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This practice was carried out since the time of kings, briefly stopped during the British rule, and was reintroduced by the Wodeyars of Mysore. Image credit: wikimedia commons

On the ninth day of the Navratri celebrations, Ayudha Pooja is celebrated in Karnataka, where all the instruments of the household or shop are gathered together in one place and consecrated before the patron deity. This practice was carried out since the time of kings, briefly stopped during the British rule, and was reintroduced by the Wodeyars of Mysore.

The practice of anointing instruments is believed to have originated during the Kurukshethra war, when Arjuna placed his weapons in the Shami tree before using them in the war. He won the war after doing this, and so people do the same to their household objects believing that it holds great significance to their prosperity and success.

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Golden Chariot is a luxury train that runs in most parts of South India, as part of Karnataka Tourism. Originally dubbed 'Palace on Wheels', this venture began when an MoU was signed between the state tourism department and the Indian Railways.

This luxury train service began officially, in 2008. It took 900 layouts to design, and 200 carpenters working on the cabins. It currently has 44 cabins in 11 coaches, which are themed after the 11 dynasties of Karnataka, namely Hoysala, Kadamba, Rashtrakuta, Ganga, Chalukya, Bahamani, Adil Shahi, Sangama, Satavahana, Yadukula, and Vijayanagara.

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While superstition and many other such beliefs emerged in the heyday of developmental changes in Bangalore, the evolution of such a gruesome urban legend is rather strange.

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A female presence was perceived in some parts of the city, perhaps real, perhaps imaginary, who roamed in search of her lost husband. She would come outside residences and call out. By the time the resident came out, she would either disappear or they would. It was believed that a large number of missing people had been lured into the clutches of this woman.

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