Friday October 18, 2019

Less Than 7 Hours of Sleep Bad for Your Heart, Warn Researchers

The results suggest that microRNAs in blood could be used as a marker of cardiovascular disease in people with insufficient sleep

0
//
Time
Soothing colours, right scent aid sound sleep. Pixabay

People who sleep less than seven hours each night are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease, warn researchers.

The findings, published in the journal Experimental Physiology, show that people who sleep fewer than seven hours per night have lower blood levels of three physiological regulators, or microRNAs, which influence gene expression and play a key role in maintaining vascular health.

“This study proposes a new potential mechanism through which sleep influences heart health and overall physiology,” said Christopher DeSouza, Professor at University of Colorado in the US.

For the study, the research team took blood samples from a small group of healthy men and women, age 44 to 62, who had filled out questionnaires about their sleep habits.

While half of the participants slept seven to 8.5 hours nightly, the other half slept five to 6.8 hours every night.

sleeping
Less than 7 hours of sleep linked to hardened arteries. Pixabay

The research team measured the expression of nine microRNAs previously associated with inflammation, immune function or vascular health.

They found that people with insufficient sleep had 40 to 60 per cent lower circulating levels of miR-125A, miR-126, and miR-146a than those who slept enough.

“Why seven or eight hours seems to be the magic number is unclear. However, it is plausible that people need at least seven hours of sleep per night to maintain levels of important physiological regulators, such as microRNAs,” DeSouza added.

Also Read- Soy-rich Food Decrease Risk of Bone Fractures in Breast Cancer Survivors

“They are like cellular brakes, so if beneficial microRNAs are lacking that can have a big impact on the health of the cell,” DeSouza said.

The results suggest that microRNAs in blood could be used as a marker of cardiovascular disease in people with insufficient sleep. (IANS)

Next Story

Heavier Babies are More Prone to Childhood Allergies: Research

For the study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the research team carried out a systematic review assessing past studies in humans

0
Babies
For each kilogram increase in birth weight of Babies, there was a 44 per cent increase in the risk that a child had food allergies or a 17 per cent increase in the risk that they had eczema. Pixabay

Parents, take note. Researchers have found that heavier babies are more likely to suffer childhood food allergies or eczema.

For the study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the research team carried out a systematic review assessing past studies in humans.

After screening more than 15,000 studies, they identified 42 that included data on more than two million allergy sufferers.

“We analysed the associations between birth weight, corrected for gestational age, and the incidence of allergic diseases in children and adults,” said Kathy Gatford from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

“For each kilogram increase in birth weight there was a 44 per cent increase in the risk that a child had food allergies or a 17 per cent increase in the risk that they had eczema,” Gatford said.

According to the researchers, they analysed studies that included over 2.1 million people affected by allergic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema, nearly 70,000 people affected by food allergies and over 100,000 people with allergic rhinitis or hay fever.

Most of the studies were in children from developed countries and most were European.

babies
Study Says that heavier Babies are more likely to suffer childhood food allergies or eczema. Pixabay

“Allergic diseases including eczema, hay fever, food allergies, anaphylaxis and asthma are estimated to affect 30-40 per cent of the world’s population,” Gatford said..

“It is increasingly clear that genetics alone do not explain risks of developing allergies, and that environmental exposures before and around birth can programme individuals to increased or decreased risk of allergies,” Gatford added.

ALSO READ: Cow Numbers in India Witnesses a Sharp Increase Since 2012

Most of the allergies in these studies were assessed in young children. (IANS)