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Amaal represents the new generation of Indian music.

Music composer Amaal Mallik's recent composition for the song 'Tum Aaogey' from the film 'Bell Bottom' has garnered rave reviews. "Tum Aaogey is one of my most special songs and one of my best works that I have done for film music," said Amaal during a candid conversation with IANS.

Amaal represents the new generation of Indian music. In a short span of seven years, he has delivered hits like 'Sooraj Dooba Hain' (Roy), 'Soch Na Sake' (Airlift), 'Kar Gayi Chul' (Kapoor & Sons) among several others. He happens to be one of the youngest composers to compose music for Amitabh Bachchan for the film 'Badla' and also the youngest to have performed with the Melbourne Orchestra.

Internationally, Amaal recently collaborated with pop sensation Dua Lipa for the Indian version of 'Levitating'. "It was an amazing experience for me to collaborate with Dua Lipa. She loved my work. It was the first of its kind collaboration between Indian and international music artistes and fans around the world were delighted with the new rendition of the song. It was an honour for me to do an official Indian remix and giving an Indian touch to one of her biggest tracks, one of the standout songs on the 'Future Nostalgia' album."

Man with balck shirt and pant sitting Internationally, Amaal recently collaborated with pop sensation Dua Lipa for the Indian version of 'Levitating' | IANS

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Kelkar, became a household name with the TV soap 'Saat Phere' - Wikimedia Commons

Indian television and film actor Sharad Kelkar says that struggles make an actor value their success more, this was the case with him too. Kelkar has come a long way in not just his actingcareer, but as a voice-over artist too, something he achieved after overcoming the challenge of stammering, he says. Kelkar, who became a household name with the TV soap 'Saat Phere', speaks to IANSlife in an exclusive chat:

On his journey in the film industry:
I'd complete ten years in the film industry, although I started my film career in 2004 when I did a Marathi film. But shifting from this to that, happened in 2012 with 'Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela'. It's been a great journey, I've made good friends. The audience has accepted me as an actor. It's a great achievement. Any actor strives to be accepted and appreciated for your value. Credit goes to viewers who like my work, and to luck also. I do believe in luck.

On initial struggles:
Everyone has faced struggles. My initial dayswere full of struggles, not getting work, 'paise nahi hai' (there's no money), staying with more than 12-13 people in a house. All that has been done, but anyone values their success more when they have struggled for it. For me, I think the struggle was very important. The other challenge was stammering, and somehow I managed to work on that. I'm still trying to do my best and learn without limitations. My career as a voice over artist is a tricky one, as I am unable to give it the concentration it deserves; I'm more focused on my acting career. If one is travelling in a plane with a mask on, and you call up your friends, people recognise you with your voice. It's a great feeling when your voice doesn't need a face. I'm not doing too many voice-overs but I'd love to.

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Sonam Kapoor at the L'Oreal Paris Femina Women Awards 2014 . Wikimedia Commons

Intensely intimate. Filled with art. A little bit of London. Plenty of India. Magic finds from Paul Bert Serpette and solid-wood floors. Love, laughter, and life. Sonam Kapoor Ahuja, under the expert eye of Rooshad Shroff has imagined, curated, and choreographed her London home and studio herself. And for the very first time, the Bollywood actor has opened the doors to Architectural Digest for an exclusive peek into her home.

The magazine's September-October Style features Sonam and Anand Ahuja's home, which is replete with distinct Indian touches. The hand-carved wardrobe doors fashioned by artisans in Mumbai, canework from Arunachal Pradesh, curtains adorned with embroidery by the Lucknow studio of Maximiliano Modesti and the dining room walls covered in de Gournay's 'Early Views of India' -- all sing a romantic song of Sonam's love for India.

Sonam kapoor Sonam's vision for this atmospheric pied-a-terre has been brought to life with Mumbai-based architect Rooshad Shroff. Wikimedia Commons

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Is Bhumi comfortable with the 'star tag?. Wikimedia Commons

On her debut in 2015, Bhumi Pednekar took critics by surprise, and won awards, by playing an overweight bride who speaks up for her rights in the romantic comedy 'Dum Laga Ke Haisha'. Since then, Bhumi Pednekar has given a string of hits with meaningful cinema. She has been seen in 'Toilet: Ek Prem Katha', 'Shubh Mangal Savdhaan', 'Saand Ki Aankh', 'Bala', 'Pati Patni Aur Woh' and 'Dolly Kitty Aur Woh Chamakte Sitare', and many more such critically acclaimed films.

But is Bhumi comfortable with the 'star tag? In an interview with IANS, the actress, who started out as an assistant to Shanoo Sharma, the casting director of Yash Raj Films, made the confession: "I am a little shy to call myself a star." She insists she is an actor "who has received a lot of love". Bhumi said: "I think the definition of stardom has changed across different generations. But yes, I am grateful that my films are appreciated and people love me and I am going to continue doing whatever I do on and off screen."

Hindi cinema is known for its bigger-than-life films, but Bhumi has stood her ground on featuring only in 'message-driven' films and calls herself fortunate. "I have always been keen that my films should have a positive message along with entertainment, as that's what cinema is primarily meant to do," Bhumi said. She added: "I feel that's how films in the future would also be. If someone is spending two hours watching a film, or my piece of content, it must lead to some kind of a positive change in their mindset."

Bhumi has a couple of heroine-centric projects lined up over the next few months Bhumi concluded: "I know it's difficult, but I try to make my ecosystem as sustainable as possible." . Wikimedia Commons

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