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The UK listed the Tamil rebel group which fought for a separate territory from the Northern and Eastern Sri Lanka, as a terrorist outfit in early 2000.

Sri Lanka has commended the UK's move to maintain the proscription of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) as a terrorist organisation. In a statement on Thursday, the Foreign Ministry in Colombo said that that the government has been made aware that the UK Home Secretary has decided to maintain the proscription of the LTTE under the UK Terrorism Act No. 7 of 2000 following the judgement of the Proscribed Organizations Appeals Commission (POAC).


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At least 56 civilians have been killed in Afghanistan in the last week alone, according to the World Health Organization.

Islamist insurgents now claim to control 85 per cent of Afghanistan as the US-led mission draws to a close and Britain's military chief describes the situation as "pretty grim", Sky News reported.

Taliban militants are continuing to make rapid military advances across Afghanistan as western forces withdraw after two decades of conflict.

The report said that the Islamist insurgents now claim to control 85 per cent of the country, having overrun areas bordering five countries -- Iran, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, China and Pakistan -- prompting Afghan security personnel to flee.

At least 56 civilians have been killed in Afghanistan in the last week alone, according to the World Health Organization.

The head of the UK armed forces, General Nick Carter, has described the situation as "pretty grim", as Prime Minister Boris Johnson signalled the end of Britain's military mission in the country.

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Most of the findings are isolated footprints, but one discovery comprises six footprints.

A team of researchers in the UK has discovered footprints from at least six different species of dinosaurs -- the very last dinosaurs to walk on the UK soil 110 million years ago.

The discovery of dinosaur footprints by a curator from Hastings Museum and Art Gallery and a scientist from the University of Portsmouth is the last record of dinosaurs in Britain.

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The footprints were discovered in the cliffs and on the foreshore in Folkestone, Kent, where stormy conditions affect the cliff and coastal waters and are constantly revealing new fossils.

"This is the first time dinosaur footprints have been found in strata known as the 'Folkestone Formation' and it's quite an extraordinary discovery because these dinosaurs would have been the last to roam in this country before becoming extinct," said Professor of Palaeobiology, David Martill.

"They were walking around close to where the White Cliffs of Dover are now - next time you're on a ferry and you see those magnificent cliffs just imagine that!"

The footprints are from a variety of dinosaurs, which shows there was a relatively high diversity of dinosaurs in southern England at the end of the Early Cretaceous period, 110 million years ago.

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Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England, is one of the most famous landmarks in the United Kingdom. Pixabay

Featuring 400 artifacts and the breakthrough science behind some of the latest discoveries about England’s prehistoric monument of Stonehenge, which is also a World Heritage Site, an exhibition has opened on Friday at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

Described as inspiring, magical and sacred, Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England, is one of the most famous landmarks in the United Kingdom. The monument once consisted of rings and horseshoes of standing stones, some topped by horizontal “lintels”. The largest stones are around 23 feet high, nine feet wide, and weigh over 50,000 pounds. Scientific analysis has revealed that some of the stones were transported an incredible distance from the Preseli Mountains in Wales, over 150 miles away, with no modern means of transportation.

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