22 percent Indian TV programmes found depicting Tobacco are affecting Children

anti-tobacco messages are effective in countering the imagery of tobacco and prompting decision to quit

0
23
A person smoking cigarette, Pixabay

New Delhi, Feb 10, 2017: Twenty-two per cent of the Indian television programmes have been found depicting tobacco and broadcasting them despite 71 per cent viewers being children and adolescents, a report revealed on Friday.

The report titled ‘Evaluation of Tobacco Free Film and Television Policy in India’ conducted by Vital Strategies and supported by World Health Organization (WHO) noted that the implementation of the rule under the Cigarettes and other Tobacco Products Act was very low.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

The report added that anti-tobacco messages are effective in countering the imagery of tobacco and prompting decision to quit. It also called for better implementation of the act.

The film rule was legislated on October 2, 2012, and mandates that three forms of warning messages (anti-tobacco health spots, audio-visual disclaimers and static health warning messages) are broadcast when tobacco products, branding or use are shown in films and television programmes.

The study was conducted under the guidance of the Union Health Ministry. “An effective way of tobacco control would be to ingrain and indoctrinate the young minds, the children and the youths. If they could be weaned away from tobacco use, we believe that the battle is half won,” said Health Secretary C.K Mishra.

Present on the occasion, Nandita Murukutia, Country Director Vital Strategies, said: “The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars to mislead consumers by depicting tobacco use as glamorous or popular.”

According to Murukutia, when tobacco is depicted in films and TV Programmes, it’s doing the tobacco industry’s work for them. “Tobacco kills one million Indians every year and costs our economy $22.4 billion.

The objective of this study is to understand the importance of ‘film rule’ and the current gap in implementation,” said Murukutia. Murukutia urged the TV and film industry to recognise its responsibilities and work towards a tobacco-free culture. (IANS)