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Every year on December 4, Indian Navy Day is celebrated, wherein the whole nation remembers one of the most significant operations, Operation Trident.

Every year on December 4, Indian Navy Day is celebrated wherein the whole country remembers one of the most significant operations, Operation Trident.

This year, the nation is all set to celebrate the day as ‘Swarnim Vijay Varsh’, as it shall be commemorating the 50th anniversary of the victory in the Indo-Pak war of 1971.

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Photo by Wikimedia Commons

A statue of the Maratha queen, Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar, who got the Kashi Vishwanath temple reconstructed in 1777, will be installed at Kashi Vishwanath Dham Corridor

A statue of the Maratha queen, Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar, who got the Kashi Vishwanath temple reconstructed in 1777, will be installed at Kashi Vishwanath Dham Corridor that is likely to be inaugurated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on December 13.

The temple complex will also have statues of Aadi Shankaracharya, Bharat Mata and Lord Kartikeya.

According to Divisional Commissioner Deepak Agrawal, "The process for restoration of idols of Goddess Parvati, Goddess Annapurna, Lord Ganesh, Lord Hanuman and Lord Satyanarayan in the KV temple premises has been started by installing prefabricated temples there."

Agrawal further said, "The process of installing statues of Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar, Adi Shankaracharya, Bharat Mata and Lord Kartikeya has also been started. The statue of Adi Shankaracharya will be installed at KV Dham's entry point near the ghat along the Ganga."

The statue of Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar will be installed near the tourist facilitation centre, while Bharat Mata's statue will be mounted near Mandir Chowk. The statue of Lord Kartikeya is being installed near KVT. Each statue is 6.5 ft tall and will be installed on stone pedestals.

Since its construction by Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar in 1977, the Kashi Vishwanath temple, considered among the 12 Jyotirlingas of Lord Shiva, is witnessing massive renovation and development for the first time.

Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath in November 2018 had asked the authorities to ensure that the statue of Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar is installed as a tribute to her for rebuilding KVT in 1777 after it was destroyed in the Mughal period.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had also paid tributes to Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar and paved the way for developing facilities for hassle-free visit of pilgrims to the shrine.

Keywords: India, Kashi Temple, Ahilyabai Holkar, Narendra Modi


Wikimedia Commons

Pheran is an essential component of Kashmiri culture and clothing.

Pheran is an essential component of Kashmiri culture and clothing. It is worn by men and women, as well as children. While some say Mughal emperor Akbar introduced the long garment in Kashmir Valley; others claim it was designed by Persian visitors to shield themselves from the biting cold during winters. Kangri, a Kashmiri firepot, can be kept under a pheran. It represents the historical continuity of Kashmiri culture since no significant alterations have been made to the garment.

Kashmiri man with his grand son in pheran Recently, pheran have made a resurgence as part of current fashion and are worn by women from all across India. | Wikimedia Commons

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Unsplash

In Hinduism women cover their head and face with the part of their garment

Covering their head and face is an integral part of the Indian traditional dress code. Pardah or purdah pratha is a religious and social practice where women are secluded from the communities both within Hinduism and Islam. Researchers say that this started to protect women from aggressors' eyes. The roots of the Purdah system can be traced in the Persian culture which was later adopted by Muslims in the 7th century AD. When the Mughals invaded India they brought the Purdah system to India with them in the 19th century, and it was later adopted by the Hindu community in India.

In literal terms, Purdah translates to the curtain which physically segregates women from men, and as a physical expression, it is adopted as burqa (a veil made out of garment to cover women's all body parts including hair and face) and ghoonghat (in Hinduism women cover their head and face with the part of their garment). Hinduism views the practice as the means to safeguard women from other men whereas Islam created the practice to enforce supremacy over women. Customs like these have existed in India's patriarchal society proving the systematic lens to view women as weaker gender in the public and private spheres.

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