Monday May 28, 2018

AAPI’s Global Healthcare Summit 2016 will focus on women’s health issues

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Women

By Shilpika Srivastava

The World Health Organization’s 2000 World Health Report ranks India’s healthcare system at 112 out of 190 countries, which presents a sad picture of India. When compared to the United States of America, which spends 18% of its national GDP towards healthcare services, India spends a meager 4.2%. The problem is exacerbated by the huge gaps between the rural and urban populations.

Furthermore, sanitation facilities are only available to a small population of India, which greatly impact the women inhabitants, especially in rural areas.

With a mission to facilitate excellence in patient care, American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (AAPI) is working towards creating means for better health facilities in India.

Anwar Feroz Siddiqi, Honorary Advisor for AAPI, told NewsGram how women’s health is significant for the future generations. He said that women, being someone’s daughter, wife, mother, take care of every member of the family, and helps in their individual development. However, in that entire scenario, she is the one who greatly neglects and sacrifices her health leading to tons of health issues. “Keep a woman healthy for a happy and healthy family,” he added.

Commenting on where AAPI’s 10th Global Healthcare Summit 2016 to be held in Delhi, Siddiqi said the summit will majorly focus on brain injuries and women related issues.

Ironically, despite the international commitment, women belonging to the poorer classes and marginalized sections face differential access to health care facilities.

The United Nations estimated that in the developing world as a whole, one third of all pregnant women receive no health care during pregnancy. It also projected that women account for 70% of the world’s poor and poverty ridden, marred by inequality and limited decision making power; this in turn also adversely impacts their health.

Women, being the nation builder, are worthy of special concern in the health sector. In addition, the time demands for a need to explore and understand the health concerns of women belonging to marginalized sections, since they are particularly exposed to discrimination.

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World Health Organization Preparing For Some Significant Modifications

The World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of the WHO, passed a number of resolutions aimed at improving global health.

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WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus paid homage to his predecessor, Margaret Chan, saying the reforms begun under her leadership to make the World Health Organization more responsive and better able to tackle emergencies were now paying off.
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization. VOA

The World Health Organization’s annual conference ended on a high note Saturday, with the organization’s director general praising delegates for giving him a strong mandate to implement an ambitious program of reforms and initiatives that will improve global health.

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus paid homage to his predecessor, Margaret Chan, saying the reforms begun under her leadership to make the World Health Organization more responsive and better able to tackle emergencies were now paying off.

“The current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has demonstrated exactly that. … Let me assure you that I am personally committed to ensuring that we do everything we can to stop this outbreak as soon as possible,” Tedros said. “And the commitment of the government, of course, and the leadership is at the center, which we really admire.”

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus paid homage to his predecessor, Margaret Chan, saying the reforms begun under her leadership to make the World Health Organization more responsive and better able to tackle emergencies were now paying off.
The World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of the WHO, passed a number of resolutions aimed at improving global health. Wikimedia Common

The World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of the WHO, passed a number of resolutions aimed at improving global health. Some deal with diseases that have plagued humanity for centuries, while others are newly emerging.

But all these decisions, Tedros said, involve commitments to make the world a healthier, safer place. For example, he noted the assembly had approved a road map to reduce deaths from cholera by 90 percent by 2030.

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“You endorsed our five-year strategic plan on polio transition, to strengthen country health systems that could be affected by the scaling down of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative,” he said. “You passed resolutions on tuberculosis and noncommunicable diseases. … And you have agreed to increase the development and use of digital technologies to improve health and keep the world safe.”

Tedros urged the delegates to go back to their countries with renewed determination to work every day for the health of their people. How well they succeed in this endeavor, he said, will be measured by the outcomes, by whether they result in real change on the ground. (VOA)