece to the puzzle of our solar system’s formation.

Jupiter
These are also the first findings on the gas giant’s abundance of water since NASA’s 1995 Galileo mission suggested Jupiter might be extremely dry compared to the Sun. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Jupiter was likely the first planet to form, and it contains most of the gas and dust that was not incorporated into the Sun.

Water abundance also has important implications for the gas giant’s meteorology (how wind currents flow on Jupiter) and internal structure. While lightning — a phenomenon typically fuelled by moisture — detected on Jupiter by Voyager and other spacecraft implied the presence of water, an accurate estimate of the amount of water deep within Jupiter’s atmosphere remained elusive.

Before the Galileo probe stopped transmitting 57 minutes into its Jovian descent in December 1995, it radioed out spectrometer measurements of the amount of water in the gas giant’s atmosphere down to a depth of about 120 kilometres. The scientists working on the data were dismayed to find ten times less water than expected.

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A rotating, solar-powered spacecraft Juno was launched in 2011. Because of the Galileo probe experience, the mission seeks to obtain water abundance readings across large regions of the immense planet.

The Juno science team used data collected during Juno’s first eight science flybys of Jupiter to generate the findings. (IANS)