Wednesday December 12, 2018

Playing Golf May Boost Longevity And Cut Stroke Risk

The sport needs to be more inclusive and welcoming of people from all walks of life and ethnic backgrounds, the researchers said

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Golf
Play golf to boost longevity, cut stroke risk. Pixabay
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Want a long life? Playing golf regularly can boost longevity as well as reduce the risk factors for heart disease and stroke, a panel of international experts has claimed, while stressing on the need to make the sport more inclusive.

The panel, led by the University of Edinburgh, showed that playing golf, which is good for both the mind and body, can also boost strength and balance in older adults.

The sport is also associated with good mental health and improving the overall health of those with disabilities.

It could be because golf is sociable and gets people outdoors to connect with nature.

It can also provide moderate intensity aerobic physical activity, and its health benefits are greatest for players (and spectators) who walk round the course rather than opt for a golf cart, researchers including Andrew D Murray, from Edinburgh’s Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, explained.

While the risk of injury while playing golf is moderate, compared with other sports, golfers may be more at risk of skin cancer, he noted.

Golf
Golf (Representational image). Pixabay

The researchers suggested that golfers should aim to play for 150 minutes per week.

Players should do warm-up or strengthening exercises to cut the risk of injury and use sun-cream and wear collared shirts or blouses to minimise the risk of skin cancer,  Murray recommended.

In the study appearing in British Journal of Sports Medicine, the panel drew on a systematic review of the available published evidence (342 eligible studies) and discussions among an international working group of 25 experts in public health and health policy, and industry leaders.

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While around 60 million people play golf at least twice a year, the sport is often perceived as expensive, male dominated, difficult to learn, and not a game for the young or those on the lower rungs of the social ladder.

The sport needs to be more inclusive and welcoming of people from all walks of life and ethnic backgrounds, the researchers said. (IANS)

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Exercise May help to Reduce Stroke Risk in Menopausal Women

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause

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Exercise
Exercise may cut the risk of stroke in menopausal women. Pixabay

Mid-aged women transitioning to menopause may be able to lower their risk of developing stroke, heart disease and Type-2 diabetes if they exercise more or eat a low calorie diet, suggests a research.

The study showed that physically active women were less likely to get incidents of metabolic syndrome than inactive women.

Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase the chances of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Genetic factors, excess body fat, and lack of exercise can add to its development.

Patients with metabolic syndrome are diagnosed when they have three or more of these risk factors — large amount of abdominal body fat, low (“good”) cholesterol, high levels of fat in the blood, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose.

Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

“Previous studies have largely focused on cardiovascular disease and Type-2 diabetes in postmenopausal women. This study is unique because it focuses on an earlier stage in women’s lives, the menopausal transition in midlife, to potentially prevent such diseases from occurring,” said Jennifer S. Lee, Associate Professor at the Stanford Health Care in the US.

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause.

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They identified patterns of cardiometabolic risk and found central obesity to be the most common factor for causing metabolic syndrome.

“Discovering which modifiable factors like physical activity and a lower calorie diet are more common in midlife women who recover from metabolic syndrome, in this study, could better inform what preventive strategies to consider in women earlier in their lives,” Lee noted. (IANS)