Wednesday October 24, 2018

Are you addicted to Drugs? Well, it may cause Tooth Decay and periodontal Disease

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Sydney, March 17, 2017: If you are addicted to drugs, you may be at greater risk of developing tooth decay and periodontal disease than people with no substance use disorders, a study has showed.

The findings, led by Hooman Baghaie from the University of Queensland in Australia, showed that drug use affects oral health through direct physiological routes such as dry mouth, an increased urge for snacking, clenching and grinding of teeth and chemical erosion from applying cocaine to teeth and gums.

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The lifestyle that often accompanies problematic drug use also affects oral health through high sugar diets, malnutrition, poor oral hygiene, and lack of regular professional dental care.

Patients with substance use disorders also exhibited greater tooth loss, non-carious tooth loss and destructive periodontal disease.

In addition, tolerance to pain killers and anaesthetics also contributes to poor dental care, the researchers said, in the paper published in the journal Addiction.

Oral health has significant consequences on quality of life and general health. In addition to functional and self-esteem issues that accompany bad teeth, the chronic inflammation and bacteraemia (bacteria in the blood) characteristic of poor oral health increases the incidence of coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes and respiratory disease.

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Researchers suggested that doctors and clinicians should screen people with substance use disorders for oral diseases and arrange for dental care as needed.

“They should consider using sugar-free preparations when prescribing methadone as well as warn patients of the oral health risks associated with dry mouth and cravings for sweet foods,” Baghaie suggested.

For the study, the team combined the results of 28 studies from around the world, which collectively provided data on 4,086 dental patients with substance use disorder and 28,031 controls. (IANS)

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Quitting Junk Food May Cause You to Suffer Withdrawal Symptoms Similar as Drug Addiction

Understanding whether withdrawal may also occur with highly processed foods was an essential next step in evaluating the validity of food addiction

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Cholesterol -- a molecule normally linked with cardiovascular diseases -- may also play an important role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease, researchers have found.
Junk Food is highly rich in Cholesterol, pixabay

If you are planning to deprive your taste buds of junk food such as pastries, french fries and pizza, expect to suffer withdrawal symptoms similar to what drugs addicts experience, said a study.

The study led by researchers from the University of Michigan (U-M), found that reduced amount of highly processed foods led to sadness, irritability, tiredness and cravings.

The effects peaked, especially during the initial two to five days after they quit eating junk food, then the negative side effects tapered off, which parallels the time course of drug withdrawal symptoms, the researchers said.

The study implications suggest that withdrawal symptoms may challenge first-week dietary interventions, which may contribute to people reverting back to bad eating habits, said Ashley Gearhardt, assistant professor at the U-M.

Junk food
Quitting junk food cause withdrawals as drug addiction: Study. Pixabay

In the study appearing in the journal Appetite, the team included 231 adults to report what happened when they reduced the amount of highly processed foods they ate in the past year.

Previous studies have focused on sugar withdrawal among animals, or the literature regarding humans offered only anecdotal evidence, said Erica Schulte, doctoral student at the U-M.

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What all researchers can agree upon is that the addictive qualities of tobacco, drugs or alcohol affect the brain similarly and cutting back can lead to negative side effects. Anxiety, headaches, irritability and depression are some of those outcomes.

Understanding whether withdrawal may also occur with highly processed foods was an essential next step in evaluating the validity of food addiction, Schulte said. (IANS)