Wednesday September 19, 2018

Heart patients who walk faster hospitalised less

Each 1 km/hour increase in walking speed resulted in a 19 per cent reduction in the likelihood of being hospitalised

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Cyanotic heart disease. Wikimedia
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Increasing the pace of walking may bring some added benefits as researchers have found that faster-walking patients with heart disease are hospitalised less.

“The faster the walking speed, the lower the risk of hospitalisation and the shorter the length of hospital stay,” said study author Carlotta Merlo, a researcher at the University of Ferrara in Italy.

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“Since reduced walking speed is a marker of limited mobility, which has been linked to decreased physical activity, we assume that fast walkers in the study are also fast walkers in real life,” she added.

The study was conducted in 1,078 hypertensive patients, of whom 85 per cent also had coronary heart disease and 15 per cent also had valve disease.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease is simply known as heartburn. Wikimedia Commons
Walking fast can reduce heart damage. Wikimedia Commons

A total of 359 patients were identified as slow walkers, 362 intermediate and 357 fast walkers. The researchers recorded the number of all-cause hospitalisations and length of stay of the participants over the next three years.

During the three year period, 182 of the slow walkers (51 per cent) had at least one hospitalisation, compared to 160 (44 per cent) of the intermediate walkers, and 110 (31 per cent) of the fast walkers, according to the study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

The slow, intermediate and fast walking groups spent a total of 4,186, 2,240, and 990 days in hospital over the three years, respectively. The average length of hospital stay for each patient was 23, 14, and 9 days for the slow, intermediate and fast walkers, respectively.

Each 1 km/hour increase in walking speed resulted in a 19 per cent reduction in the likelihood of being hospitalised during the three-year period. Compared to the slow walkers, fast walkers had a 37 per cent lower likelihood of hospitalisation in three years, the findings showed.

“Walking is the most popular type of exercise in adults. It is free, does not require special training, and can be done almost anywhere. Even short, but regular, walks have substantial health benefits. Our study shows that the benefits are even greater when the pace of walking is increased,” Merlo said. IANS

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Walking- The Key to Good Health

Try to incorporate walking into your day-to-day life. That way, walking becomes a natural activity you do all the time

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A couple walking, Pixabay

Walking is enjoyable, helps in burning fat and it is pocket-friendly too, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

Simon Barnett of Ramblers, Britain’s walking charity that promotes walking for health and pleasure, said: “Most of us will have over indulged during the festive period and many of us will make resolutions to get more active in the New Year, but our good intentions often fall by the wayside.”

“Stepping out for a walk is a cheap and fun way to achieve the recommended 150 minutes of physical activity a week. You can enjoy all the beautiful scenery Britain has to offer and by chatting whilst you walk, you soon forget that you’re doing exercise.”

Walking
Walk your way to good health.

“Walking is especially great if you’re new to exercise, as it’s gentle and can be built up slowly. So forget about the expensive gym memberships and make a resolution you can stick to in 2014: Get walking,” added Barnett.

One can try a group walk.

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Also as your fitness improves, challenge yourself to longer walks. Stay motivated by setting yourself achievable goals.

Try to incorporate walking into your day-to-day life. That way, walking becomes a natural activity you do all the time. (IANS)

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