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Batteries that charge your Smartphones in 15 minutes to be a reality soon!

Made out of wonder material, Graphene, the battery has the potential to revolutionise the world of battery technology

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(Representational Image) Image Source: consumerreports.org
  • Unveiled by Chinese company Dongxu Optoelectronics at an event in Beijing at the beginning of July, the battery pack is called the G-King
  • The Chinese company claims that the battery regains its lost charge in a matter of 13-15 minutes
  • Apart from smartphones, these batteries might be a breakthrough in the world of electric cars as well

While the companies selling smartphones and batteries continue to boast about fast recharging systems, but how fast can they really be? Can they recharge your phone completely in less than 15 minutes? Well, it is now possible with the coming of the world’s first ‘ Graphene’ battery pack.

Here is everything that you need to know about the world’s fastest battery recharging systems listed by businessinsider.com:

  • Unveiled by Chinese company Dongxu Optoelectronics at an event in Beijing at the beginning of July, the battery pack is called the G-King.
  • G-King has a capacity of 4,800mAh, which is considerably higher than any contemporary technology we find in smartphones, small tablets, and compact laptops like the 11-inch MacBook Air.

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  • The Chinese company claims that the battery regains its lost charge in a matter of 13-15 minutes.
  • G-King is strong enough to discharge and then again recharge up to 3,500 times, which is approximately seven times the strength of a regular Li-Ion battery.
  • Made out of wonder material, Graphene, the battery has the potential to revolutionise the world of battery technology.
Graphene. Image Source:YouTube.com
Graphene. Image Source:YouTube.com
  • Apart from smartphones, these batteries might be a breakthrough in the world of electric cars as well.
  • Dongxu hasn’t yet announced the launch of G-Kings commercially. It hasn’t revealed any information on when will the battery or its derivative reach us.

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  • Graphene batteries are touted to be expensive when it comes to market for the first time, may be in the region of $150, but the prices will gradually come down and it could be an economical option as well considering it is the only battery pack you will ever have to buy.

-prepared by Bulbul Sharma, a staff-writer at NewsGram. Twitter handle: iBulbul_

ALSO READ:

  • Aparna Gupta

    Graphene battery would be a strong support to all the the mobile users. This would be a great achievement in mobile sector.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Not only this, but there are inventions in which the battery would last forever.

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Tiny Diamonds Can Prevent Short-Circuits and Fires in Mobile Phone Batteries: Study

Mixing nanodiamonds into the electrolyte solution of a lithium ion battery slows dendrite formation to nil through 100 charge-discharge cycles

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Tiny diamonds prevent fires in phone batteries
Tiny diamonds prevent fires in phone batteries. Pixabay
  • The researchers described a process by which tiny diamonds curtail the electrochemical deposition called plating
  • We anticipate the first use of our proposed technology will be in less critical applications
  • Battery buildups called dendrites  are one of the main causes of lithium battery malfunction

USA, August 28, 2017: Researchers have found that tiny diamonds (diamond particles 10,000 times smaller than the diameter of a hair) can prevent short-circuits and fires in lithium batteries widely used in various mobile devices from smartphones to laptops.

The new process that uses tiny diamonds can turn electrolyte solution – a key component of most batteries into a safeguard against the chemical process that leads to battery-related disasters.

In the study, published in the journal Nature Communications, the researchers described a process by which tiny diamonds curtail the electrochemical deposition, called plating, that can lead to hazardous short-circuiting of lithium ion batteries.

“We anticipate the first use of our proposed technology will be in less critical applications, not in cell phones or car batteries,” said Yury Gogotsi, Professor at Drexel University Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US.

“To ensure safety, additives to electrolytes, such as nano diamonds, need to be combined with other precautions, such as using non-flammable electrolytes, safer electrode materials and stronger separators,” Gogotsi added.

Also Read: Lithium Batteries can be charged faster in the near Future: Scientists

As batteries are used and charged, the electrochemical reaction results in the movement of ions between the two electrodes of a battery, which is the essence of an electrical current.

Over time, this re-positioning of ions can create tendril-like buildups almost like stalactites forming inside a cave.

