Friday December 13, 2019

Children With Pets During Infancy Less Likely To Develop Allergies: Study

In another experiment, which included 249 children, it showed that the allergy rate for children growing up without a pet was 48 per cent

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Allergies
People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness. Pixabay

Children who live with pets when they are infants are less likely to develop allergies and other diseases later in childhood, a Swedish study found.

The study sought to learn about the possible benefits of germ exposure to infants living with pets in their home.

For the study, the researchers from the University of Gothenburg included 1,029 children who were either seven or eight years old.

In the first experiment, findings, published on the open access site, ‘PLOS ONE’, the researchers found that the incidence of allergies (which in this study included asthma, eczema, hay fever and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis) was 49 per cent for children who had not been exposed to pets as infants.

Allergies
The number fell to 43 per cent for children who had lived with a single pet as an infant and to 24 per cent for children who had lived with three pets. Pixabay

The number fell to 43 per cent for children who had lived with a single pet as an infant and to 24 per cent for children who had lived with three pets.

Also Read: Tips To Keep Pets Warm in Winter

In another experiment, which included 249 children, it showed that the allergy rate for children growing up without a pet was 48 per cent, 35 per cent for children with one pet and just 21 per cent for children who had grown up with multiple pets.

Taken together, the two datasets showed that the more exposure infants have to pets, the less likely they are to develop allergies later in life, the team concluded. (IANS)

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Development of Alzheimer’s Disease Not Totally Linked to Genetics: Study

The research team analyzed the gene sequence and the biological age of the body's cells from blood

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Genetics
With additional funding, researchers could further explore the interaction between Genetics and environment in the development of Alzheimer's disease and the impact of environmental factors in delaying the onset of this disorder. Pixabay

The colour of our eyes or the straightness of our hair is linked to our DNA, but the development of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t exclusively linked to Genetics, suggest new research.

In the first study published about Alzheimer’s disease among identical triplets, researchers found that despite sharing the same DNA, two of the triplets developed Alzheimer’s while one did not.

The two triplets that developed Alzheimer’s were diagnosed in their mid-70s, said the paper published in the journal Brain.

“These findings show that your genetic code doesn’t dictate whether you are guaranteed to develop Alzheimer’s,” said Dr Morris Freedman, head of neurology at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

“There is hope for people who have a strong family history of dementia since there are other factors, whether it’s the environment or lifestyle, we don’t know what it is, which could either protect against or accelerate dementia.”

All three, 85-year-old siblings had hypertension, but the two with Alzheimer’s had long-standing, obsessive-compulsive behaviour.

The research team analyzed the gene sequence and the biological age of the body’s cells from blood that was taken from each of the triplets, as well as the children of one of the triplet’s with Alzheimer’s.

Genetics
The colour of our eyes or the straightness of our hair is linked to our DNA, but the development of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t exclusively linked to Genetics, suggest new research. Pixabay

Among the children, one developed early onset Alzheimer’s disease at age 50 and the other did not report signs of dementia.

The research team also discovered that although the triplets were octogenarians at the time of the study, the biological age of their cells was six to ten years younger than their chronological age.

In contrast, one of the triplet’s children, who developed early onset Alzheimer’s, had a biological age that was nine years older than the chronological age.

The other child, who did not have dementia, of the same triplet showed a biological age that was close to their actual age.

Genetic
Your Genetic code doesn’t dictate whether you are guaranteed to develop Alzheimer’s Disease. Pixabay

“The latest genetics research is finding that the DNA we die with isn’t necessarily what we received as a baby, which could relate to why two of the triplets developed Alzheimer’s and one didn’t,” says Dr. Ekaterina Rogaeva, senior author on the paper and researcher at the University of Toronto’s Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

“As we age, our DNA ages with us and as a result, some cells could mutate and change over time”.

ALSO READ: Samsung India Renews its Focus on AC Business to Become Top Player

With additional funding, researchers could further explore the interaction between genetics and environment in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and the impact of environmental factors in delaying the onset of this disorder. (IANS)