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Accidental Discovery of Hindu Epic Ramayana’s ‘New’ version portrays Sita and Lord Rama more as humans

The manuscript was accidently founded by scholars at the Asiatic Society library where they were researching on Vanhi Purana of the 6th century

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Lord Rama and Sita. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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August 16, 2016: A different version of the integral Hindu epic Ramayana, written by Valmiki has been extracted from a Sanskrit library in Kolkata. As much as it has moved the scholars who found it, it might as well widen the readers’ horizon.

Last year in December, the manuscript was found by accident at the Asiatic Society Library by scholars who were researching on Vanhi Purana of the 6th century. The scholars were searching through a global informational storage known as Catalogus Catalogorum, where they found that a manuscript of the other version of Ramayana was tucked at the 100-year-old Samskrita Sahitya Parishad, Kolkata.

A painting from Bala Kanda, where Rama and Lakshmana go to meet Vishwamitra. Source: Wikimedia Commons
A painting from Bala Kanda, where Rama and Lakshmana go to meet Vishwamitra.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

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This version of Ramayana is different from the one widely read by people out of its difference that this manuscript talks more about the separation of Sita and Lord Rama as a husband and wife than the separation of father and son. Ram and Sita have also been portrayed more as humans than God and goddess, mentioned indiadivine.org report.

The scholars found the second manuscript of Vanhi Purana in the library’s archives, and analysed the slokas that they were different yet familiar to Ramayana, for the story revolves around Ram, Sita, and Ravana. This manuscript, the Dasa Griba Rakshash Charitram Vadha, was perhaps a result of various interpolations.

The newly discovered version is also divided into five sections, instead of seven of the generalised Ramayana. It has also omitted Uttarkanda i.e., the last chapter of Ramayana, and Balakanda— the description of Rama’s childhood. There is also no mention of the curse that fell upon King Dashrath to send Rama on an exile of 14 years. The epic ends with the end of Rama’s exile (or vanvaas) and his return to ‘Ram-nagari’ Ayodhya.

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According to the indiadivine.org, in this version of Ramayana, the epic begins with Goddess Laxmi being cursed by Shukracharya, for his wife was killed by Narayana. Also, another curse that gets on Narayana and Laxmi talks about both bearing the separation. Dharitri, for being unable to witness the battle between demons and gods, cursed both of them.

A painting of Lanka-naresh Ravana. Source: Wikimedia Commons
A painting of Lanka-naresh Ravana. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“Ram here is more human than God, with follies like anger and failure. Some interesting details – like the ages of Sita and Rama at the time of marriage and the date when Sita was abducted by Ravana -are in this version,” said Manabendu Bandyopadhyay, Historical and Archaeological Secretary at The Asiatic Society, Kolkata to a news portal.

– prepared by Chetna Karnani, at NewsGram. Twitter: @karnani_chetna

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  • Kabir Chaudhary

    To be Frank, In my opinion the Ramayana is just a folklore that was recited in the ancient times to make kids understand that good always wins over evil. Like story of the rabbit and the tortoise.

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  • Kabir Chaudhary

    To be Frank, In my opinion the Ramayana is just a folklore that was recited in the ancient times to make kids understand that good always wins over evil. Like story of the rabbit and the tortoise.

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Petrol Prices On The Reverse Trend For The Last 13 Days: Prices Fall

Both in Delhi and Kolkata, diesel prices in the fortnight have declined

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Petrol Prices On The Reverse Trend For The Last 13 Days: Prices Falls
Petrol Prices On The Reverse Trend For The Last 13 Days: Prices Falls, flickr

Domestic petrol prices, which had hit record levels for 16 consecutive days in May, have been on the reverse trend for the last 13 days, including Monday, but the relief for consumers has been slow in coming.

The pace of decline has been less than half the rate of surge.

Percentage-wise, since May 30, when prices started to take a downturn, petrol prices have slipped 2.35 per cent in Delhi, compared to the 5.5 per cent in the previous 16 days.

In absolute terms, prices have gone down by Rs 1.85 a litre since May 30, compared to the increase of Rs 3.8 per litre in the during May 14-29. On Monday, fuel was sold at Rs 76.58 per litre in the national capital, down 20 paise from Sunday’s level, the IndianOil Corp’s website showed.

In Mumbai, where petrol prices were the highest in the country last month, the decline has been much slow at Rs 1.23 per litre so far, against the rise of Rs 3.76 a litre during May 14-29.

On Monday, petrol price in Mumbai was Rs 84.41 per litre against Rs 84.61 on Sunday. Similarly, in Kolkata and Chennai, the fuel was sold at Rs 79.25 and Rs 79.48 respectively.

In Kolkata and Chennai too, the decline has been Rs 1.81 and Rs 1.65 per litre in the last 13 days, around 50 per cent of the previous rate of increase.

In tandem with petrol prices, diesel too has seen a decline, but of only around 2 per cent in all the major cities including Delhi, compared to over 5 per cent rise in the previous fortnight.

Petrol station
Petrol station, flickr

Both in Delhi and Kolkata, diesel prices in the last 13 days have declined by Rs 1.36, and in Mumbai and Kolkata, the fall was of Rs 1.44 and Rs 1.45 per litre respectively.

Also read: Petrol price slashes by 32 paise and diesel price by 85 paise

On Monday, prices of the fuel in Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and Chennai were at Rs 67.95, Rs 70.50, Rs 72.35 and Rs 71.73 per litre, respectively. (IANS)