These battery buildups, called dendrites, are one of the main causes of lithium battery malfunction.

As dendrites form inside the battery over time, they can reach the point where they push through the separator, a porous polymer film that prevents the positively charged part of a battery from touching the negatively charged part.

When the separator is breached, a short-circuit can occur, which can also lead to a fire since the electrolyte solution in most lithium-ion batteries is highly flammable.

To avoid dendrite formation and minimize the probability of fire, current battery designs include one electrode made of graphite filled with lithium instead of pure lithium.

The use of graphite as the host for lithium prevents the formation of dendrites. But lithium intercalated graphite also stores about 10 times less energy than pure lithium.

The new study showed that mixing nano diamonds into the electrolyte solution of a lithium ion battery slows dendrite formation to nil through 100 charge-discharge cycles.

The finding means that a great increase in energy storage is possible because dendrite formation can be eliminated in pure lithium electrodes.

The discovery is just the beginning of a process that could eventually see electrolyte additives, like nano diamonds, widely used to produce safe lithium batteries with a high energy density, Gogotsi noted. (IANS)

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If I Buy Electric Car, Where will I Charge it? European Countries Aim to be all-electric by 2040

Those lofty ambitions face numerous challenges, including one practical consideration for consumers: If they buy electric cars, where will they charge them?

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Charging problems with electric car
Tesla cars recharge at a Tesla station at a shopping center in Charlotte, N.C., June 24, 2017. Buyers of Tesla’s luxury models have access to a company-funded Supercharger network. VOA
  • The distribution of public charging stations is wildly uneven around the globe
  • European Countries Aim to be all-electric by 2040
  • Due to lack of charging stations, electric vehicles make up less than 1 percent of cars on the road

New Delhi, August 13, 2017: Around the world, support is growing for electric cars. Automakers are delivering more electric models with longer range and lower prices, such as the Chevrolet Bolt and the Tesla Model 3. China has set aggressive targets for electric vehicle sales to curb pollution; some European countries aim to be all-electric by 2040 or sooner.

Those lofty ambitions face numerous challenges, including one practical consideration for consumers: If they buy electric cars, where will they charge them?

The distribution of public charging stations is wildly uneven around the globe. Places with lots of support from governments or utilities, like China, the Netherlands and California, have thousands of public charging outlets. Buyers of Tesla’s luxury models have access to a company-funded Supercharger network.

Charging stations scarce

But in many places, public charging remains scarce. That’s a problem for people who need to drive further than the 200 miles or so that most electric cars can travel. It’s also a barrier for the millions of people who don’t have a garage to plug in their cars overnight.

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“Do we have what we need? The answer at the moment is, ‘No,’” said Graham Evans, an analyst with IHS Markit.

Take Norway, which has publicly funded charging and generous incentives for electric car buyers. Architect Nils Henningstad drives past 20 to 30 charging stations each day on his 22-mile (35-kilometer) commute to Oslo. He works for the city and can charge his Nissan Leaf at work; his fiancee charges her Tesla SUV at home or at one of the world’s largest Tesla Supercharger stations, 20 miles away.

Electric cars problem
Jeff Solie plugs in his electric car Tesla sedan at his home, in New Berlin, Wis., July 13, 2017. Electric cars are seeing growing support around the world. But there’s a problem: There aren’t enough places to plug those cars in. VOA

It’s a very different landscape in New Berlin, Wisconsin, where Jeff Solie relies on the charging system he rigged up in his garage to charge two Tesla sedans and a Volt. Solie and his wife don’t have chargers at their offices, and the nearest Tesla Superchargers are 45 miles (72 kilometers) away.

“If I can’t charge at home, there’s no way for me to have electric cars as my primary source of transportation,” said Solie, who works for the media company E.W. Scripps.

Small percentage of electric vehicles

The uneven distribution of chargers worries many potential electric vehicle owners. It’s one reason electric vehicles make up less than 1 percent of cars on the road.

“Humans worst-case their purchases of automobiles. You have to prove to the consumer that they can drive across the country, even though they probably won’t,” said Pasquale Romano, the CEO of ChargePoint, one of the largest charging station providers in North America and Europe.

