Sunday December 17, 2017

Addyi: an antidepressant, not female Viagra

0
125

25FactsAboutFlibanserin  By NewsGram Staff Writer

While sexual problems remain a more clandestine affair for women than men, a respite in the name of Addyi has been introduced. This pink pill can pull out women from their depression which is caused due to their sexual inactivity.

With the US FDA giving a green signal to Flibanserin, commonly known as Addyi, the pharmaceutical industry has received its first drug which can treat a flagging or absent libido in women.

Addyi is erroneously being called as the “female Viagra”. However, that is not the case! While Viagra treats erectile dysfunction and focuses on the genitals of a man, Addyi works on the central nervous system, thereby targeting the brain and not the genitals.

Sprout Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of this pill won the FDA approval after two consecutive rejections in the year 2010 and 2013 respectively. The approval of Addyi is accompanied by various side-effects and caveat. Since Addyi targets the brain, it is classified under the category of antidepressants.

This drug comes with side-effects that include dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence. While Viagra is a pill that men take before a sexual encounter, Addyi needs to be taken everyday. Moreover, this pill can be prescribed only by doctors and apothecaries who watch an online presentation and pass a test related to it.

lady-viagra

This prescription of this drug doesn’t entail that the woman is ill or is undergoing some relationship problems. Instead, this pill is dispensed for women whose loss of sexual desire causes marked distressed or depression in some cases.

While Dr Lauren Streicher, associate professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology at Northwest University believes that this pill will induce women to talk about their sexual problems, Adriane Fugh-Berman, a pharmacology professor and director of PharmedOut thinks that such drugs open way for other “bad drugs” to enter into the market.

Next Story

 Dairy farmers want US regulators to Banish the term “soy milk” : But Why?

The sour history over who gets to use “milk” reaches back to at least 1997, when a soy foods group petitioned the FDA to recognize the term “soymilk"

0
40
soy milk
A photo shows the ingredients label for soy milk at a grocery store in New York, Feb. 16, 2017. The dairy industry says terms like “soy milk” violate the federal standard for milk, but even government agencies have internally clashed over the proper term.VOA
  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture “fervently” wanted to use the term “soy milk” in educational materials for the public
  • That irked the Food and Drug Administration, the agency that oversees the rule defining milk as coming from healthy cows
  • The sour history over who gets to use “milk” reaches back to at least 1997, when a soy foods group petitioned the FDA to recognize the term “soymilk”

New York, July 4, 2017: Dairy farmers want U.S. regulators to banish the term “soy milk,” but documents show even government agencies haven’t always agreed on what to call such drinks.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture “fervently” wanted to use the term “soy milk” in educational materials for the public, according to emails recently released in response to a lawsuit. That irked the Food and Drug Administration, the agency that oversees the rule defining milk as coming from healthy cows.

It’s “not a trivial decision,” the FDA warned in one of the 2011 emails about the USDA’s desire to use the term.

The sour history over who gets to use “milk” reaches back to at least 1997, when a soy foods group petitioned the FDA to recognize the term “soymilk”. A couple of years later, the group pointed out that the FDA itself had used the term. Even now, the National Milk Producers Federation says it’s working to build support for legislation directing the FDA to enforce the federal standard. The dairy group says both “soy milk” and “soymilk” are inappropriate ways to describe non-dairy drinks made from soybeans, and that the one-word version is just an attempt to get around the definition.

ALSO READNDDB accounts for 90 percent of milk production in India: T Nanda Kumar

There are plenty of other food names at issue. A European Union court recently ruled that a company named TofuTown can’t describe its products as “cheese.” U.S. rice producers have railed against “pretenders ” like diced cauliflower and said they may take the issue to the FDA.

But the FDA hasn’t even always been able to get other agencies to go along, as illustrated in the emails obtained by the Good Food Institute, which advocates alternatives to industrial animal agriculture. The GFI sued the FDA for public records relating to soy milk.

The email exchange started when a nutrition adviser at the Department of Health and Human Services alerted the FDA that the USDA planned to use “soy milk” in educational materials about dietary guidelines.

“USDA staff are preparing consumer publications and fervently want to use the term ‘soy milk’ because beverages are widely marketed this way,” the adviser wrote.

The FDA bristled and provided the federal definition of milk as a “lacteal secretion” from cows. Therefore, the FDA declared that referring to soy, almond and rice drinks as “milk” would be incorrect. It suggested the other agency say “beverage” or “fortified beverage.”

When that didn’t put the matter to rest, the FDA warned that the USDA’s use of the term could undermine the FDA’s regulatory authority.

That apparently didn’t stop the USDA, either.

“They are adamant about using the term in consumer publications,” the nutrition adviser wrote. The USDA had indicated that it would use “soy beverage” in official policy documents, but it wanted to use “plain language” in materials for the public.

Despite the federal regulation, others may also consider “soy milk” an acceptable term. The Merriam-Webster dictionary doesn’t limit milk’s definition to cows, saying it is “a fluid secreted by the mammary glands of females for the nourishment of their young.”

It also allows for a “food product produced from seeds or fruit that resembles and is used similarly to cow’s milk.”

Asked how the spat was resolved, the USDA provided materials from 2011 that use both terms by referring to “soymilk (soy beverage).” The agency also uses the term elsewhere, including on its “Choose My Plate” website, which currently says “calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage)” is part of the dairy group.

The National Milk Producers Federation says the USDA’s usage of the term shows even other government agencies are confused about how to describe soy beverages in the absence of consistent enforcement by the FDA.

The FDA declined to comment. (VOA)

Next Story

Zika Virus Fight: FDA Plans To Exterminate Disease With Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

0
68
Zika virus

There is a new plan to combat the growing threat of Zika virus with genetically modified mosquitoes; the F.D.A. has given preliminary approval to conduct a trial just north of Key West on Saturday. Experts claimed that these insects are unlikely to harm humans, animals or the environment. “The consequences of escape, survival, and establishment of…

Next Story

Spicy lies: Yippee ad claims being safe, FDA disagrees

0
49

img1440393117822By NewsGram Staff Writer

After the recent Maggi ban and its subsequent upliftment, now Yippee noodles is on the path of courting controversy.

Today’s  Hindustan Times flashed a huge brightly colored advertisement that claims that Yipee is safe and bases the claim on a number of tests it underwent to prove its credibility. However, Indian Express, dated 24th August 2015, in a report claims that excessive lead has been found in the samples of Yippee noodles.

The report says that Uttar Pradesh Food and Drug Authority (FDA) recently found excess lead in ITC’s Yippee noodles. The samples tested contained lead amount  “in excess to the permissible limit”. The tested samples had 1.057 ppm of lead as against the permissible amount of below 1 ppm.

The report has been sent to the FDA Chief Commissioner for permission before filing an official case.