Monday July 16, 2018

Asthma Afflicted Children Are Prescribed Unwanted Antibiotics: Study

The findings showed that asthma symptoms are often mistaken for a respiratory tract infection and are given antibiotics as a preventative measure

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Neutral background picture with asthma medicine. Wikimedia
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London, Sep 11, 2017: Children suffering from asthma are unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics for treatment even though guidelines do not support this, new research shows.

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways in the lungs. Symptoms include coughing, shortness of breath and chest tightness.

The findings showed that asthma symptoms are often mistaken for a respiratory tract infection and are given antibiotics as a preventative measure.

Also Read: New Technology to Predict Asthma Attacks in Children: Researchers 

Overuse of antibiotics in children can lead to drug-resistant infections, as well as leave kids at high risk of a future infection that is difficult to treat, the researchers warned.

“International and national guidelines clearly state that antibiotics should not be given for a deterioration in asthma symptoms, because this is rarely associated with a bacterial infection,” Esme Baan from the Erasmus University, in the Netherlands.

“Inappropriate use of antibiotics can be bad for individual patients and the entire population, and makes it harder to control the spread of untreatable infections.”

The researchers found that children with asthma were approximately 1.6 times more likely to be prescribed antibiotics, compared to children who do not have asthma.

“Antibiotics should only be given when there is clear evidence of a bacterial infection such as for pneumonia,” Baan said.

“However, we saw that, in children with asthma, most of the antibiotic prescriptions in children were intended for asthma exacerbations or bronchitis, which are often caused by a virus rather than bacteria.”

For the study, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress 2017 in Italy, the team included 1.5 million children from the UK, including around 150,000 with asthma, and a further 375,000 from The Netherlands, including around 30,000 with asthma.

Antibiotic prescription rates were almost two-fold higher in the UK overall. In both countries, amoxicillin was the most commonly used antibiotic. (IANS)

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  • TRAVIS BARON

    The herb bishop’s weed has been found valuable in asthma. Half a teaspoon of bishop’s weed must be mixed in a glass of buttermilk and taken twice daily. It is a powerful remedy for relieving difficult expectoration triggered by dried-up phlegm. A hot poultice of this seeds should be used for dry fomentation to the chest twice daily. The. patient can also inhale steam twice a day from boiling water blended with carom seeds. It will dilate the bronchial passages.

    I read this interesting book howtotreatasthma.­life that gave me a lot of of good use tips about my disease and in addition a different perspective on the most useful therapeutical approach. We think you should read it too.

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  • TRAVIS BARON

    The herb bishop’s weed has been found valuable in asthma. Half a teaspoon of bishop’s weed must be mixed in a glass of buttermilk and taken twice daily. It is a powerful remedy for relieving difficult expectoration triggered by dried-up phlegm. A hot poultice of this seeds should be used for dry fomentation to the chest twice daily. The. patient can also inhale steam twice a day from boiling water blended with carom seeds. It will dilate the bronchial passages.

    I read this interesting book howtotreatasthma.­life that gave me a lot of of good use tips about my disease and in addition a different perspective on the most useful therapeutical approach. We think you should read it too.

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Fruit and Veg Diet ‘Can Fight Asthma’

The study adds to the evidence on the importance of a healthy diet in managing asthma and its possible role in helping prevent the onset of asthma in adults

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Eat more fruits, veggies to reduce asthma symptoms
Eat more fruits, veggies to reduce asthma symptoms. Pixabay

If you have asthma, switching to a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals may help in reducing the symptoms like difficulty in breathing, chest pain and coughing among many other things, according to a study.

On the other hand, those who take unhealthy diets, with high consumption of meat, salt and sugar, are likely to have the poorest relief from asthma symptoms, the study showed, suggesting the role of healthy diet in preventing the onset of asthma as well as controlling problem in adults.

“A healthy diet is mostly made up of a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fibre. These have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and are elements in a healthy diet that potentially lower symptoms,” said lead researcher Roland Andrianasolo, from University of Paris 13 in France.

“In contrast, the least healthy diets include high consumption of meat, salt, and sugar, and these are elements with pro-inflammatory capacities that may potentially worsen symptoms of asthma,” he added.

A healthy diet is mostly made up of a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fibre.
A healthy diet is mostly made up of a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fibre. Pixabay

The results also showed that for men and women with asthma who adhered to healthy diets, the likelihood of poorly controlled symptoms was lower by 60 per cent and 27 per cent respectively.

For the study, published in European Respiratory Journal, the team analysed data from 34,776 adults.

Overall, men who ate a healthier diet showed a 30 per cent lower chance of experiencing asthma symptoms, while in women with healthier diets, the chance of experiencing the symptoms was 20 per cent lower.

Also Read: Asthma Patients May be Over-Medicating

“The study adds to the evidence on the importance of a healthy diet in managing asthma and its possible role in helping prevent the onset of asthma in adults.

“Healthcare professionals must find the time to discuss diet with their patients, as this research suggests it could play an important role in preventing asthma,” the researchers noted. (IANS)