Romano says there’s no exact ratio of the number of chargers needed per car. But he says workplaces should have one charger for every 2.5 electric cars and retail stores need one for every 20 electric cars. Highways need one every 50 to 75 miles, he says. That suggests a lot of gaps still need to be filled.

Filling the charging gap

Automakers and governments are pushing to fill them. The number of publicly available, global charging spots grew 72 percent to more than 322,000 last year, the International Energy Agency said. Navigant Research expects that to grow to more than 2.2 million by 2026; more than one-third of those will be in China.

Tesla Inc., which figured out years ago that people wouldn’t buy its cars without roadside charging, is doubling its global network of Supercharger stations to 10,000 this year. BMW, Daimler, Volkswagen and Ford are building 400 fast-charging stations in Europe. Volkswagen is building hundreds of stations across the U.S. as part of its settlement for selling polluting diesel engines. Even oil-rich Dubai, which just got its first Tesla showroom, has more than 50 locations to charge electric cars.

ALSO READ: Apple to join the fiercely competitive race to design Self-driving Cars

But there are pitfalls. There are different types of charging stations, and no one knows the exact mix drivers will eventually need. A grocery store might spend $5,000 for an AC charge point, which provides a car with 5 to 15 miles of range in 30 minutes. But once most cars get 200 or 300 miles per charge, slow chargers are less necessary. Electric cars with longer range need fast-charging DC chargers along highways, but DC chargers cost $35,000 or more.

That uncertainty makes it difficult to make money setting up chargers, says Lisa Jerram, an associate director with Navigant Research. For at least the next three to five years, she says, deep-pocketed automakers, governments and utilities will be primarily responsible for building charging infrastructure.

There’s also the question of who will meet the needs of apartment dwellers. San Francisco, Shanghai and Vancouver, Canada, are now requiring new homes and apartment buildings to be wired for EV charging.

But without government support, plans for charging stations can falter. In Michigan, a utility’s $15 million plan to install 800 public charging stations was scrapped in April after state officials and ChargePoint objected.

Solie, the electric car owner in Wisconsin, likes Europe’s approach: Governments should set bold targets for electric car sales and let the private sector meet the need.

“If the U.S. were to send up a flare that policy was going to change … investments would become very attractive,” he said. (VOA)

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Can Batteries Last forever? A new breakthrough may not far away

The breakthrough work could lead to commercial batteries with greatly lengthened lifespans for computers, smartphones, appliances, cars and spacecraft.

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Damaged mobile phones with dead batteries. Wikipedia

https://youtu.be/rTNwmVq4v04

Mya Le Thai, a scientist from the University of California, Irvine has introduced a new technology to mankind. An invention which is a nanowire-based battery material that can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times, moving us closer to a battery that would never require replacement.

She said Lithium ion batteries use nanowire technology which loses its ability to fully charge with time, they expand and grow brittle, which leads to cracking. So, there was a need to change this concept. These nanowires are extremely thin (1000 times thinner than the human hair). As a result, they are effective conductors of electricity and feature a large surface area for the storage and transfer of electrons. However, these wires are extremely fragile and don’t hold up well to repeated discharging and recharging.

Alkaline battery. Image source: Wikipedia
Alkaline battery. Image source: Wikipedia

According to Thai’s theory, nanowires could last longer if covered. After experimenting with many coverings they found a hard, clear plastic material called PMMA. These wires when covered with PMMA cycled through charges 28 times more than the covered ones. “The coated electrode holds its shape much better, making it a more reliable option,” Thai said. “This research proves that a nanowire-based battery electrode can have a long lifetime and that we can make these kinds of batteries a reality.” Also, they showed no signs of damage even after 200,000 cycles. It is unknown how much further testing of the batteries is needed before it could make a commercial debut; however, this was published in The American Chemical Society’s Energy Letters this week.

The breakthrough work could lead to commercial batteries with greatly lengthened lifespans for computers, smartphones, appliances, cars and spacecraft. And therefore, the results suggest that these batteries with covered nanowires might last forever.

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-by Vrushali Mahajan

Vrushali is pursuing her graduation in Journalism and is an intern at NewsGram. You can reach the author at twitter- Vrushali Mahajan