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Around 53% People Interested in Travelling to Space: Survey

The Apollo 11, launched on July 16, 1969 with three astronauts — Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin and Michael Collins — touched down on the Moon’s surface on July 20

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israeli spacecraft
An image of the lunar surface taken by Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, obtained by Reuters from Space IL on April 11, 2019. VOA

Around 53 per cent people will like to travel to space, says a new survey ahead of the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo lunar landing on July 20.

Nearly 80 per cent of the respondents said they would feel safe if a human-looking robot were piloting that spacecraft, according to the survey by technical professional organisation IEEE.

The participants identified solar panel (65 per cent), athletic shoe (40 per cent) and heart defibrillator (32 per cent) as top three items linked to earlier space travel technology.

The respondents believed the next decade of space travel would have the greatest impact on medicine (26 per cent), transportation (23 per cent), computer technology (21 per cent) and environmental resources (20 per cent).

Humans, Businesses, Moon
Fifty years after humans first visited, businesses are still trying to make a buck off the moon. Pixabay

The Apollo 11 mission relied on four computers, considered decades ahead of their time. Interestingly, today’s smartphones are more powerful than the computers the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) used for the mission.

When asked who they would video call from the Moon with their smartphones if they had the opportunity, 56 per cent of those surveyed said they would video call their spouse or partner. Their next choices would be mother (14 per cent), friend (9 per cent) and then father (8 per cent).

Also Read: Honor All Set to Launch its New 9X Series Smartphones

Nearly 400 attendees at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, held from January 8 to 11, participated in the survey.

The Apollo 11, launched on July 16, 1969 with three astronauts — Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin and Michael Collins — touched down on the Moon’s surface on July 20. (IANS)

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Nearly 1,000 Young People March in Kampala to Protest Land, Forest and Wetland Degradation

Statistics from Uganda's forest authority show that between 1990 and 2015, the country's forest cover dropped by half

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People, March, Kampala
Young people gather to protest land, forest and wetland degradation, in Kampala, Uganda, Sept. 20, 2019. (H. Athumani/VOA) VOA

Nearly 1,000 young people marched Friday in Kampala to protest land, forest and wetland degradation around the country.

Statistics from Uganda’s forest authority show that between 1990 and 2015, the country’s forest cover dropped by half — from 24 percent to 12.4 percent.

In addition, a 2015 report by the U.N. Development Program indicated that Uganda loses about 2 percent of its wetlands annually.

The protesting youth, accompanied by a matching band, carried placards that read, “Act Now for Climate Justice,” “Stop Pollution” and “Stop Land Degradation and Deforestation.”

People, March, Kampala
FILE – Dirt is cleared and dumped, destroying a wetland in Entebbe, Uganda, July 8, 2013. VOA

Noah Osbert, a student of Kyambogo University, said world leaders need to listen to young people on issues that affect their future.

“It is incumbent upon them and upon us to show that we have that spirit of compassion to plant trees, to conserve nature for the future generation,” Osbert said. “For example, we are looking up to having industrialization, how are we counter measuring for industrialization? Because it comes along with the negative side of it.”

Research from Makerere University School of Public Health in May 2019 indicated 31,600 people die in Uganda from air pollution-related illnesses linked to dust and industrialization.

In addition, the researchers say Kampala’s annual mean pollution levels are five times above the level recommended by the World Health Organization.

Also Read- Worldwide Protests against Climate Change to Draw More than One Million Participants

“I am going to get lung complications, just because the atmosphere is not safe,” said Akello Harriet Hope, program manager for Climate Action Network Uganda. “Am going to go to the water sources, I consume water that is already contaminated. Because waste management is zero. We are getting health issues related to emissions from the preconditioned cars. So, we need justice now.”

Exporting coal

In February 2018, Kenya imposed a logging ban. In November, the government extended the logging ban for a year, to enforce reforms aimed at restoring forest cover. However, Uganda immediately became a source of charcoal in Kenya, leading to more logging in the country.

Working with the government, activist group Youth Go Green says it intends to plant 10 million trees in the next five years.

 

People, March, Kampala
FILE – Dirt is cleared and dumped, destroying a wetland in Entebbe, Uganda, July 8, 2013. Pixabay

“Charcoal is being exported to Kenya, to Tanzania and other East African countries,” said Edwin Muhumuza, the group’s leader. “But, I think, we are going to put it before government to see that trade is stopped.”

Also Read- Saudi Arabia and India Explore New Avenues Together

The protest march comes just a day before the first youth Climate Summit in New York, which  will provide a platform for young leaders to showcase their solutions and engage with decision-makers. (VOA)