Friday November 15, 2019

Asthma Afflicted Children Are Prescribed Unwanted Antibiotics: Study

The findings showed that asthma symptoms are often mistaken for a respiratory tract infection and are given antibiotics as a preventative measure

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Antibiotics
Neutral background picture with asthma medicine. Wikimedia

London, Sep 11, 2017: Children suffering from asthma are unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics for treatment even though guidelines do not support this, new research shows.

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways in the lungs. Symptoms include coughing, shortness of breath and chest tightness.

The findings showed that asthma symptoms are often mistaken for a respiratory tract infection and are given antibiotics as a preventative measure.

Also Read: New Technology to Predict Asthma Attacks in Children: Researchers 

Overuse of antibiotics in children can lead to drug-resistant infections, as well as leave kids at high risk of a future infection that is difficult to treat, the researchers warned.

“International and national guidelines clearly state that antibiotics should not be given for a deterioration in asthma symptoms, because this is rarely associated with a bacterial infection,” Esme Baan from the Erasmus University, in the Netherlands.

“Inappropriate use of antibiotics can be bad for individual patients and the entire population, and makes it harder to control the spread of untreatable infections.”

The researchers found that children with asthma were approximately 1.6 times more likely to be prescribed antibiotics, compared to children who do not have asthma.

“Antibiotics should only be given when there is clear evidence of a bacterial infection such as for pneumonia,” Baan said.

“However, we saw that, in children with asthma, most of the antibiotic prescriptions in children were intended for asthma exacerbations or bronchitis, which are often caused by a virus rather than bacteria.”

For the study, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress 2017 in Italy, the team included 1.5 million children from the UK, including around 150,000 with asthma, and a further 375,000 from The Netherlands, including around 30,000 with asthma.

Antibiotic prescription rates were almost two-fold higher in the UK overall. In both countries, amoxicillin was the most commonly used antibiotic. (IANS)

  • TRAVIS BARON

    The herb bishop’s weed has been found valuable in asthma. Half a teaspoon of bishop’s weed must be mixed in a glass of buttermilk and taken twice daily. It is a powerful remedy for relieving difficult expectoration triggered by dried-up phlegm. A hot poultice of this seeds should be used for dry fomentation to the chest twice daily. The. patient can also inhale steam twice a day from boiling water blended with carom seeds. It will dilate the bronchial passages.

    I read this interesting book howtotreatasthma.­life that gave me a lot of of good use tips about my disease and in addition a different perspective on the most useful therapeutical approach. We think you should read it too.

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  • TRAVIS BARON

    The herb bishop’s weed has been found valuable in asthma. Half a teaspoon of bishop’s weed must be mixed in a glass of buttermilk and taken twice daily. It is a powerful remedy for relieving difficult expectoration triggered by dried-up phlegm. A hot poultice of this seeds should be used for dry fomentation to the chest twice daily. The. patient can also inhale steam twice a day from boiling water blended with carom seeds. It will dilate the bronchial passages.

    I read this interesting book howtotreatasthma.­life that gave me a lot of of good use tips about my disease and in addition a different perspective on the most useful therapeutical approach. We think you should read it too.

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Antibiotics Not Necessary for Most Toothaches: ADA Guideline

Studies have shown that antibiotics, which are designed to stop or slow the growth of bacterial infections, don't necessarily help patients experiencing a toothache

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Toothaches
Healthy adults experiencing Toothaches are best served not by antibiotics but by dental treatment and, if needed, over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Pixabay

Antibiotics are not recommended for toothaches, according to a new American Dental Association (ADA) guideline.

Patients with toothaches are often prescribed antibiotics by physicians and dentists to help relieve signs and symptoms and prevent progression to a more serious condition.

However, the new guideline and accompanying systematic review found that healthy adults experiencing a toothache are best served not by antibiotics but by dental treatment and, if needed, over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen.

“Antibiotics are, of course, tremendously important medications, however, it’s vital that we use them wisely so that they continue to be effective when absolutely needed,” said Peter Lockhart, chair of the ADA expert panel and research professor at Carolinas Medical Center in the US.

Studies have shown that antibiotics, which are designed to stop or slow the growth of bacterial infections, don’t necessarily help patients experiencing a toothache.

In addition, antibiotics can cause serious side effects, and overuse has resulted in bacterial strains that are resistant to antibiotics.

Toothaches
Patients with Toothaches are often prescribed antibiotics by physicians and dentists to help relieve signs and symptoms and prevent progression to a more serious condition. Pixabay

The guideline offers example scenarios when antibiotics may be prescribed for a toothache.

“When dental treatment is not immediately available and the patient has signs and symptoms such as fever, swollen lymph nodes, or extreme tiredness, antibiotics may need to be prescribed,” Lockhart said.

ALSO READ: Huawei Expecting to Ship 270 Million Smartphones this Year

“But in most cases when adults have a toothache and access to dental treatment, antibiotics may actually do more harm than good,” he added. (IANS)