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The fabric shows promise for making reusable, antibacterial/antiviral cloth face masks and protective suits, the researchers noted. Pixabay

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have developed a special type of cotton face mask that kills up to 99.9999 percent of bacteria and viruses within 60 minutes of daylight exposure.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have become accustomed to wearing cotton face masks in public places, according to the study, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, reported,


However, viruses and bacteria that stick to the mask could be transferred elsewhere when the wearer removes or touches it.

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“Face masks made of various cloth materials can filter nanoscale aerosol particles — such as those released by a cough or sneeze — potentially helping to reduce the spread of diseases, including COVID-19,” said the researchers from the University of California, Davis in the US.

But live bacteria and viruses on the surface of the mask could still be contagious.

The research team wanted to develop a new cotton fabric that would release reactive oxygen species (ROS) when exposed to daylight, killing microbes attached to the fabric’s surfaces while being washable, reusable, and safe for the wearer.

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Then, a person could disinfect their cloth mask during their lunch hour outside in the sun, or by spending a longer period of time under office or building lights, which are much less intense than sunlight.


Viruses and bacteria that stick to the mask could be transferred elsewhere when the wearer removes or touches it. Pixabay

The researchers made their antimicrobial fabrics by attaching positively charged chains of 2-diethyl aminoethyl chloride (DEAE-Cl) to ordinary cotton.

Want to read more in Hindi? Checkout: अयोध्या में भव्यता और दिव्यता के साथ इकोफ्रेंडली भी होगा दीपोत्सव

Then, they dyed the modified cotton in a solution of a negatively charged photosensitizer (a compound that releases ROS upon exposure to light), which is attached to the DEAE chains by strong electrostatic interactions.

The team found that a fabric made with a dye called rose Bengal as the photosensitizer killed 99.9999 percent of bacteria added to the fabric within 60 minutes of daylight exposure and inactivated 99.9999 percent of T7 bacteriophage — a virus thought to be more resistant to ROS than some coronaviruses — within 30 minutes.

Further testing showed that the material could be hand-washed at least 10 times and constantly exposed to daylight for at least seven days without losing its antimicrobial activity.

ALSO READ: Domestic Airlines to Deploy Up to 70% of Flight Capacity

The fabric shows promise for making reusable, antibacterial/antiviral cloth face masks and protective suits, the researchers noted. (IANS)


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