Monday February 19, 2018

Baby’s first stool can help predict future IQ score

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New York: Analysis of a newborn’s first stool can alert doctors whether a child is at risk of problems with intelligence and reasoning, new research shows.

In particular, high levels of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) found in the meconium (a newborn’s first stool) from a mother’s alcohol use during pregnancy can alert doctors that a child may develop cognitive problems in teenage years, the findings showed.

“We wanted to see if there was a connection between FAEE level and their cognitive development during childhood and adolescence — and there was,” said one of the researchers Meeyoung Min, research assistant professor at Case Western Reserve University in the US.

“FAEE can serve as a marker for fetal alcohol exposure and developmental issues ahead,” Min added.

“Detecting prenatal exposure to alcohol at birth could lead to early interventions that help reduce the effects later,” Min said in the study published in the Journal of Paediatrics.

The research is part of the ongoing Project Newborn study, a longitudinal research project has studied nearly 400 children for 20 years since their births in the mid-1990s.

For this study, researchers analysed the meconium of 216 babies for levels of FAEE. They then gave intelligence tests at ages nine, 11 and 15.

The researchers found a link between those with high levels of FAEE at birth and lower IQ scores.

(IANS)

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Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

For the study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, researchers examined 3,119 non-smoking postmenopausal women aged 50 years or older in the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

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Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers. Pixabay
Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers. Pixabay
  • Women who breastfeed more children and for a longer duration were less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause
  • Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers
  • The study was published in the American Journal of Hypertension

Breastfeeding mothers, take note! New research suggests that women who breastfeed more children and for a longer duration were less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause.

According to the researchers, elevated blood pressure is the greatest single risk factor for disease and mortality.

“Our findings endorsed the current recommendations for breastfeeding for the benefit of maternal health in later lives,” said the lead author of the study, Nam-Kyong Choi from Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea.

ALSO READ: World Breastfeeding Week: Breast milk, the answer to malnutrition in children

Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers.

It has been well documented that long-term breastfeeding is associated with reduced children’s allergies, celiac disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, the researchers said.

However, the effects of breastfeeding on maternal health have been little studied compared with the effects on the children.

Several studies have consistently found that absence of breastfeeding or premature discontinuation was associated with increased risks of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and cardiovascular diseases, the researchers mentioned. Pixabay
Several studies have consistently found that absence of breastfeeding or premature discontinuation was associated with increased risks of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and cardiovascular diseases, the researchers mentioned. Pixabay

 

For the study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, researchers examined 3,119 non-smoking postmenopausal women aged 50 years or older in the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

They found that breastfeeding of more children and for longer duration was associated with lower risk of hypertension in postmenopausal women.

ALSO READ: Breastfeeding of new-born babies during the first hour after birth is less than 50 percent in India

In particular, the highest quintile of a number of children breastfed (five to 11) showed a 51 percent lower risk of hypertension compared with the lowest quintile (zero to one).

The highest quintile of the duration of breastfeeding (96 to 324 months) showed a 45 percent lower risk of hypertension.

The researchers, however, said that this link may prove to be less true in obese women. (IANS)

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