Saturday October 21, 2017
Home India 10 filmmakers...

10 filmmakers return national awards over growing intolerance

1
91

Mumbai/Pune: In a dramatic development, 10 prominent filmmakers returned various awards and honours to the government, protesting impediments to freedom of speech and expression and showing solidarity with the FTII students, here on Wednesday.

The filmmakers are Anand Patwardhan, Dipankar Banerjee, Paresh Kamdar, Nishtha Jain, Kirti Nakhwa, Harshavardhan Kulkarni, Hari Nair, Rakesh Sharma, Indraneel Lahiri and Lipika Singh Darai.

“As filmmakers, we stand firmly with the students of FTII and are determined to not let them shoulder the entire burden of their protests. They have mounted a historic struggle and we urge others within our fraternity to come forward and carry this protest forward,” a memorandum signed by the filmmakers said.

The development came hours after three prominent alumni of the Film & Television Institute of India (FTII), Pune, announced they would return their national awards to protest against what they termed “an atmosphere of intolerance” in the country in last few months.

They are Vikrant Pawar of Maharashtra, Rakesh Shukla of Uttar Pradesh and Prateek Vats of Goa.

Pawar had bagged the President’s Gold Medal for his film, ‘Kaatal’ in the Best Short Fiction category in 2012.

Shukla won the Special Mention Award at the National Students Film Festival in 2013 for his film ‘Donkey Fair’.

Vats bagged the Rajat Kamal Award for Best Short Fiction for his film, ‘Kal, 15 August, Dukan Band Rahegi’ in 2010.

The decision by the filmmakers came shortly after the FTII students announced an end to their 139-day long strike, but resolved to continue their agitation peacefully to protest against the appointment of Gajendra Chauhan as FTII chairman.

Pawar said now the issue has “gone beyond FTII” and is affecting the entire education system of the country, right from the primary school levels, which is being changed without taking into account aspects which concern the society at large.

Pawar, Shukla and Vats join the long list of various scholars, intellectuals, writers, artists and others who have returned various national awards and honours across the country in the past few days.

(IANS)

1 COMMENT

  1. Returning such hard earned awards is not the solution to the problem. There can be other methods too. As all of these are prominent figures in the film industry, they can work together, take steps together for whatever they wish the government should do.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Next Story

Welcome the new Chairman of the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII), Anupam Kher

Actor Kabir Bedi said Anupam “would do wonders” in his new role

0
28
ftii
Veteran actor Anupam Kher. Wikimedia

Pune, October 11, 2017 : Anupam Kher, an actor with a repertoire of over 500 movies including international projects, was named Chairman of the prestigious Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) in Pune. The film industry hailed the move.

Official sources confirmed Anupam’s appointment. He will succeed the controversial Gajendra Chauhan, whose appointment had triggered student protests.

Anupam’s wife Kirron Kher, an actress and BJP MP from Chandigarh, told Times NOW: “I’m very happy. Of course, it’s a challenging job for anybody. It’s not going to be an easy job. These chairmanships are crown of thorns. Here, people do get against you, but I am sure Anupam will be able to take them along because he is an extremely talented person.”

Anupam, who began his acting career with “Saaransh” in 1984, also has his own acting institute Actor Prepares.

Kirron said Anupam was the right choice to head the FTII, which provides training in acting, direction and other technical aspects of film making in a country which is one of the largest producers of movies.

ALSO READ Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) in Pune to Screen Films Made by its Alumni from August 5

“My husband is a very fine actor. He has been in the film industry for so many years. He is very capable of (being FTII head).

“He has been teaching acting for so long. He is the only person who earlier headed CBFC, then National School of Drama and now has been appointed Chairman of FTII.

“So, I am a very proud wife today. I would like to thank the government and the Information and Broadcasting Ministry,” she said.

Asked what she meant by ‘crown of thorns’, she said: “I meant the CBFC, not FTII.”

Filmmaker Madhur Bhandarkar tweeted: “Heartiest congratulations to Anupam Kher for being appointed as the Chairman of FTII.”

Filmmaker Pritish Nandy called it an “excellent change” at FTII. “Finally, the government is listening to us.”

