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Akshay Talks About Building a ‘Society’

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But as a celebrity, I should be changing one thought. I should be influencing youngsters to contribute to a good cause. That is how we can build a society. I am doing it in my way,
Akshay Kumar at an event, wikimedia commons
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Whether it is standing up for the rights of stuntmen in the Indian film industry or training girls for self-defence, supporting the ‘Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’ or narrating the story of a man who took up the cause of menstrual hygiene — National Award-winning actor Akshay Kumar has dabbled in it all. He says his social work is a result of compassion towards humanity.

“I am really fortunate that God has given me fame, money and a celebrity status, and many youngsters get influenced by what I do. So, I think my whole idea of standing for any cause is to utilise the power in a responsible manner. My social work comes from pure compassion. I talk about issues that I feel for,” Akshay told IANS here.

Once known as the poster boy of action dramas in Bollywood, over the past few years Akshay has associated himself with films with patriotic themes — like “Airlift” and “Rustom” — and those with a social message, like “Toilet: Ek Prem Katha” and “Pad Man”. While “Toilet…” was about the need of toilets, “Pad Man” was aimed at spreading awareness on menstrual hygiene — both hardly spoken about subjects.

He says though he can make a lot of money from films, he also feels responsible to help in building the society.

He says though he can make a lot of money from films, he also feels responsible to help in building the society.
Akshay Kumar IANS

“If I want, I can make a ‘Singh Is King’ part 2… I know I have an audience for that. I know I can make millions of money from such a film. Not that I am not interested… But as a celebrity, I should be changing one thought. I should be influencing youngsters to contribute to a good cause. That is how we can build a society. I am doing it in my way,” he said with a smile.

The actor, 50, has become the brand ambassador of the New India Conclave 2018, which will recognise rural achievers of the country.

He says change will be visible in the society when people start focusing more on solutions than problems.

“What is the point of endlessly talking about our problems? We know what is the issue that our society is going through. The ideal thing would be find out the root cause and try to resolve them.

“The best part about the New India Conclave is that we are creating a platform where people, who resolve some problems in their living area, will share their story… So that others can follow that same idea to resolve the same issue — water, greenery and pollution.

“This conclave intends to celebrate the ideas, success stories and implement ideas. That is how we can redevelop the bonding and support among each state,” he added.

Also Read: Rajkummar Rao Performs Exceptional in Omerta 

So, what is the issue that he feels should be addressed as a priority?

“I think farmer’s issues — their problems, lifestyle, income. There should be a solution to that.”

The New India Conclave is scheduled to take place in July in New Delhi in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and chief ministers of various states. (IANS)

 

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Artist Renuka Rajiv Takes on Society, Gender Through Personal Narrative

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the "need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages."

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Rajiv described the prints as a "cathartic series" made while living in Melbourne. Flickr Commons

Exhibiting the interplay between words and visuals, a solo show by artist Renuka Rajiv critically chronicles and comments on matters of sexuality, gender, physicality and notions of family and relationships via personal narratives.

“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition, showing different renditions of fabric and paper using drawings, paper mache, tie-dye and embroidery.

It is on at the Vahdera Art Gallery here till August 18.

It includes a large body of textile and embroidery works, sculptures, and twenty four monotypes selected from a larger series of three hundred prints.

The fabric works are mostly made with old garments of the artist’s family and friends.

Artist
“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition. Flickr Common

“This is a moment in a long-term exploration of expressing the aspects of my reality that are outside the material world,” the Bengaluru-based artist said about the exhibition.

Rajiv described the prints as a “cathartic series” made while living in Melbourne.

Some drawings also weave visuals with verbal interjections — sharp observations around gender and sexuality within the larger social context.

“With a strong inclination towards the spontaneously created “hand-made” works, the exhibition accommodates the imaginative, observational and autobiographical,” Vahdera Art Gallery said in a statement.

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the “need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages”.

Also Read: US Painted in New Colours By a Refugee Artist

Rajiv was the recipient of the Emerging Artist Award (EAA) 2016, awarded by the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art (FICA) in collaboration with Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council.

The exhibition is a culmination of the award process including a three-month residency in Switzerland in 2017. (IANS)