Tuesday January 28, 2020

Molecule Found that Helps Synchronize Absorption of Nutrients in Gut with Rhythms of Day-Night Light Cycle

The team also found that microbes programme these so-called circadian rhythms by activating a protein named "histone deacetylase 3" (HDAC3)

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Molecule, Absorption, Nutrients
Dr Lora Hooper and her research team at UT Southwestern found that the good bacteria that live in the guts of mammals programme the metabolic rhythms. Pixabay

A team of US researchers have found a molecule that helps synchronize the absorption of nutrients in the gut with the rhythms of the Earth’s day-night light cycle — a discovery that has far-ranging implications for obesity in affluent countries and malnutrition in impoverished countries.

Dr Lora Hooper and her research team at UT Southwestern found that the good bacteria that live in the guts of mammals programme the metabolic rhythms that govern the body’s absorption of dietary fat.

The team also found that microbes programme these so-called circadian rhythms by activating a protein named “histone deacetylase 3” (HDAC3), which is made by cells that line the gut.

Those cells act as intermediaries between bacteria that aid in digestion of food and proteins that enable absorption of nutrients.

Molecule, Absorption, Nutrients
A team of US researchers have found a molecule that helps synchronize the absorption of nutrients in the gut with the rhythms of the Earth’s day-night light cycle — a discovery that has far-ranging implications for obesity in affluent countries and malnutrition. Pixabay

The microbiome actually communicates with our metabolic machinery to make fat absorption more efficient.

“But when fat is overabundant, this communication can result in obesity. Whether the same thing is going on in other mammals, including humans, is the subject of future studies,” said lead author Dr Zheng Kuang, a postdoctoral fellow in the Hooper’s laboratory in the study published in the journal Science.

The study, done in mice, revealed that HDAC3 turns on genes involved in the absorption of fat.

They found that HDAC3 interacts with the biological clock machinery within the gut to refine the rhythmic ebb and flow of proteins that enhance absorption of fat.

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This regulation occurs in the daytime in humans, who eat during the day, and at night in mice, which eat at night.

“Our results suggest that the microbiome and the circadian clock have evolved to work together to regulate metabolism,” said Hooper.

Disrupting the interactions between the microbiota and the body’s clock could make us more likely to become obese.

“These disruptions happen frequently in modern life when we take antibiotics, work overnight shifts, or travel internationally. But we think that our findings might eventually lead to new treatments for obesity – and possibly malnutrition – by altering the bacteria in our guts,” the researchers mentioned. (IANS)

Next Story

Find Out the Health Benefits of the Pear Fruit

Here's how the pear fruit can keep you healthy

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Pear fruit
The high-fiber, heart-healthy pear fruit stands out for its taste and nutritional value. Pixabay

If eating healthier and weight loss are priorities in the new year, find out how a pear a day keeps your pounds away and why you should choose this fruit every day in 2020.

The high-fiber, heart-healthy pear stands out for its taste and nutritional value. Here are a few benefits suggested by Pear Bureau Northwest:

Adding this juicy fruit in your day to day diet can make a huge difference, be it managing metabolic syndrome problems, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, even cancers or something as simple as weight management which almost all of us want to take care of.

Pears are rich in antioxidants and fibers, deficiency of which can cause something as minor as constipation or as major as cancer.

Talking of gut health, the dietary fiber found in pears helps the digestive tract run smoothly and keeps us regular. Pears being high in fiber almost acts like a broom moving through our system removing toxins and bad cholesterol from the body.

PEAR FRUIT
Pear fruit is rich in antioxidants. Pixabay

This lovely bell-shaped fruit is also an excellent source of vitamin C. A pear has around 8 mg of vitamin, an antioxidant that lends a hand to cell repair and cell regeneration. The vitamin also gives a powerful boost to our immune system and our skin, teeth, and bones. Have acne? Eat a pear!

If you tend to eat a lot of sodium-heavy processed foods like sauces, you might want to bite into a pear. Incorporating potassium-rich foods like pears help to flush out excess sodium from the body.

Also Read- Plants And Trees Can Curb Pollution More Effectively Than Technology

A medium pear has about 206 mg of the nutrient. Adding more potassium to cut down sodium can also help reduce your risk of high blood pressure.

Convinced enough to indulge in a pear? Go for this juicy fruit. (IANS)