Friday February 23, 2018

Know the Truth behind Mental Blocks in the Human Body

A mental block affects one’s ability to perform a mental action, creativity, skill, career or life

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Mental Blocks in the Human Body
A human being is always thinking about multiple things which leads to complexity of thoughts. Pixabay
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July 10, 2017: 

– by Surbhi Dhawan

Tension has surrounded us as the inevitable guest of our lives. Everyone is stressed today, be it a student or a well-settled man. These pressures highly affect our lives in a negative way and then efforts are made to withdraw these tensions out of our lives. These efforts are very fair on their part because who doesn’t want to stay happy? Who does not want to be ahead? Who wants to be left out, when the whole world is moving forward? The solution is not the perception of this world as enchantment and illusion. The solution lies in clearing the mental blocks in the atmosphere.

A mental block affects one’s ability to perform a mental action, creativity, skill, career or life. It is an unmanageable suppression of painful, unwanted thoughts or memories. An emotional turmoil is the cause of the majority of mental blocks. There is a possibility that a wrong choice might make a student realize that it was not his cup of tea and cause mental blocks. Performance concern might make an athlete lose focus. These mental blocks are a mixture of the memory of incidents and emotions related to that incidents and it is essential to remove both of them.

We can’t keep on accumulating these mental blocks; there is a need to liberate them. There are many ways through which you can release these mental blocks. The first step in tackling these blocks is acceptance. Dr Shaji Prabhakaran, a senior consultant neurologist says “Understand that it can happen to anyone around you. Take a break, relax, find other interests and pursue them. Instead fact, activities like yoga can be of great help. If nothing is effective, do not give up. Seek professional help.”

It’s not necessary for a mental block to be sudden. Dr C.J. John, chief psychiatrist of Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi feels that some events might trigger suppressed memories and unconsciously block emotions. This can range from witnessing a death to a traumatic sexual abuse. There is no definite reason to why the mind acts this way and obsessing about it doesn’t actually help much.

Dr John further helps to give solution by saying that there is a need to address the aspect that bothers you and engage in confidence-building activities, in place of getting tormented. He gives the ideal advice of focusing on life above materialism, he also suggests people to be contented in their life and choose peace over worries. There is a need to start afresh in life which involves letting go your past. If you are not happy with your present job, change your job, if you are not happy with the present situation; change your plan of action. Indulge yourself in a new lifestyle and know your priorities and make a suitable schedule for yourself.

Relaxation is also one way by which you can get detoxed. Psychotherapy can also help us to declutter these mental blocks. It includes treating mental disorder through psychological means, by working on emotional and mental state of a person.  Despite them, meditation is the most important and effective in clearing mental blocks. It’s the most successful method in getting rid of the mental blocks. It helps to flushes out the emotions and also the memory related to that emotion. You can get completely get relieved of these mental blocks after practicing meditation regularly.

For everyone around, who is living a busy life, a target-oriented life, escaping mental blocks is nearly impossible. There is a need to cultivate the capacity to deal well with the fast pace. It just needs a simple similar effort on your part as needed in clearing a cluttered room. Reorder the things in your life and break the mental wall that blocks your way. 

– by Surbhi Dhawan. twitter @surbhi_dhawan

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Copyright 2017 NewsGram

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Heart Attack Symptoms In Women Often Misinterpreted

The research paper, published in the journal Circulation, examined the relationship between gender, symptoms, perception of symptoms, and care-seeking among patients

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heart attack
Women were also more likely to perceive their symptoms as stress or anxiety, and were more likely than men to report that their healthcare providers did not think that their symptoms were heart-related. Pexels

Young women who report heart attack symptoms such as indigestion, shortness of breath, palpitations or pain in the jaw, neck, or arms, were more likely than men to have them dismissed by their doctors as not heart related, raising their risk of death than similarly aged men, finds a new study.

Previous studies have reported that women were less likely to present with chest pain for acute myocardial infarction — commonly known as a heart attack — but more likely to report a wider variety of symptoms and also more likely to die in a hospital from the disease.

“When young women with multiple risk factors visit their doctor with any chest discomfort or other symptoms that may be associated with ischemic heart disease”, doctors should treat them appropriately, said Gail D’Onofrio from the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH).

ALSO READ: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

The research paper, published in the journal Circulation, examined the relationship between gender, symptoms, perception of symptoms, and care-seeking among patients (2,009 women and 976 men) who were 55 years and younger and were hospitalized for heart attack.

heart attack
The analysis showed that the majority of both men and women reported chest pain, pressure, tightness, or discomfort as their main heart attack symptoms. Pexels

 

Yet, women were more likely than men to report other associated symptoms of heart attack, such as indigestion, shortness of breath, palpitations or pain in the jaw, neck, or arms.

ALSO READ: Memory of a heart attack gets stored in genes through epigenetic changes

Women were also more likely to perceive their symptoms as stress or anxiety, and were more likely than men to report that their healthcare providers did not think that their symptoms were heart-related, the researchers said.

“Although chest pain was the most common symptom for young women and men, the presentation of chest pain within the context of multiple symptoms may influence the prompt recognition of heart disease for these young patients,” said Judith H. Lichtman, associate professor at the YSPH. (IANS)

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