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Ham Radio Operators to help Check Fishermen along West Bengal coast receive Weather Updates in the deep seas

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A fisherman in India (representational image), Wikimedia
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Kolkata, May 11, 2017: Ham radio operators will help check whether fishermen along West Bengal coast receive weather updates via radio broadcast in the deep seas, an operator said on Thursday.

A joint inspection for measuring the signal strength of All India Radio broadcast in the deep seas will be held on May 14 and 15 by the Coast Guard, AIR, state fisheries department, fishermen’s association, and ham radio operators.

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“Around a year back, 39 fishermen went missing in the deep sea. The reason was they didn’t hear the weather report on radio. We will investigate whether they are receiving these important transmissions,” Ambarish Nag Biswas of the West Bengal Radio Club (Amateur Club) said.

Through ham radio one can talk across cities, around the world, or even into space, all without the internet or cell phones. Ham radio operators or hams can swing into action in times of disaster, when regular communications channels fail, and assist disaster management agencies.

Biswas said the hams will also educate the fishermen on using the Very High Frequency (VHF) radio.

“Although every fishing vessel has a VHF Radio, due to lack of knowledge they are not maintained properly,” he said. (IANS)

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Extreme weather risk high despite Paris Agreement: Study

The study published in the journal Science Advances showed that meeting the Paris Agreement's goal was likely to reduce the area of the globe that experiences greater than threefold increases in the probability of record-setting events

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The study published in the journal Science Advances showed that meeting the Paris Agreement's goal was likely to reduce the area of the globe that experiences greater than threefold increases in the probability of record-setting events. Wikimedia Commons
The study published in the journal Science Advances showed that meeting the Paris Agreement's goal was likely to reduce the area of the globe that experiences greater than threefold increases in the probability of record-setting events. Wikimedia Commons
  • The Paris Agreement saw nearly all the countries in the world set an aspirational target of capping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius
  • The researchers found that if countries kept their minimum commitment to limit global warming to 2-3 degrees Celsius

Meeting the Paris Agreement’s goal of keeping the global-scale warming this century to less than 2 degrees Celsius could still lead to extreme weather events compared to the present, claims a study.

The Paris Agreement saw nearly all the countries in the world set an aspirational target of capping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius, Xinhua news agency reported on Thursday.

But even if the target was reached, “we still will be living in a climate that has a substantially greater probability of unprecedented events than the one we’re in now”, said Noah Diffenbaugh, a climate scientist at Stanford University and the paper’s lead author.

Also Read: Climate Change: Earth in Danger

The study published in the journal Science Advances showed that meeting the Paris Agreement’s goal was likely to reduce the area of the globe that experiences greater than threefold increases in the probability of record-setting events.

However, even at this reduced level of global warming, the world was still likely to see increases in record-setting events compared to the present.

The researchers found that if countries kept their minimum commitment to limit global warming to 2-3 degrees Celsius, it was still likely to result in a more than fivefold increase in the probability of record-breaking warm nights over approximately 50 percent of Europe, and more than 25 percent of East Asia.

Also Read: Global warming to continue for thousands of years

A 2-3 degree global warming would also likely result in a greater than three-fold increase in record-breaking wet days over more than 35 percent of North America, Europe and East Asia, the study said. (IANS)

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