Monday August 26, 2019

Children With Pets During Infancy Less Likely To Develop Allergies: Study

In another experiment, which included 249 children, it showed that the allergy rate for children growing up without a pet was 48 per cent

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Allergies
People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness. Pixabay

Children who live with pets when they are infants are less likely to develop allergies and other diseases later in childhood, a Swedish study found.

The study sought to learn about the possible benefits of germ exposure to infants living with pets in their home.

For the study, the researchers from the University of Gothenburg included 1,029 children who were either seven or eight years old.

In the first experiment, findings, published on the open access site, ‘PLOS ONE’, the researchers found that the incidence of allergies (which in this study included asthma, eczema, hay fever and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis) was 49 per cent for children who had not been exposed to pets as infants.

Allergies
The number fell to 43 per cent for children who had lived with a single pet as an infant and to 24 per cent for children who had lived with three pets. Pixabay

The number fell to 43 per cent for children who had lived with a single pet as an infant and to 24 per cent for children who had lived with three pets.

Also Read: Tips To Keep Pets Warm in Winter

In another experiment, which included 249 children, it showed that the allergy rate for children growing up without a pet was 48 per cent, 35 per cent for children with one pet and just 21 per cent for children who had grown up with multiple pets.

Taken together, the two datasets showed that the more exposure infants have to pets, the less likely they are to develop allergies later in life, the team concluded. (IANS)

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Reduce Heart Disease Risk by Quitting Smoking

The cardiovascular system begins to heal relatively quickly after quitting smoking

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smoking is injurious
Researchers used data from the Framingham Heart Study, a longitudinal study of men and women from Massachusetts, which began enrolment in 1948. Pixabay

Heavy cigarette smokers can reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) by 39 per cent within five years if they quit, researchers said.

It takes at least five to 10 years and perhaps up to 25 years after quitting, for CVD risk to become as low as that of a person who has never smoked, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

“The cardiovascular system begins to heal relatively quickly after quitting smoking, even for people who have smoked heavily over decades,” said Hilary Tindle, Founding Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Tobacco Addiction and Lifestyle (ViTAL).

Researchers used data from the Framingham Heart Study, a longitudinal study of men and women from Massachusetts, which began enrolment in 1948.

smoking is injurious
Heavy cigarette smokers can reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) by 39 per cent within five years if they quit. Pixabay

Also Read: New Study Suggests Living Near Parks and Nature Linked to Greater Happiness

The study used prospective data from 1954 through 2014 from 8,770 participants to determine the effect of lifetime smoking and smoking cessation on the risk of CVD, which includes myocardial infarction, stroke, CVD death and heart failure.

“Our team documented what happens to CVD risk after quitting smoking relative to people who continued to smoke and to those who never smoked,” said study lead author Meredith Duncan from Vanderbilt University. (IANS)