Tuesday September 25, 2018
Home Lead Story Carb-Rich Die...

Carb-Rich Diet May Affect Brain Health

Even small increases in blood sugar caused by a diet high in carbohydrates can be detrimental to brain health, shows new research

0
//
29
Carb-rich diet may affect brain health.
Carb-rich diet may affect brain health. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Even small increases in blood sugar caused by a diet high in carbohydrates can be detrimental to brain health, shows new research.

“Carbohydrate calories, which elevate blood glucose, are dramatically more detrimental to human physiology, and specifically to human health, than are calories derived from healthful sources of fat,” claimed David Perlmutter, a neurologist and fellow of the American College of Nutrition.

“We live with this notion that a calorie is a calorie, but at least in terms of brain health, and I believe for the rest of the body as well, there are very big differences between our sources of calories in terms of the impact on our health,” he explained.

Also Read: Less Brain Tissue not Behind Reading Disorder

Perlmutter would explore further how brain health and cognitive function are linked to nutrition, said his article published on the Alternative and Complementary Therapies website.

Recent reports in medical literature link carbohydrate calorie-rich diets to a greater risk for brain shrinkage, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, impaired cognition and other disorders. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

A Diet Rich in Nutrients Helps In Living Longer: Study

Anti-inflammatory foods consist of fruits and vegetables, tea, coffee, whole grain bread, breakfast cereal, low-fat cheese, olive oil.

0
Anti-inflammatory
This diet may help you live longer Pixabay

Adhering to a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread, nuts, olive oil and canola oil may help you live longer, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, suggest that those who closely follow an anti-inflammatory diet have an 18 per cent lower risk of all-cause mortality.

The researchers also found that those who follow the diet experience a 20 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular mortality, and a 13 per cent lower risk of cancer mortality, when compared with those who followed the diet to a lesser degree.

Anti-inflammatory
A bowl of fresh fruits a day may lower the risk of developing diabetes by 12 per cent, a study has showed. Pixabay

“Our dose-response analysis showed that even partial adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet may provide a health benefit,” said lead author Joanna Kaluza, Associate Professor at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences in Poland.

It was also found that smokers who followed the diet experienced even greater benefits when compared with smokers who did not follow the diet, the team said.

For the study, the research team involved 68,273 Swedish men and women aged between 45 and 83 years. The participants were followed for 16 years.

The anti-inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated using the validated anti-inflammatory diet index (AIDI), which includes 11 potential anti-inflammatory and five potential pro-inflammatory foods.

Anti-inflammatory
The researchers also found that those who follow the diet experience a 20 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular mortality. Flickr

Anti-inflammatory foods consist of fruits and vegetables, tea, coffee, whole grain bread, breakfast cereal, low-fat cheese, olive oil and canola oil, nuts, chocolate, and moderate amounts of red wine and beer.

Also Read: Controlling Diet a Remedy For Metabolic Syndrome

Pro-inflammatory foods include unprocessed and processed red meat, organ meats, chips, and soft-drink beverages, the team said. (IANS)

Next Story