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HP Launches Game Changing 3D Printing Technology

HP is also partnering with California-based Parmatech, an ATW Company, to expand mass production of metal jet parts.

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HP India
HP also unveiled 65-inch gaming display with soundbar at CES 2019. Flickr

Keeping its promise to infuse life into 3D metal printing and transform the $12 trillion manufacturing industry, tech giant HP Inc on Monday launched the worlds most advanced 3D printing technology for the mass manufacturing of production-grade metal parts.

Called HP Metal Jet, the technology is up to 50 times more productive — delivering low-cost, high-quality mechanically functional parts for the auto, industrial and medical industries to begin with.

“HP has helped lead the transformation by pioneering the 3D mass production of plastic parts and we are now doubling down with HP Metal Jet, a breakthrough metals 3D printing technology,” said Dion Weisler, CEO and President, HP Inc.

The implications are huge as the auto, industrial and medical sectors alone produce billions of metal parts each year.

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HP Metal Jet solutions will be offered at under $399,000 and begin shipping in 2020 (IANS)

 

HP Metal Jet will start with producing stainless steel finished parts. In the first half of 2019, customers will be able to upload 3D printing design files and receive industrial-grade parts in large quantities from the new Metal Jet Production Service.

Commercial HP Metal Jet solutions will be offered at under $399,000 and begin shipping in 2020 to early customers and with broad availability in 2021, the company announced.

In an industry-first collaboration, HP is partnering with UK-based GKN Powder Metallurgy to deploy HP Metal Jet in their factories to produce functional metal parts for auto and industrial leaders, including Volkswagen and Wilo.

“HP’s new Metal Jet technology enables us to expand our business by taking on new opportunities that were previously cost prohibitive,” said Peter Oberparleiter, CEO of GKN Powder Metallurgy.

Volkswagen is integrating HP Metal Jet into its long-term design and production roadmap.

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3d printed interactive chess pieces on a Microsoft Surface. Flickr

As new platforms such as electric vehicles enter mass production, HP Metal Jet is expected to be leveraged for additional applications such as the light-weighting of fully safety certified metal parts.

“By 2025, the brands of Volkswagen Group will have introduced 80 new electric modes,” said Dr Martin Goede, Head of Technology Planning and Development, Volkswagen.

“A big advantage of an additive technology like HP Metal Jet is it allows us to produce many of these parts without first having to build manufacturing tools,” he added.

HP is also partnering with California-based Parmatech, an ATW Company, to expand mass production of metal jet parts.

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Example of 3D prining. The wrenches are printed through 3D printer. Flickr

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“We are excited to deploy HP Metal Jet in our factories and begin manufacturing complex parts, such as surgical scissors and endoscopic surgical jaws,” said Rob Hall, President of Parmatech.

Parmatech is a world leader in metal injection molding and has been a metals manufacturing pioneer for more than 40 years. (IANS)

Next Story

Design Flaw could Open Bluetooth Devices to Hacking

Consider a wearable health and fitness tracker, smart thermostat, smart speaker or smart home assistant

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While the magnitude of that vulnerability varies, we found it to be a consistent problem among Bluetooth low energy devices when communicating with mobile apps. Pixabay

Be it a fitness tracker, smartwatch, smart speaker or smart home assistant, the way Bluetooth devices communicate with the mobile apps leaves room for hackers to steal sensitive personal information, new research has found.

An inherent design flaw makes mobile apps that work with Bluetooth Low Energy devices vulnerable to hacking, said the study described at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Conference on Computer and Communications Security held in London from November 11-15.

“There is a fundamental flaw that leaves these devices vulnerable — first when they are initially paired to a mobile app, and then again when they are operating,” said Zhiqiang Lin, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at The Ohio State University in the US.

“While the magnitude of that vulnerability varies, we found it to be a consistent problem among Bluetooth low energy devices when communicating with mobile apps,” Lin added.

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An inherent design flaw makes mobile apps that work with Bluetooth Low Energy devices vulnerable to hacking, said the study described at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Conference on Computer and Communications Security held in London from November 11-15. Pixabay

Consider a wearable health and fitness tracker, smart thermostat, smart speaker or smart home assistant.

Each first communicates with the apps on your mobile device by broadcasting something called a UUID — a universally unique identifier.

That identifier allows the corresponding apps on your phone to recognise the Bluetooth device, creating a connection that allows your phone and device to talk to one another.

But that identifier itself is also embedded into the mobile app code. Otherwise, mobile apps would not be able to recognise the device. However, such UUIDs in the mobile apps make the devices vulnerable to a fingerprinting attack, the research team found.

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“At a minimum, a hacker could determine whether you have a particular Bluetooth device, such as a smart speaker, at your home, by identifying whether or not your smart device is broadcasting the particular UUIDs identified from the corresponding mobile apps,” Lin said.

“But in some cases in which no encryption is involved or encryption is used improperly between mobile apps and devices, the attacker would be able to ‘listen in’ on your conversation and collect that data.”

Still, that doesn’t mean you should throw your smartwatch away.

“We think the problem should be relatively easy to fix, and we’ve made recommendations to app developers and to Bluetooth industry groups,” he said.

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There is a fundamental flaw that leaves these devices vulnerable — first when they are initially paired to a mobile app, and then again when they are operating. Pixabay

If app developers tightened defences in that initial authentication, the problem could be resolved, Lin said.

The team reported their findings to developers of vulnerable apps and to the Bluetooth Special Interest Group, and created an automated tool to evaluate all of the Bluetooth Low Energy apps in the Google Play Store – 18,166 at the time of their research.

In addition to building the databases directly from mobile apps of the Bluetooth devices in the market, the team’s evaluation also identified 1,434 vulnerable apps that allow unauthorised access. Their analysis did not include apps in the Apple Store.

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“It was alarming,” he said. “The potential for privacy invasion is high.” (IANS)