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Mobile Applications Ensure Public Safety in Rio De Janerio

Twin mobile applications call for public safety cautioning users about terror stricken areas

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Mobile Applications
Mobile applications ensuring public safety. VOA
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  • ‘Onde tem tiroteio RJ’ aims to track gunfire and fosters public safety
  • The two security apps Onde tem tiroteio RJ together “Fogo Cruzado,” or Cross Fire with battles guns and bullets in Rio de Janeiro
  • Apps help common people to avoid violence inflicted areas

July 16, 2017:  Onde tem tiroteio RJ and Frogo Cruzado are mobile applications, created by a group of volunteers aims to show the distraught areas of Rio de Janeiro, saving many innocent lives from stray bullets. Street violence and mob shooting have become a major threat to many big cities and most significantly in Brazil’s Rio de Janeiro. These mobile applications inform its users where a shooting has occurred and advise to stay away from it. The app Onde tem tiroteio RJ is also responsible for doing the same via social media like Instagram, Facebook and others, as reported by BBG Direct.

Enrique Coelho Caamano, the creator of Onde Tem Tiroteio – “Where are the Firefights” is more concerned with the public lives, the lives of the common mass often entangled in massive gunfire. According to the sources, the app has now approx 3 million users, which is almost half the population of the area.

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Our job here is not to denounce anyone, we do not have a direct focus on the police or on the drug gangs,” Henrique Coelho Caamaño, a volunteer of the Onde Tem Tiroteio app, said this week. “Our focus is really to get people out of the way of stray bullets.” The rampaged areas can now be avoided by the common people all thanks to Onde Tem Tiroteio app.

Mobile Applications
The apps keep people updated about the areas to avoid. Pixabay.
  • Fogo Cruzado lets the users know about the time, date and number of fatalities
  • Mobile applications break stereotypes by emphasizing that human lives matter.

Rio de Janeiro one step ahead in public safety and development.

Fogo Cruzado: The “Fogo Cruzado,” or Cross Fire, an application created by Amnesty International and local researcher, is similar to Onde Tem Tiroteio RJ which also keeps the civilians informed about the bullet strained area. The app is also responsible for protecting the safety of the people frequently falling prey to stray bullets. Both the applications are instrumental in maintaining the security of the civilians long used to random gunfire.

BBC reports that around 42,000 people were shot dead in 2012, the “highest” in the history of 35 years. More than half of the victims are the young population with the northern state lagoas being the most violent. These apps come as saviors amidst the sound of firefights ravaging the city on a routined basis. There has been a steady growth of violent crimes by 11% this year as confirmed by VOA News. More than 23,000 people have killed in the first five months of 2017. The applications send reports based on the informations given by eyewitnesses, media and police accounts.

– prepared by Puja Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter @pujas1994

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Blind Facebook employee is developing tech for sightless

At Facebook, he works on features to help people with disabilities use the platform.

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A visually impaired Facebook employee is developing technology to make Facebook more fun for the sightless. Pixabay
A visually impaired Facebook employee is developing technology to make Facebook more fun for the sightless. Pixabay
  • A blind Facebook employee is developing AI to make social network for sightless fun
  • He is developing AI which will verbalise images and videos
  • This technology will enable alt-text for images and videos

A blind Facebook employee is developing a technology that will use Artificial Intelligence (AI) to verbalise the content of an image or video and enable the visually impaired to “see” and determine appropriate content for people and advertisers.

Facebook engineer Matt King is leading a project that is making solutions for visually impaired people on the platform that could eventually be used to identify images and videos that violate Facebook’s terms of use or that advertisers want to avoid.

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This feature will verbalise images and videos for the visually impaired. Image Source: Reuters
This feature will verbalise images and videos for the visually impaired. Image Source: Reuters

“More than two billion photos are shared across Facebook every single day. That’s a situation where a machine-based solution adds a lot more value than a human-based solution ever could,” CNBC quoted King as saying late on Saturday.

King, who was born with a degenerative eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa, lost his vision by the time he got his degree and started working at IBM with the tech giant’s accessibility projects.

He worked on a screen reader to help visually impaired people “see” what is on their screens either through audio cues or a braille device. IBM eventually developed the first screen reader for a graphical interface.

He worked with the accessibility team till Facebook hired him from IBM in 2015.

The man behind this development is Matt King.
The man behind this development is Matt King.

At Facebook, he works on features to help people with disabilities use the platform, like adding captions to videos or coming up with ways to navigate the site using only audio cues.

“Anybody who has any kind of disability can benefit from Facebook. They can develop beneficial connections and understand their disability doesn’t have to define them, to limit them,” King said.

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One of his main projects is “automated alt-text,” which describes audibly what is in Facebook images.

When automated alt-text was launched in April 2016, it was only available in five languages on the iOS app. Today it is available in over 29 languages on Facebook on the web, iOS and Android.

Facebook is available in more than 29 languages across the world. Pixabay
Facebook is available in more than 29 languages across the world. Pixabay

“The things people post most frequently kind of has a limited vocabulary associated with it,” the Facebook engineer said.

“It makes it possible for us to have one of those situations where if you can tackle 20 per cent of the solution, it tackles 80 per cent of the problem. It’s getting that last 20 per cent which is a lot of work, but we’re getting there,” he said.

In December 2017, Facebook pushed an automatic alt-text update that used facial recognition to help visually impaired people find out who is in photos. IANS