Wednesday February 26, 2020

Asthma Afflicted Children Are Prescribed Unwanted Antibiotics: Study

The findings showed that asthma symptoms are often mistaken for a respiratory tract infection and are given antibiotics as a preventative measure

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Antibiotics
Neutral background picture with asthma medicine. Wikimedia

London, Sep 11, 2017: Children suffering from asthma are unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics for treatment even though guidelines do not support this, new research shows.

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways in the lungs. Symptoms include coughing, shortness of breath and chest tightness.

The findings showed that asthma symptoms are often mistaken for a respiratory tract infection and are given antibiotics as a preventative measure.

Also Read: New Technology to Predict Asthma Attacks in Children: Researchers 

Overuse of antibiotics in children can lead to drug-resistant infections, as well as leave kids at high risk of a future infection that is difficult to treat, the researchers warned.

“International and national guidelines clearly state that antibiotics should not be given for a deterioration in asthma symptoms, because this is rarely associated with a bacterial infection,” Esme Baan from the Erasmus University, in the Netherlands.

“Inappropriate use of antibiotics can be bad for individual patients and the entire population, and makes it harder to control the spread of untreatable infections.”

The researchers found that children with asthma were approximately 1.6 times more likely to be prescribed antibiotics, compared to children who do not have asthma.

“Antibiotics should only be given when there is clear evidence of a bacterial infection such as for pneumonia,” Baan said.

“However, we saw that, in children with asthma, most of the antibiotic prescriptions in children were intended for asthma exacerbations or bronchitis, which are often caused by a virus rather than bacteria.”

For the study, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress 2017 in Italy, the team included 1.5 million children from the UK, including around 150,000 with asthma, and a further 375,000 from The Netherlands, including around 30,000 with asthma.

Antibiotic prescription rates were almost two-fold higher in the UK overall. In both countries, amoxicillin was the most commonly used antibiotic. (IANS)

  • TRAVIS BARON

    The herb bishop’s weed has been found valuable in asthma. Half a teaspoon of bishop’s weed must be mixed in a glass of buttermilk and taken twice daily. It is a powerful remedy for relieving difficult expectoration triggered by dried-up phlegm. A hot poultice of this seeds should be used for dry fomentation to the chest twice daily. The. patient can also inhale steam twice a day from boiling water blended with carom seeds. It will dilate the bronchial passages.

    I read this interesting book howtotreatasthma.­life that gave me a lot of of good use tips about my disease and in addition a different perspective on the most useful therapeutical approach. We think you should read it too.

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  • TRAVIS BARON

    The herb bishop’s weed has been found valuable in asthma. Half a teaspoon of bishop’s weed must be mixed in a glass of buttermilk and taken twice daily. It is a powerful remedy for relieving difficult expectoration triggered by dried-up phlegm. A hot poultice of this seeds should be used for dry fomentation to the chest twice daily. The. patient can also inhale steam twice a day from boiling water blended with carom seeds. It will dilate the bronchial passages.

    I read this interesting book howtotreatasthma.­life that gave me a lot of of good use tips about my disease and in addition a different perspective on the most useful therapeutical approach. We think you should read it too.

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Early Exposure of Infants To Household Cleaning Products Can Make Them Prone To Asthma

Reading labels on cleaning products and choosing those that are not sprayed or contain volatile organic compounds will help minimise a child's exposure and balance the risk associated with using cleaning products in an effort to achieve a mould-free, low-allergen home

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Baby
The researchers hypothesize that chemicals in cleaning products may damage the respiratory lining by triggering inflammatory pathways of the immune system, leading to asthma and wheeze in Babies. Pixabay

Early exposure of babies to household cleaning products is associated with the development of childhood asthma and wheeze by age 3 years, a new study suggests.

“Our study looked at infants, who typically spend 80 per cent-90 per cent of their time indoors and are especially vulnerable to chemical exposures through the lungs and skin due to their higher respiration rates and regular contact with household surfaces,” said study lead researcher Tim Takaro from Simon Fraser University in Canada.

For the findings, published in the journal CMAJ, researchers looked at data from questionnaires completed by parents of 2022 children in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Cohort Study who were exposed to cleaning products from birth to age 3-4 months. Participants in the CHILD Cohort Study were recruited from mostly urban centres in 4 provinces: Vancouver, BC; Edmonton, Alberta; Winnipeg, Morden and Winkler, Manitoba; and Toronto, Ontario.

The children were then assessed at age 3 years to determine whether they had asthma, recurrent wheeze or atopy (allergic sensitisation). The most common cleaning products used were hand dishwashing soap, dishwasher detergent, multisurface cleaners, glass cleaners and laundry soap.

The researchers found an association between early exposure to cleaning products and risk of asthma and wheeze. According to the study, scented and sprayed cleaning products were associated with the highest risk of respiratory issues.

Baby
Early exposure of babies to household cleaning products is associated with the development of childhood asthma and wheeze by age 3 years, a new study suggests. Pixabay

The researchers hypothesize that chemicals in cleaning products may damage the respiratory lining by triggering inflammatory pathways of the immune system, leading to asthma and wheeze.

The modulation of the infant’s microbiome may also play a role, the study said. “These findings add to our understanding of how early life exposures are associated with the development of allergic airway disease, and identify household cleaning behaviours as a potential area for intervention,” said study lead author Jaclyn Parks.

ALSO READ: Xiaomi Works To Make “Smart Masks” That Collect Air Data in Real-Time

Reading labels on cleaning products and choosing those that are not sprayed or contain volatile organic compounds will help minimise a child’s exposure and balance the risk associated with using cleaning products in an effort to achieve a mould-free, low-allergen home, the study said. (IANS)