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10 acres alloted for establishment of Sanskrit College in Mata Mansa Devi complex

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Chandigarh: The Mata Mansa Devi Shrine Board (MMDSB) has finally accepted to establish a Post Graduate Sanskrit College after four repeated reminders from the Higher Education department. The college will be set up in the vicinity of the temple under a reserved area of 10 acres.

As proposed, the institution which is to be named after Mata Mansa Devi Mandir will provide undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Sanskrit for students. It will be built in the Mansa Devi complex near Shri Laxmi Bhawan Dharamshala. Yoga classes are also suggested to be conducted.

V G Goel, the CEO of MMDSB, believes the institution would prove to be of great significance for Indian culture, heritage and dissemination of Sanskrit. He said: “It will be an institution of higher learning for those who want to learn Sanskrit, and will prepare pandits and pujaris of not only national but international importance. Sanskrit is a language of immense significance globally.”

The Shrine Board would bear the cost of construction and annual expenditure, as per the proposal. However, the recurring expenditure on payment of faculties will be borne by the government. A total of 105 acres in the Mansa Devi Complex is owned by the Board. It further receives a cash donation of about Rs 15 crore per annum.

The institution will follow the guidelines issued by the Education Department, Haryana, and University Grants Commission (UGC).

In the meantime, the Board has also proposed that classes could be started from Shri Laxmi Bhawan Dharamshala, which has 45 rooms and six halls. The proposal is yet to be approved by the department.

The proposal to set up the university was suggested by the BJP led government in October 2014 after it came into power in Haryana.

The Education Minister Ram Bilas Sharma made the announcement initially when he visited the shrine early in 2015; however, the principle approval was given by Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar in his meeting with the shrine board in November 2015.

Khattar announced about the Sanskrit university’s setup with the intention to spread the use of the language by providing proper teaching and training to students.

The Department of Higher Education, Haryana, will now analyze the proposal on different scales of finances, curriculum, strength of students, following which it will be suggested for final approval by the government. (Inputs from

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS