Tuesday June 19, 2018

After effects of the caffeine hangover

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A cup of slow death?

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Are you a coffee aficionado? Do you have a sweet tooth for caffeine? You might (not) want to consider life without the morning cup of espresso.

For those looking to kick the butt off the caffeine syndrome, here are a few pointers to the beginning of life without caffeine:

The first thing you will encounter is weakness. The withdrawals, as per researchers, include headaches, lethargy and hefty mood swings.

Since sodas come loaded with sugar, weight loss might also be witnessed. Ironically, some people may experience exactly the opposite; weight gain. This is due to the fact that caffeine suppresses appetite and therefore, to stop drinking the stimulant would lead to a more natural appetite.

Sleep would be deep, and according to researchers, those who don’t drink caffeine will be able to clock in more snooze time than those who do, even if a little bit.

Mental balance would soon return with the easing of blood pressure. Lesser anxiety and stress would provide more relaxation to the individual.

However, not everything is wrong with caffeine intake though. Coffee is the number one source of antioxidants, drinking five to six cups of which cuts heart disease risk by 21 percent.

Caffeine also boosts exercise performance and so reducing the intake of coffee may amount to reduction in the amount of calories burnt during an intense workout.

To drink caffeine or not is the question.

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Your daily cup of coffee can worsen Alzheimer’s symptoms

For the study, the team analysed the effect of caffeine on normal ageing mice and familial Alzheimers models

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Coffee can worsen Alzheimer's symptoms. IANS
  • Intake of coffee or caffeine may worsen Alzheimer’s symptoms
  • It may worsen their neuropsychiatric symptoms
  • There can be significant side effects too

Regular intake of coffee or caffeine by patients with Alzheimer’s disease may worsen their neuropsychiatric symptoms, including anxiety, say researchers. While it is well known that memory problems are the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease, this dementia is also characterised by neuropsychiatric symptoms, which may be strongly present already in the first stages of the disorder.

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Coffee can cause problems to the patients of Alzheimer’s disease. IANS

These are known as Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) and include anxiety, apathy, depression, hallucinations, paranoid, sundowning and more. The results indicate that caffeine worsened these symptoms in mice with Alzheimer’s. The researchers also discovered significant effects, especially in relation to neophobia — a fear of everything new — anxiety-related behaviours, and emotional and cognitive flexibility.

“The mice develop Alzheimer’s disease in a very close manner to the human patients with early-onset form of the disease,” said lead author Raquel Baeta-Corral from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in Spain. “They not only exhibit the typical cognitive problems but also a number of Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD)-like symptoms, so it is a valuable model to address whether the benefits of caffeine will be able to compensate its putative negative effects.”

Also Read: Reducing Alzheimer’s stigma crucial for prevention research

For the study, the team analysed the effect of caffeine on normal ageing mice and familial Alzheimers models. However, coffee has also been suggested as a strategy to prevent dementia, both in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and in normal ageing processes, due to its action in blocking molecules – adenosine receptors – which may cause dysfunctions and diseases in old age.

It can worsen the condition of patients of Alzheimer's. Pixabay
It can worsen the condition of patients of Alzheimer’s. Pixabay

But “our observations of adverse caffeine effects in an Alzheimer’s disease model together with previous clinical observations suggest that an exacerbation of BPSD-like symptoms may partly interfere with the beneficial cognitive effects of caffeine”, the researchers said. IANS

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