Friday April 19, 2019

Exposure to Arsenic, Lead May Spike up Risk of Heart Disease

Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, "population-wide strategies to minimise exposure will further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts," the researchers concluded

0
//
Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Even low levels of exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment like arsenic, lead, copper and cadmium pose a significant risk to cardiovascular health, finds a study, led by one of an Indian-origin.

Although often naturally occurring, these contaminants have made their way into water supplies and, via irrigation, into the food chain.

Concern has often focused on the toxicity or carcinogenic properties of the metals, particularly at high doses.

However, the findings, published by The BMJ, showed there is increasing evidence to suggest that heavy metals may have other adverse effects on health – including cardiovascular disease such as heart disease and stroke – even at lower levels of exposure, the researchers said.

“It’s clear from our analysis that there’s a possible link between exposure to heavy metals or metalloids and risk of conditions such as heart disease, even at low doses – and the greater the exposure, the greater the risk,” said lead author Rajiv Chowdhury, from Britain’s University of Cambridge.

Heart Disease
Concern has often focused on the toxicity or carcinogenic properties of the metals, particularly at high doses. Pixabay

“While people shouldn’t be overly worried about any immediate health risk, it should send a message to policymakers that we need to take action to reduce people’s exposure.”

The study “reinforces the (often under-recognised) importance of environmental toxic metals in enhancing global cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioural risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet and inactivity,” the researchers said.

For the study, the team conducted a meta-analysis of 37 studies involving almost 350,000 participants.

Also Read- Honor Launches its Budget Smartphone Honor 7S in India

Chowdhury noted that the study highlighted the potential need for additional worldwide efforts and strategies “to reduce human exposures even in settings where there is a relatively lower average level of exposure.”

Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, “population-wide strategies to minimise exposure will further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts,” the researchers concluded. (IANS)

Next Story

Research Suggest Yo-yo Dieting Can Raise Women’s Heart Disease Risk

The more episodes of weight cycling women reported, the poorer they scored on 'Life's Simple 7', according to the researchers

0
Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Yo-yo dieting — weight cycling, or the cyclical loss and gain of weight — can make it harder for women to control a variety of heart disease risk factors, according to a research.

The study found in case of women losing at least 10 pounds and regaining the weight within a year could be detrimental to heart heath.

Besides achieving a healthy weight, maintaining a consistent body weight is important for lowering heart disease risks.

Earlier research showed similar results in men, with those who weight-cycled having twice the risk of cardiovascular death in middle age.

“Achieving a healthy weight is generally recommended as heart healthy but maintaining weight loss is difficult and fluctuations in weight may make it harder to achieve ideal cardiovascular health,” said Brooke Aggarwal, Assistant Professor at Columbia University in New York.

The results were presented at the American Heart Association’s EPI Lifestyle Scientific Sessions 2019 in Texas.

Many menopausal symptoms that you may aren't aware of can cause much harm to you.
Yo-yo dieting may raise women’s heart disease risk.

For the study, the team examined 485 women (average age 37 years, average body mass index 26, in the overweight range).

Women reported how many times (other than during pregnancies) they had lost at least 10 pounds, only to regain the weight within a year.

Most women (73 per cent) reported at least one episode of yo-yo weight loss, with a range of zero to 20 episodes.

Also Read- Gene Triggering Antibiotic Reaction Risk Identified, Says Study

They were assessed on American Heart Association’s ‘Life’s Simple 7’ — a measure of how well people control major heart disease risk factors, including body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, smoking, physical activity and diet.

The more episodes of weight cycling women reported, the poorer they scored on ‘Life’s Simple 7’, according to the researchers. (IANS)