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Google Removes Its Ban From Cryptocurrency

After Facebook and Google, Microsoft also removed advertisements showing cryptocurrencies and related products from its Bing search engine.

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Google comes up with a new feature

 Google is tweaking its ban on cryptocurrency-related advertisements it put in place earlier this year, planning to allow regulated cryptocurrency exchanges to buy ads in the US and Japan, the media reported.

Google in March announced a ban on advertisements for cryptocurrencies and other “speculative financial products” across its ad platforms.

“The Internet giant’s updated policy applies to advertisers all over the world and it will go into effect next month,” CNBC reported on Tuesday.

However, the ads can only run in the US and Japan, and interested parties will need to apply for certification to serve ads in each country individually, the report added.

Google, cryptocurrency
A Google logo is seen at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, VOA

“Google’s parent company Alphabet gets roughly 86 per cent of its total revenue from advertising. The company booked more than $54 billion in ad revenue in the first half of 2018,” said the report.

Also Read: Google Rolls Out a Major Update Revamping Its ‘Feed Feature”

Facebook imposed a similar ban in January, but has subsequently lifted some restrictions.

After Facebook and Google, Microsoft also removed advertisements showing cryptocurrencies and related products from its Bing search engine. (IANS)

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Facebook Tracking Location Data of Users Who Threaten its Employees

Facebook has 2.7 billion users across its services.

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Facebook
Facebook has been monitoring and tracking locations of those users who can pose threat to its employees or physical properties. Pixabay

Facebook has been monitoring and tracking locations of those users who can pose threat to its employees or physical properties, the media reported.

According to a report in CNBC on Thursday, the tracking of users begins when the Facebook security team finds they are making “credible threats on its social network”.

The tracking is done by using location data taken from the user’s Facebook app or an IP address collected by the social network when a user is active on Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg, facebook
Facebook CEO receives threatening comments from users.

The locations of users are only accessible after they were placed on a ‘Be On the Lookout’ (BOLO) list after their threats are deemed credible. The list is updated nearly once a week.

“The company mines its social network for threatening comments, and in some cases uses its products to track the location of people it believes present a credible threat,” said the report.

Facebook has 2.7 billion users across its services. “That means that if just 0.01 per cent of users make a threat, Facebook is still dealing with 270,000 potential security risks, the report added.

Users who publicly threaten the company — including posting threatening comments to company executives like CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg — are added to the list.

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Facebook has 2.7 billion users across its services. Pixabay

“Our physical security team exists to keep employees safe,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement.

ALSO READ: Facebook Negotiating Multi-billion Dollar Fine With US Agency: Report

“We have strict processes designed to protect people’s privacy and adhere to all data privacy laws and Facebook’s terms of service. Any suggestion our onsite physical security team has overstepped is absolutely false,” the spokesperson was quoted as saying.

Depending on the threat, Facebook’s security teams can take other actions, such as stationing security guards, escorting a BOLO user off campus or alerting law enforcement. (IANS)