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Omentum: ‘Policeman of Abdomen’ is an Important Organ to be studied

The Omentum is the least familiar organ to the scientists as well as to the public.

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Obese man
An Obese man. The omentum is like an apron shaped sheet of fat stretching from the liver. Wikimedia
  • The omentum is a large sheet of fat stretching protecting the stomach, intestines and the liver
  • The research published in the Journal ‘Trends in Immunology’ highlights that the immune organ is actually a nursery for cancer cells
  • Also called the ‘Policeman of Abdomen’, the omentum is central to our body’s immune system

June 06, 2017: 

What is the Omentum?

The omentum is like an apron shaped sheet of fat stretching from the liver, intestines to the stomach. White patches that are known as ‘milky spots’ cover the surface of the omentum. The milky spots gather information from cells, antigens, and bacteria in order to deduce what really is going on. Accordingly, the omentum decides what immune reaction is required by the abdomen. It fights against infections and toxins.

The Good Part:

The omentum is a doctor within your body. It takes reports of the status of your abdomen well-being and acts accordingly. Scientists believe that omentum may have answers on how to stop the rapid growth of aggressive tumors in the human body. The organ is now under scrutiny as most of the things about the omentum are still unknown.

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The Bad Part: 

The omentum sometimes provides tolerance and not immunity to the tumor cells. Thus cancer cells are pushed towards the milky spots and they stick there. Cancer cells sometimes prompt a tolerant response from the omentum. Scientists fear that this fact of the omentum makes it a nursery for the breeding ground of more cancer cells. As the study says, omentum “sometimes makes wrong decisions”.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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Report: Express Grieving Conditions for Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector

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Developing Countries
Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants, but their Condition is not good in Developing Countries. Wikimedia Commons

A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of sanitation workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk.

Sanitation workers everywhere occupy the lowest rung of society and are stigmatized and marginalized because they do the dirty work that other people do not want to do.

The report’s authors – the International Labor Organization, the World Health Organization, the World Bank and Water Aid – say they hope to raise awareness on the plight of sanitation workers and the dehumanizing conditions under which they are forced to work. For example, the report says that many sanitation workers aren’t given the safety training or equipment needed to protect them when handling effluent or fecal sludge.

World Health Organization spokesman Christian Lindmeier says sanitation workers make an important contribution to public health at the risk of their own lives. Poor sanitation, he says, causes more than 430,000 deaths from diarrhea every year and is linked to the spread of other diseases such as cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio.

“Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants.… Waste must be correctly treated before being disposed of or used. However, workers often come into direct contact with human waste, working with no equipment or no protection to remove it by hand which exposes them to a long list of health hazards and diseases,” Lindmeier said.

Developing Countries
A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk. VOA

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector. They labor under abusive conditions, have no rights or social protections and are poorly paid.

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The study calls on countries to rectify these wrongs. It urges governments to enact laws and regulations that improve working conditions for sanitation workers and protect their safety and health. It says sanitation workers must be given the equipment and training necessary for the safe, proper disposal of waste. (VOA)