Monday March 25, 2019
Home Lead Story Facebook expa...

Facebook expands job application feature to 40 nations

Businesses can also attract the right applicants and hire quickly. Page admins can create job posts directly from their Page with details like job title, job type, salary and more

0
//
Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook needs to fix itself. Pixabay
  • Facebook expands job application feature
  • The platform is now available in more than 40 countries
  • The feature will be a great use for all the job seekers around the world

To help local businesses hire the right people, Facebook has expanded the ability to apply to jobs directly on its platform to more than 40 countries.

Rolled out in the US and Canada in 2017, Facebook’s job application feature is different from Microsoft-owned LinkedIn as it is focused to draw in candidates for small- and medium-size businesses.

Facebook has always been a supporter for small and medium-size businesses.
Facebook has always been a supporter for small and medium-size businesses.

Facebook, however, did not elaborate on which 40 countries were part of this expansion.

“Local businesses strengthen our communities and create more than 60 percent of new jobs. We want to help people find those jobs and help local businesses hire the right people,” Alex Himel, Vice President of Local at Facebook, said in a blog post on Thursday.

In an online poll of 5,000 adults conducted by tech and media company Morning Consult, one in four people in the US said they searched for found a job using Facebook.

Also Read: Facebook announces huge investment to empower community leaders

“Since introducing job postings on Facebook in the US and Canada, we’ve built new features for businesses like the ability to create job posts on mobile, manage applications, and schedule interviews,” Himel said.

Job seekers can also set up job alerts for the type of roles they’re interested in.

You can find jobs in the Jobs dashboard at facebook.com/jobs and the “Jobs” option in the “Explore” section on mobile, by clicking the Jobs icon in Marketplace, or visiting the Jobs tab of a business’ Page.

“When you’re ready to apply for a role, you can create an application, which will populate with job history and other information in your Facebook profile,” the blog post read.

Facebook invests big in this new Program. AFP
Facebook invests big in this new Program. AFP

You can edit your application before you submit it. Once you finish applying, a Messenger conversation will open with the business’ Page so you can have direct contact with the employer and confirm when your information has been received.

According to Facebook, businesses will only be able to see the information you provide them directly, and what’s available publicly on your Facebook profile.

Also Read: Facebook acquires biometric ID verification startup

“To stay on top of the type of job you’re interested in, you can also subscribe to alerts,” Himel said.

Businesses can also attract the right applicants and hire quickly. Page admins can create job posts directly from their Page with details like job title, job type (full-time, intern, part-time), salary and more

“Job posts will appear in multiple places on Facebook, including on a business’ Page, in the Jobs dashboard, in Marketplace, and in News Feed,” the company said.

Since 2011, Facebook has invested more than $1 billion to help local businesses grow and help people find jobs. IANS

Next Story

AI Couldn’t Catch NZ Attack Video Streaming: Facebook

Facebook said it was exploring how AI could help it react faster to this kind of content on a live streamed video

0
Facebook, photos
This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facing flak for failure to block the live broadcast of the New Zealand terrorist attack last week, Facebook on Thursday said that its Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools were not “perfect” to detect the horrific video.

Vowing to improve its technology, the social networking giant, however, ruled out adding a time delay to Facebook Live, similar to the broadcast delay sometimes used by TV stations.

“There are millions of Live broadcasts daily, which means a delay would not help address the problem due to the sheer number of videos,” Guy Rosen, Facebook’s Vice President of Integrity, said in a statement.

“More importantly, given the importance of user reports, adding a delay would only further slow down videos getting reported, reviewed and first responders being alerted to provide help on the ground,” Rosen added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcast graphic footage of the New Zealand shooting via Facebook Live for 17 minutes, which was later shared in millions on other social media platforms, including Twitter and YouTube.

Fifty people were killed and dozens injured in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

Facebook, data, vietnam
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

The circulation of the video on social media platforms attracted widespread criticism from different quarters.

In a letter to CEOs of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson asked the technology companies to brief the US Congress on March 27 regarding their response to dissemination of the video on their platforms.

Thompson also warned the technology companies that unless they do better in removing violent content, the Congress could consider policies to bar such content on social media.

Also Read- Finland Probing Nokia Phones Sending Data to China

Facebook on Thursday said it was exploring how AI could help it react faster to this kind of content on a live streamed video.

“AI has made massive progress over the years and in many areas, which has enabled us to proactively detect the vast majority of the content we remove. But it’s not perfect.

“However, this particular video did not trigger our automatic detection systems,” Rosen said, referring to the New Zealand attack video. (IANS)