Actor Kabir Bedi said Anupam “would do wonders” in his new role. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s the list of all the important awards you need to know at one place

Here we have compiled a list of all important awards, saving you a part of your time that you would have wasted sweeping through webpages to know about one of these

0
42
List of all the important awards
List of Awards. Pixabay

New Delhi, August 14, 2017: Be it for Competitive Exams, or simply General Knowledge, it’s always good to let your brain know things that matter. Awards, indeed are recognition given to people for their achievements, accomplishments, or contributions in a particular field, therefore it becomes important to know which award holds what purpose, when was it instituted, and when is it given. Here we have compiled a list of all important awards, saving you a part of your time that you would have otherwise wasted sweeping through webpages, searching for the awards one by one.

A must read articleEight Kannada authors who have won ‘Jnanpith Award’

LIST OF ALL IMPORTANT AWARDS

1. Nobel Prize: The most coveted international award was named after Alfred Bernard Nobel, the inventor of dynamite. The award is given every year on December 10th, which marks the death anniversary of Alfred Bernard Nobel. The Nobel Prize is given to those renowned persons who have made pioneering achievements in the fields of Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Peace, Literature, and Economics. Awards for all categories have been given since 1901, except Economics which was instituted in 1967 and first given in 1969.

2. Magsaysay Awards: Named after the former president of Philippines, Ramon Magasaysay, this award was Instituted in 1957. The award is presented every year on August 31, for excellent contributions in journalism, literature, arts, international understanding, community leadership and public service. It is also regarded as the Nobel prize of Asia.

3. Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding: The Government of India Instituted this award in in 1965 to honor the work of persons for outstanding contributions to goodwill and international understanding among people around the world.

4. Oscar Awards: The most prestigious award in the world of cinema was instituted in 1929. The Academy of Motion Pictures in USA confers the award annually. Bhanu Athaiya was the first Indian to get an Oscar for his movie ‘Gandhi’, while Satyajit Ray, the first Indian to be awarded with an Oscar for lifetime achievements in Cinema in 1992.

LIST OF ALL IMPORTANT AWARDS

5. UNESCO Peace Prize: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) presents this award for remarkable contributions for international peace.

6. Pulitzer Prize: Instituted in 1997, this award is conferred annually in the USA, for extraordinary accomplishments in journalism, music and literature. The award is named after the US publisher, Joseph Pulitzer.

7. Right Livelihood Award: Instituted in 1980 by the Right Livelihood Society, London, also known as alternate Nobel Award, is given to persons for contributing in the areas of environment and social justice.

8. Mahatma Gandhi Peace Prize: Instituted in 1995 by Government of India, following the lines of Nobel prize, It is presented for contributions in maintaining or promoting international peace.

9. UNESCO Human Rights Award: Another award presented by UNESCO every alternate year, for work in the field of Human Rights and its awareness.

LIST OF ALL IMPORTANT AWARDS

10. Man Booker Prize: Man Booker makes for the highest literary honor to authors of British, Irish and Commonwealth countries. It was instituted in 1968 by the Booker Company and the British Publishers Association following the lines of Pulitzer Prize of US.

11. UN Human Rights Award: This award is presented every sixth year by UN for personal contribution for the cause of human rights.

12. World Food Prize: The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) presents the award for contributions in the field of agriculture and food development.

Also read: Southern Film Industry bags 18 National Film Awards. 

13. Indira Gandhi Award For International Peace, Disarmament and Development: This award is presented by Indira Gandhi Memorial Fund in India for specialized contribution in the field of international disarmament and development.

14. Bharat Ratna: Bharat Ratna or the highest civilian award of India is presented by the Government of India for rarest achievements in the field of art, literature and science, and extraordinary public service. It was instituted in 1954, with C. Rajagopalchari as its first recipient.

15. Padma Vibhushan: The second highest civilian award, coming right after Padma Vibhushan is presented for distinguished services in any field including Government service. The other important civilian awards include, Padma Bhushan and Padma Shree.

LIST OF ALL IMPORTANT AWARDS

16. Bhartiya Jnanpeeth Awards: Instituted in 1965, these awards are given to scholars for their distinguished works in any of the recognized languages.

17. Sahitya Akademy Awards: Instituted in 1955, these awards are presented to writers for any exclusive writing in any of the 22 languages including English literature.

