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India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi gestures as he addresses a gathering in New Delhi, India. VOA

India said on Monday its first domestically built nuclear-powered submarine had recently completed a “deterrence patrol,” giving it the capability to fire nuclear weapons from land, air and sea in the event of any “misadventure” by enemies.

With nuclear-armed China to its north and nuclear-armed Pakistan to its west – both of which India has fought wars with – India’s nationalist prime minister, Narendra Modi, said the INS Arihant was a “fitting response to those who indulge in nuclear blackmail.”

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un , VOA

Pyongyang, October 3, 2017 : North Korea on Tuesday threatened Japan with nuclear destruction in response to Tokyo’s attempts to convince the international community to reject dialogue in favor of applying more pressure on Pyongyang.

In an article released by Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), Pyongyang responded to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s speech at the UN General Assembly last month, in which he called for “pressure, not dialogue” to force North Korea to abandon its nuclear ambitions.

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Bomb shelter manufacturer engineers Vincent Carubia, left, and Eward Klein study specifications for a fiber glass dome shelter being installed on an estate in Locust Valley, N.Y. VOA
  • He wondered how much good ducking under a desk could do if a bomb powerful enough to destroy a city fell nearby
  • Then there were backyard bomb shelters, which briefly became the rage during the missile crisis of 1962

After the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, the era of nuclear bomb nightmares -of the atomic arms race, of backyard bomb shelters, of schoolchildren diving under desks to practice their survival skills in the event of an attack -seemed to finally, thankfully, fade into history. Until now.

For some baby boomers, North Korea’s nuclear advances and President Donald Trump’s bellicose response have prompted flashbacks to a time when they were young, and when they prayed each night that they might awaken the next morning. For their children, the North Korean crisis was a taste of what the Cold War was like.

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I was in Mumbai on November 26, 2008 when this great city was attacked by 10 Pakistani Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorists for three days, killing 166 people and leaving hundreds injured. I was also a witness to the huge protest rally that took place three days later outside the Taj Hotel. In my own estimate, over 20,000 people from all walks of life converged there to vent their anger, particularly on Indian politicians and Pakistan.

Never in my whole life I had seen or experienced such anger and rage. I, a 22-year-old young man then, screamed so much that for the next three days I could not speak.

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