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Usage of technology to seamlessly impart education to all students. Unsplash

With over 50 per cent (564.5 million) of the Indian population connected to the internet, the shift to ‘activity’ as opposed to ‘location’ has become more defined. According to a study every one-in-five respondent orders groceries from their beds or while browsing what is on the television, or even on their smartphones while travelling! This is the power of technology these days!

“A New Sense of Place”, a study conducted by Script (a Godrej Venture) reveals how technology is melding work and play for Indians across cities and generations.


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The report highlights transformations in lifestyle habits and consumer behaviour. For instance, the living room, which used to be the hub for evening gatherings and cable TV entertainment, is no more the primary choice to watch a movie or TV show. In fact, the survey revealed that 76 per cent admitted to not being in their living rooms if they were watching a show.

The first choice of content consumption for both men and women are the bedroom, followed by the kitchen and dining room for only 22 per cent female respondents, and the living room for 26 per cent male respondents. This has, no doubt, given rise to new hangout spots: dining sets, comfy new recliners and sofas which extend to beds, and of course bean bags.


The group of technophiles is more likely to engage in every category of digital activity. Pixabay

Rajat Mathur, Business Head, Script, said: “Technology has brought about a freedom of living which was previously inaccessible. Mobile phones are now the primary screen for today’s connected Indian consumers. As a brand, the objective of Script has always been to enable a fluid living experience. At present, people are unbound and empowered, in each moment, to choose the roles and identities that suit their mood, habit or quirk. The physical spaces we live in are now redefined and evolved to suit a multifunctional generation!”

ALSO READ: Usage Of Various Technology Tools For Smart Policing To Fight Crime

The study also found that the concept of a workplace, which has now evolved into a person’s device, not the place they go to, is hiding interesting secrets! Nearly half of the respondents admitted to secretly watching content on OTT platforms while at work. Professionally employed Indians now spend 2.35 hours on social media during work hours, as compared to 1.15 hours spent on social media outside work. Also, half the respondents responded to personal messages during work meetings.

Interestingly, “being at work” is not considered a bad thing – half of millennials and Gen Z’ers communicated with their bosses on social media while on vacation. At the same time, Indians are not shying away from taking work home – as 67 per cent millennials and 69 per cent Gen Z’ers responded to work-related messages and calls from home. (IANS)


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