18. Saraswati Samman: Instituted in 1991 by the K.K. Birla Foundation, the honor is given for any distinguished literary work made during last 10 years in any of the Indian language.

19. Vyas Samman: Instituted in 1992 by the K.K. Birla Foundation, the honor is given to people for outstanding contribution to Hindi literature.

20.  Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Awards: They are presented to the Indian scientists for their exceptionally brilliant performance.

LIST OF ALL IMPORTANT AWARDS

21. R.D. Birla Award: This award is given in the field of medical sciences.

22. Dhanvantri Award: These awards are given for exceptional performance in medical sciences.

23. Arjuna Awards: The prestigious Arjuna awards, instituted in 1961, are presented by the Youth affairs and Sports Ministry, Government of India, for achievements of players in National Sports.

24. Dronacharya Awards: Instituted in 1985, the award is given by the Sports Ministry, government of India, for excellent coaching in sports and games. It is named after Drona, also known as guru Dronacharya, a character from the Sanskrit epic Mahabharata.

Also read: Nari Shakti Awards on the Occasion of International Women’s Day

25. Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna: It is the highest sporting honor of India, awarded for excellent performance in sports and games. The award is named after Rajiv Gandhi, former prime minister of India. It was instituted in 1992.

26. Gallantry Awards
* Param Vir Chakra: It is the highest award for bravery in India, awarded for displaying valor during wartime.
* Mahavir Chakra: It is the second highest gallantry award after Param Vir Chakra, awarded for acts of gallantry in the presence of the enemy.
* Vir Chakra: It is the third highest gallantry award, presented for exhibiting bravery in the battlefield.
* Ashok Chakra: It is the highest peace-time gallantry award, presented for courageous action away from the battlefield.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_Samiksha

Next Story

Movies at Toronto International Film Festival will increase audience’s excitement, raise debates on burning issues

Many of the films at Toronto International Film Festival will talk about relevant topics like equality in Hollywood, politics in Washington

0
33
Sally Hawkins, left, and Octavia Spencer in a scene from
Sally Hawkins, left, and Octavia Spencer in a scene from "The Shape of Water." The movie premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival. VOA
  • “The Battle of the sexes” starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell talks about issue of gender equality- in both pay disparity and directing opportunity
  • It’s a great thing for the filmmakers to have what is usually a pretty film-oriented, film-loving audience
  • The filmmakers say they are expecting a variety of opinions in any one audience at Toronto International Film Festival

New York, USA, September 7, 2017: Few institutions in cinema can match the teeming, overwhelming Toronto International Film Festival as a conversation-starting force. It simply has a lot of movies worth talking about.

And this year, many of the films that will parade down at Toronto International Film Festival’s red carpets will hope to shift the dialogue not just in terms of awards buzz, but in other directions, too: equality in Hollywood; politics in Washington; even about nature of the movies, themselves. At TIFF, expect debate.

That’s what the filmmakers behind “The Battle of the Sexes,” one of the anticipated films heading to Toronto International Film Festival in the coming days, are hoping for. After the festival opens today with another tennis movie, the rivalry drama “Borg/McEnroe,” at Toronto International Film Festival with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (the directing duo who helmed 2006’s “Little Miss Sunshine”) will premiere their drama about the 1973 showdown between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs.

The movie, starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell, holds obvious parallels for a movie industry with its own issues of gender equality, in both pay disparity and directing opportunity. For others, it will recall issues that dominated last year’s U.S. presidential campaign. But “Battle of the Sexes” may surprise moviegoers in its broad sympathies on both sides of the net.

“The one thing we didn’t want to have happened was this polarizing political document,” said Dayton. “Right now, there’s enough of that in the world. We wanted to tell a more personal story and keep it from becoming too binary.”

The filmmakers say they are expecting “a variety of opinions in any one audience” at Toronto International Film Festival.

“It’s really the best way to release a film, at a festival like Telluride or Toronto,” said Faris. “It’s a great way to get the word out about a film. It’s a great thing for the filmmakers to have what is usually a pretty film-oriented, film-loving audience. It gives you hope that they’re still out there.”

