Wednesday April 1, 2020
Home Lead Story Curiosity Rov...

Curiosity Rover of NASA Snaps its Last Selfie on Martian Ridge

Curiosity, which landed on Mars in 2012, was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes

0
//
The rover is currently keeping its
The rover is currently keeping its "eyes" on a dust event that had gone global by June 20. Flickr

After spending more than a year on a twisting ridge on Mars, NASA’s Curiosity rover has snapped its last selfie as it moves on to new sights on the Red Planet.

“Curiosity rover has taken its last selfie on the Vera Rubin Ridge and descended toward a clay region of Mount Sharp. The twisting ridge on Mars has been the rover’s home for more than a year, providing scientists with new samples and new questions to puzzle over,” NASA said in a statement on Monday.

On January 15, Curiosity used its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on the end of its robotic arm to take a series of 57 pictures, which were stitched together into the selfie.

The images feature a location on the ridge called Rock Hall, which the rover drilled on December 15.

The Rock Hall drill hole is visible to the lower left of the rover; the scene is dustier than usual at this time of the year due to a regional dust storm.

TESS, rover, opportunity
NASA Curiosity rover has completed 6 years on Mars. Pixabay

Curiosity has been exploring the ridge since September 2017.

It is now heading into the “clay-bearing unit”, which sits in a trough just south of the ridge.

Also Read- Samsung, OnePlus Best Selling Premium Smartphones Of 2018

Clay minerals in this unit may hold more clues about the ancient lakes that helped form the lower levels on Mount Sharp, NASA said.

Curiosity, which landed on Mars in 2012, was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet’s “habitability”. (IANS)

Next Story

NASA Plans To Unveil New Mission For Studying The Causes of Solar Particle Storms

"We are so pleased to add a new mission to our fleet of spacecraft that help us better understand the Sun, as well as how our star influences the space environment between planets," said Nicky Fox, Director of NASA's Heliophysics Division

0
NASA
NASA has awarded $62.6 million to design, build and launch SunRISE by no earlier than July 1, 2023. Pixabay

NASA is planning to launch a new mission to study how the Sun generates and releases giant space weather storms — known as solar particle storms — into planetary space.

The new mission, called the Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE), is an array of six CubeSats operating as one very large radio telescope, the US space agency said on Monday. NASA has awarded $62.6 million to design, build and launch SunRISE by no earlier than July 1, 2023.

Understanding how the Sun generates and releases giant space weather storms can ultimately help protect astronauts travelling to the Moon and Mars by providing better information on how the Sun’s radiation affects the space environment they must travel through.

Please Follow NewsGram on Facebook To Get Latest Updates From Around The World!

“We are so pleased to add a new mission to our fleet of spacecraft that help us better understand the Sun, as well as how our star influences the space environment between planets,” said Nicky Fox, Director of NASA’s Heliophysics Division.

“The more we know about how the Sun erupts with space weather events, the more we can mitigate their effects on spacecraft and astronauts.” The mission design relies on six solar-powered CubeSats — each about the size of a toaster oven — to simultaneously observe radio images of low-frequency emission from solar activity and share them via NASA’s Deep Space Network.

The constellation of CubeSats would fly within six miles (9.6 kms) of each other, above Earth’s atmosphere, which otherwise blocks the radio signals SunRISE will observe.

Solar System
NASA is planning to launch a new mission to study how the Sun generates and releases giant space weather storms — known as solar particle storms — into planetary space. Pixabay

Together, the six CubeSats will create 3D maps to pinpoint where giant particle bursts originate on the Sun and how they evolve as they expand outward into space. This, in turn, will help determine what initiates and accelerates these giant jets of radiation.

ALSO READ: Xiaomi’s Wuhan Headquarters Officially Resumes All Operations (Tech Report)

The six individual spacecraft will also work together to map, for the first time, the pattern of magnetic field lines reaching from the Sun out into interplanetary space, NASA said. (IANS)