Wednesday January 16, 2019
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Facebook expands job application feature to 40 nations

Businesses can also attract the right applicants and hire quickly. Page admins can create job posts directly from their Page with details like job title, job type, salary and more

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Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook needs to fix itself. Pixabay
  • Facebook expands job application feature
  • The platform is now available in more than 40 countries
  • The feature will be a great use for all the job seekers around the world

To help local businesses hire the right people, Facebook has expanded the ability to apply to jobs directly on its platform to more than 40 countries.

Rolled out in the US and Canada in 2017, Facebook’s job application feature is different from Microsoft-owned LinkedIn as it is focused to draw in candidates for small- and medium-size businesses.

Facebook has always been a supporter for small and medium-size businesses.
Facebook has always been a supporter for small and medium-size businesses.

Facebook, however, did not elaborate on which 40 countries were part of this expansion.

“Local businesses strengthen our communities and create more than 60 percent of new jobs. We want to help people find those jobs and help local businesses hire the right people,” Alex Himel, Vice President of Local at Facebook, said in a blog post on Thursday.

In an online poll of 5,000 adults conducted by tech and media company Morning Consult, one in four people in the US said they searched for found a job using Facebook.

Also Read: Facebook announces huge investment to empower community leaders

“Since introducing job postings on Facebook in the US and Canada, we’ve built new features for businesses like the ability to create job posts on mobile, manage applications, and schedule interviews,” Himel said.

Job seekers can also set up job alerts for the type of roles they’re interested in.

You can find jobs in the Jobs dashboard at facebook.com/jobs and the “Jobs” option in the “Explore” section on mobile, by clicking the Jobs icon in Marketplace, or visiting the Jobs tab of a business’ Page.

“When you’re ready to apply for a role, you can create an application, which will populate with job history and other information in your Facebook profile,” the blog post read.

Facebook invests big in this new Program. AFP
Facebook invests big in this new Program. AFP

You can edit your application before you submit it. Once you finish applying, a Messenger conversation will open with the business’ Page so you can have direct contact with the employer and confirm when your information has been received.

According to Facebook, businesses will only be able to see the information you provide them directly, and what’s available publicly on your Facebook profile.

Also Read: Facebook acquires biometric ID verification startup

“To stay on top of the type of job you’re interested in, you can also subscribe to alerts,” Himel said.

Businesses can also attract the right applicants and hire quickly. Page admins can create job posts directly from their Page with details like job title, job type (full-time, intern, part-time), salary and more

“Job posts will appear in multiple places on Facebook, including on a business’ Page, in the Jobs dashboard, in Marketplace, and in News Feed,” the company said.

Since 2011, Facebook has invested more than $1 billion to help local businesses grow and help people find jobs. IANS

Next Story

Facebook To Invest $300Mn In Local News Partnerships, Programs

The idea behind the investments, Brown said, is to look “holistically at how a given publisher can define a business model."

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Facebook, dating
Facebook owned photo-messaging app Instagram already supports the "Unsend" capability VOA

Facebook says it is investing $300 million over the next three years in local news programs, partnerships and other initiatives.

The money will go toward reporting grants for local newsrooms, expanding Facebook’s program to help local newsrooms with subscription business models and investing in nonprofits aimed at supporting local news.

The move comes at a difficult time for the news industry, which is facing falling profits and print readership. Facebook, like Google, has also been partly blamed for the ongoing decline in newspapers’ share of advertising dollars as people and advertisers have moved online.

Facebook, Fake News
A user gets ready to launch Facebook on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. Facebook has made changes to fight false information, including de-emphasizing proven false stories in people’s feeds so others are less likely to see them. VOA

Campbell Brown, Facebook’s head of global news partnerships, acknowledges the company “can’t uninvent the internet,” but says it wants to work with publishers to help them succeed on and off the social network.

“The industry is going through a massive transition that has been underway for a long time,” she said. “None of us have quite figured out ultimately what the future of journalism is going to look like but we want to be part of helping find a solution.”

Facebook has increased its focus on local news in the past year after starting off 2018 with the announcement that it was generally de-emphasizing news stories and videos in people’s feeds on the social network in favor of posts from their friends.

At the same time, though, the company has been cautiously testing out ways to boost local news stories users are interested in and initiatives to support the broader industry. It launched a feature called “Today In” that shows people local news and information , including missing-person alerts, road closures, crime reports and school announcements, expanding it to hundreds of cities around the U.S. and a few in Australia.

Facebook, social media
Silhouettes of laptop users are seen next to a screen projection of Facebook logo in this illustration. VOA

The push to support local news comes as Facebook, which is based in Menlo Park, California, tries to shake off its reputation as a hotbed for misinformation and elections-meddling. The company says users have been asking to see more local content that is relevant to them, including news stories as well as community information such as road closings during a snowstorm.

The $300 million investment includes a $5 million grant to the nonprofit Pulitzer Center to launch “Bringing Stories Home,” a fund that will provide local U.S. newsrooms with reporting grants to support coverage of local issues. There’s also a $2 million investment in Report for America as part of a partnership aiming to place 1,000 journalists in local newsrooms across the country over the next five years.

The idea behind the investments, Brown said, is to look “holistically at how a given publisher can define a business model. Facebook can’t be the only answer, the only solution — we don’t want the publisher to be dependent on Facebook.”

Also Read: Democratic Lawmakers Further Investigate Russia’s Involvement In U.S. Election

Fran Wills, CEO of the Local Media Consortium, which is receiving $1 million together with the Local Media Association to help their member newsrooms develop new revenue streams, said she is optimistic the investment will help.

“I think they are recognizing that trusted, credible content is of benefit not only to local publishers but to them,” she said. (VOA)