Actress Priyanka Chopra, left, chats with the director and CEO of TIFF Piers Handling at the TIFF Soiree, an annual fundraiser and celebratory kick-off for the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival, at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, Sept. 6, 2017, in Toronto
Actress Priyanka Chopra, left, chats with the director and CEO of TIFF Piers Handling at the TIFF Soiree, an annual fundraiser and celebratory kick-off for the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival, at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, Sept. 6, 2017, in Toronto. VOA

The Toronto International Film Festival comes right on the heels of the Venice and Telluride festivals, but the size and scope of Toronto have long made it the centerpiece of the fall movie season. It’s where much of the coming awards season gets handicapped, debated and solidified. It’s also a significant market for new films, and this year several intriguing films — “I, Tonya,” with Margot Robbie as Tonya Harding, and “Hostiles,” a brutal Western with Christian Bale — are on the block.

But most eyes will be on the gala premieres of the fall’s biggest films at Toronto International Film Festival, including Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing,” Guillermo Del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” George Clooney’s “Suburbicon,” and maybe the most explosive movie of the season, Darren Aronofsky’s mystery-shrouded allegorical thriller “mother!”

It can be a competitive landscape, with dozens of daily movie premieres and their respective parties, all trying to stand out. But several first-time directors may end up stealing the spotlight at Toronto International Film Festival. Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird” will sail into Toronto on waves of rave reviews from Telluride. Aaron Sorkin, arguably the top screenwriter in Hollywood for two decades, will present his directorial debut, “Molly’s Game.”

Sorkin didn’t initially anticipate he’d direct his script. But he became, he says, obsessed with the story of Molly Bloom (Jessica Chastain), the former elite skier who was indicted for running a high-stakes poker game in Los Angeles. It’s a potentially career-redefining movie for Sorkin — and he’s appropriately anxious.

“I’d feel the same way if we were launching it in Wyoming. I’m nervous because other than test audiences, this will be the first time people see it,” said Sorkin. “The Toronto Film Festival is a very prestigious place to debut a film, so I’m aware of the company I’m in and what’s expected in the movie. It will be up to others to decide if it delivered.”

“The Disaster Artist” poses a similar turning point for its star and director, James Franco. It’s about the making of what’s widely considered one of the worst movies ever made — the cult favorite “The Room,” by Tommy Wiseau. Franco, who plays Wiseau, considers it a new step for him as a filmmaker and says the film’s parody is laced with affection.

“The characters are outsiders. They are weirdos,” said Franco. “But everybody can relate to having a dream and trying to break into this incredibly hard business.”

The film will premiere to a surely raucous audience at a midnight screening. Franco, who first saw “The Room” with an especially excitable Vancouver audience, expects it to be the perfect debut for his film: “Canadians know how to do ‘The Room.”’

“The Disaster Artist,” which A24 will release in December, might give TIFF what “La La Land” did last year — a happily escapist movie about Hollywood. Other films will tackle less comic real-life tales, including Angelina Jolie’s searing Cambodia drama “First They Killed My Father,” the Winston Churchill biopic “Darkest Hour,” with Gary Oldman; and the documentary “The Final Year,” about the last year of Barack Obama’s administration.

Cameron Bailey, artistic director of the festival, said Trump’s presidency “was not a factor in the films we selected,” though he expects it to color the reception of many.

“Some of them will be received with the current political climate in mind,” said Bailey. “One of the things I think you learn from films like (the Watergate drama) ‘Mark Felt’ and (the Ted Kennedy drama) ‘Chappaquiddick’ and others that we have here is that the process of politics is not a pretty one. It involves a lot of conflicted motives, shall we say.”

And who better to make sense of the current political landscape than Armando Iannucci (“Veep,” “The Thick of It”), the master of rapid-fire political farce. In his second feature film, “The Death of Stalin,” he travels back to 1950s Russia only to find an expectedly timely tale of the madcap machinations of political power.

“It is bizarre, isn’t it? When I started showing it to people in January and February earlier this year, people said it resonated with Trump and Putin and fake news,” said Iannucci. “It is about autocracy. It is about what happens when democracy falls apart and one person decides everything. I’m kind of glad it does resonate now. But am I pleased?” (VOA)