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VOA

Surgeons attached a pig kidney to a pair of large blood vessels outside the body of a deceased recipient so they could observe it for two days, and the kidney did what it was supposed to do.

Scientists temporarily attached a pig's kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for lifesaving transplants.

Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but among the hurdles: A sugar in pig cells, foreign to the human body, causes immediate organ rejection. The kidney for this experiment came from a gene-edited animal, engineered to eliminate that sugar and avoid an immune system attack.

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We have the faculties of action, freewill, and the power of knowledge.

By- Devakinanda Ji

OṀ (AUM)-JII-VI-ṪAAR-DHA-BO'-DHA-KA- BHOO-MYAI-Ṇ—NA-MA-HA

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Are we just focused on post-heart attack action? Or should we be focused more on prevention?

Many young and middle-aged people today are dying of sudden heart attacks. Studies show that cardiovascular diseases (CVD) strike Indians a decade earlier compared to their Western counterparts. Why is this happening? How can we prevent it? Are we just focused on post-heart attack action? Or should we be focused more on prevention?

Luke Coutinho, Holistic Lifestyle Coach -- Integrative and Lifestyle Medicine shares an input that could prevent heart attacks at a young age:

Cholesterol is not the culprit, inflammation is: Many people believe that high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides are the sole culprits behind their heart attacks. The main reasons behind most heart attacks are inflammation and oxidative damage in the heart, blood vessels, endothelial lining, arteries, and more. While maintaining healthy cholesterol levels is important, we cannot blame heart attacks on cholesterol levels alone. What then can you do to keep inflammation in check and your heart strong? Adopt simple lifestyle changes.

cholestrol-control-tips Many people believe that high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides are the sole culprits behind their heart attacks. | Flickr

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Photo by Unsplash

For the study, the team looked for resistance to colistin in bacteria in faecal samples from people and pets.

The dangerous MCR-1 gene, which provides resistance to the last-resort antibiotic colistin, has been found in four healthy humans and two pet dogs, according to new research, which found that the gene can be transmitted between dogs and their owners.

The study raises concerns that pets can act as reservoirs of the gene and so aid the spread of resistance to precious last-line antibiotics, said researchers from the University of Lisbon.

They found two cases, in which both dog and owner were harbouring the gene.

The MCR-1 gene, first reported in China in 2015, confers resistance to colistin -- an antibiotic of last resort used to treat infections from some bacteria resistant to all other antibiotics. If MCR-1 combines with already drug-resistant bacteria, it can create a truly untreatable infection, the researchers said.

"Colistin is used when all other antibiotics have failed -- it is a crucial treatment of last resort. If bacteria resistant to all drugs acquire this resistance gene, they would become untreatable, and that's a scenario we must avoid at all costs," said Juliana Menezes from the varsity's Centre of Interdisciplinary Research in Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.

"We know that the overuse of antibiotics drives resistance and it is vital that they are used responsibly, not just in medicine but also in veterinary medicine and farming," Menezes added.

For the study, the team looked for resistance to colistin in bacteria in faecal samples from people and pets.

Dogs They found two cases, in which both dog and owner were harbouring the gene Photo by Unsplash

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